Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Carleton College
    amount: $100,000
    city: Northfield, MN
    year: 2012

    In recognition of the institution's 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Beverly Nagel

    In recognition of the institution's 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $100,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2012

    In recognition of the institution's 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Maureen Stanton

    In recognition of the institution's 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

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  • grantee: National Opinion Research Center
    amount: $481,975
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2012

    To improve public understanding of aging and work, by increasing quality and quantity of coverage of the economics of the aging workforce

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Trevor Tompson

    This two-year grant supports a project by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) to enhance public understanding of the economic issues surrounding the older workforce. NORC will field a high-quality, nationally representative survey of older adults about the strategies they use when claiming Social Security benefits and distribute the results nationwide through a partnership with the Associated Press (AP). Survey reporting will be supplemented with reporting on new economic research about optimal retirement asset draw-down strategies and survey data will be made freely available to researchers in a public-use dataset. Additional funds from this grant will provide one year of salary support to a NORC-AP fellow who will cover the older workforce beat, producing thoughtful, high-quality articles on a variety of issues, including aging and work, retirement, flexible work arrangements for older workers, productivity, and the economic impact of an aging workforce on businesses, pensions, and government programs like Social Security.

    To improve public understanding of aging and work, by increasing quality and quantity of coverage of the economics of the aging workforce

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  • grantee: The New York Academy of Medicine
    amount: $594,898
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2012

    To experiment with the design and implement the Sloan Awards for an Age Friendly-Workplace in New York City

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Ruth Finkelstein

    Funds from this grant will support an initiative by the New York Academy of Medicine to design and launch an Age-Friendly Workplaces Award aimed at recognizing New York City employers with innovative hiring, employment, and retirement practices that maximize the potential of older workers. Employers from each of the city's five boroughs will be eligible, and winners will be selected by an independent panel of high profile business leaders. Grant funds will support awards for between five and ten New York City businesses from a diverse array of industries and sectors, a dedicated website that will describe the awards and allow businesses to share information about best workplace practices, a series of case studies that highlight specific strategies for tapping the potential of older workers, and a published Guide for Age-Friendly Employers that will summarize current findings on best older worker policies and practices. Additional funds will support a robust outreach and public relations efforts, and a public ceremony honoring the winners. The awards raise the visibility of older workers as active and productive members of the workforce and to engage the business community issues related to the older workforce through identifying best practices and local champions.

    To experiment with the design and implement the Sloan Awards for an Age Friendly-Workplace in New York City

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  • grantee: Texas A&M University
    amount: $116,201
    city: College Station, TX
    year: 2012

    To support a pilot laboratory experimental study using MBA, MPA, and business students to assess the magnitude of age discrimination in the labor market at the resume stage of hiring

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Joanna Lahey

    To support a pilot laboratory experimental study using MBA, MPA, and business students to assess the magnitude of age discrimination in the labor market at the resume stage of hiring

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  • grantee: Washington University in St. Louis
    amount: $124,999
    city: St. Louis, MO
    year: 2012

    To develop and analyze theoretical models of the labor supply of married older workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Pollak

    To develop and analyze theoretical models of the labor supply of married older workers

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $584,817
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2012

    To advance measurement of income, spending, assets and debt by creating and analyzing a new database of high-quality, daily data on actual transactions and account balances of individuals

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Matthew Shapiro

    The grants funds a project by a team led by University of Michigan economist Matthew Shapiro, who will analyze an exciting new dataset to glean insights about the economic behavior of older Americans. Shapiro and his team will analyze member data provided by Pageonce, a firm that has developed a mobile phone app that lets users pay bills online as well as integrate disparate bank accounts, credit card balances, and investment accounts all in one place. Analyzing the Pageonce data, the team will focus on what it can tell us about how older workers spend and save, how they handle debt, and how saving and consumption decisions change after retirement.

    To advance measurement of income, spending, assets and debt by creating and analyzing a new database of high-quality, daily data on actual transactions and account balances of individuals

    More
  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $544,638
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2012

    To improve our understanding of the role of local labor demand in affecting the work and retirement patterns of older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Nicole Maestas

    Funds from this grant support the work of Nichole Maestas of the Rand Corporation, who is studying how changes in labor demand affects the employment outcomes of older workers. In earlier work, Maestas has catalogued how older workers often "unretire", re-entering the workforce after a previous exit. Some 60 percent of such workers who unretire end up changing occupations, moving from managerial and professional work to positions in sales, administration, and service provision, positions that are often part-time or offer more flexible scheduling opportunities. Maestas will look at existing datasets to understand the extent to which this phenomenon can be explained by changes in the labor demand for such positions, looking at how growth in industries with large proportions of sales, administrative or service jobs, and the subsequent increase in the demand for workers to fill these jobs, explains employment outcomes for older workers.

    To improve our understanding of the role of local labor demand in affecting the work and retirement patterns of older Americans

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $384,514
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2012

    To generate experimental evidence about the obstacles that older workers face as they seek reemployment after long periods of unemployment

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Daniel Silverman

    Fewer than a quarter of workers age 50 and older who lost their jobs between mid-2008 and the end of 2009 found work within 12 months, a rate much lower than for younger workers in similar circumstances. What explains this? Is it age discrimination? Bias against time spent unemployed? Local labor market conditions? This grant supports efforts by three labor economists, Daniel Silverman of the University of Michigan, Henry Farber of Princeton, and Till von Wachter of Columbia, to partly answer these questions by conducting a unique experiment that may advance our understanding of how the prospects of older worker re-employment are affected by time unemployed, tightness of local labor markets, and differences in job history. Silverman and the rest of the team will send out to employers some 12,000 pairs of job applications for a mythical unemployed older worker. The faux applications will be identical except for the length of time the applicant has been unemployed, and Silverman and his team will subsequently record the rate at which the applications receive a positive callback from employers, allowing them to estimate how the duration of unemployment affects the possibility of being re-hired. The team will field applications in a number of different labor markets, and will vary the job histories of applicants, which should yield additional insights into how labor market conditions and prior work experience affect the re-employment aspects of workers over 50.

    To generate experimental evidence about the obstacles that older workers face as they seek reemployment after long periods of unemployment

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  • grantee: Dartmouth College
    amount: $1,199,471
    city: Hanover, NH
    year: 2012

    To increase understanding of how recessions, including the Great Recession, affect the labor market activities and retirement of older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alan Gustman

    How do recessions in general, and the Great Recession in particular, impact older workers? Are older workers more or less likely to be laid off in recessions? If they are laid off, how long are they out of the labor force and are they eventually able to find new jobs? If they find new jobs, are they at the same or substantially lower pay? To what extent are unemployed older Americans effectively forced into early retirement? These are important questions that have real economic consequences for a significant portion of the labor market. This grant to Dartmouth College supports a project by Alan Gustman, Tom Steinmeier, and Nahid Tabatabai, to specify and estimate a structural retirement model to answer questions about how recessions, including the Great Recession of 2007-2009, affect the labor market activities and retirement of the older population, aged 50 and above. Working with data from the highly-regarded, longitudinal Health and Retirement Study, Gustman and his team will analyze the direct effects of recessions on work responses to layoffs and reduced market activities, as well as indirect effects from wealth losses and induced changes in health and disability status. Factors to be included in their analysis include changes in wealth, incentives from pensions and Social Security, spousal behavior, and the influence of key regulatory policies, including unemployment insurance, disability insurance, and the early claiming of Social Security benefits.

    To increase understanding of how recessions, including the Great Recession, affect the labor market activities and retirement of older Americans

    More