Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: San Francisco State University
    amount: $124,833
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To examine the effects of the Work Progress Administration (WPA) on long-term work, disability, and retirement outcomes

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Sepideh Modrek

    To examine the effects of the Work Progress Administration (WPA) on long-term work, disability, and retirement outcomes

    More
  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $249,626
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2018

    To produce research and inform policy-makers about the role that non-traditional jobs play for older workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alicia Munnell

    This grant will support four integrated research projects on the role played by nontraditional work arrangements—defined as jobs that lack benefits and that have significant wage and hour volatility—in the labor market decisions of older workers. Led by Alicia Munnell, director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, three of the projects focus on workers in their 50s and early 60s who may consider themselves too young to retire. The first project examines the extent to which the apparent rise in nontraditional employment for older individuals reflects the loss of traditional jobs to globalization and automation. The goal is to learn how the spread of these pressures to more industries could increase nontraditional work. To the extent that more older workers hold nontraditional jobs, the second project explores how these jobs are part of late-career employment patterns. Do these workers move back into traditional employment, for example—and, if so, after how long—and how often and for how long do they stay in nontraditional work for the remainder of their careers. The third project addresses the question of whether older nontraditional workers obtain access to retirement savings vehicles and health insurance through other sources, such as their spouses, public programs, or their own initiative. The fourth project focuses on an older group of workers—those in their 60s who are old enough to retire but are still working—and examines the extent to which nontraditional jobs help these workers improve their retirement security relative to retiring early.

    To produce research and inform policy-makers about the role that non-traditional jobs play for older workers

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $421,285
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To renew an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program called the “Sloan Fellowship on Aging and Work” that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lisa Berkman

    Funds from this grant provide four years of continued support for a multidisciplinary postdoctoral fellowship program at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (HCPDS) at Harvard’s School of Public Health. The Harvard fellowship program is designed to provide opportunities for seminars, mentorships, and speakers, with the goal of catalyzing a Cambridge-based research community for scholars of aging and work that will become part of the growing community of researchers focused on the intersection of aging and work. Grant funds will provide stipend support for two two-year fellowships along with subsidiary funds to support the fellows’ travel and research needs.

    To renew an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program called the “Sloan Fellowship on Aging and Work” that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

    More
  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $499,637
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2018

    To inform the design of questions to learn about alternative work arrangements among the population age 50 plus and provide new evidence on the role of these arrangements in older adults’ work lives

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Katharine Abraham

    This grant funds work by Katharine Abraham and John Haltiwanger of the University of Maryland and Susan Houseman of the Upjohn Institute to bring greater precision to our understanding of how to define and count the “alternative workforce,” and to gain deeper understanding of the roles the different types of alternative work arrangements play in older workers’ lives. Partnering with Gallup, Abraham and her team will field a nationally representative telephone survey of adults aged 18 to 80, asking them about their nontraditional work arrangements. The team will then create a new dataset by linking survey responses with administrative data from tax filings and household surveys. The new dataset will allow the team to probe how alternative work arrangements fit into the labor market behavior of older workers. Questions of interest include whether and to what extent alternative work arrangements are used during periods of traditional unemployment; whether they are a prelude to re-entry into the traditional workforce; the extent to which they are used to supplement retirement income, to offset the risk of 401(k)s, or to balance elder care responsibilities with the need to earn money; and what role the social aspects of work and its capacity to help structure one’s days play in the decision to take up an alternative work arrangement. These questions beg a more fundamental one: are these arrangements positive choices or options of last resort for older Americans? The created dataset will be made publicly available for use by other researchers and the project team expects the project to produce at least two peer reviewed papers, as well as a series of policy briefs and presentations aimed at both scholars and policymakers.

    To inform the design of questions to learn about alternative work arrangements among the population age 50 plus and provide new evidence on the role of these arrangements in older adults’ work lives

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $97,348
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To ascertain current policies of large companies toward older employees working beyond traditional retirement ages

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    To ascertain current policies of large companies toward older employees working beyond traditional retirement ages

    More
  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $125,000
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2018

    To pilot a new approach to collect linked worker-firm data in which both workers and employers provide information about the determinants of the length of working life

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Peter Hudomiet

    To pilot a new approach to collect linked worker-firm data in which both workers and employers provide information about the determinants of the length of working life

    More
  • grantee: Georgia State University Research Foundation
    amount: $107,931
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2018

    To conduct research on the returns to later-age degrees (for individuals 50 and older) in terms of wage premiums, employment stability, and retirement income

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Sally Wallace

    To conduct research on the returns to later-age degrees (for individuals 50 and older) in terms of wage premiums, employment stability, and retirement income

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $20,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2017

    To support the first paper in a two-year, three-paper research agenda on “The Equilibrium and Spillover Effects of Working Longer: Evidence from Quasi-Experimental Variation in Early Retirement Incentives”

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Benjamin Schoefer

    To support the first paper in a two-year, three-paper research agenda on “The Equilibrium and Spillover Effects of Working Longer: Evidence from Quasi-Experimental Variation in Early Retirement Incentives”

    More
  • grantee: Center for State and Local Government Excellence
    amount: $109,450
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To collect, analyze and code data on U.S. state pension statues and related policies that impact a retiree’s ability to continue working or return to work

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Joshua Franzel

    To collect, analyze and code data on U.S. state pension statues and related policies that impact a retiree’s ability to continue working or return to work

    More
  • grantee: National Press Foundation
    amount: $106,553
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To provide a four-day training in the public understanding of working longer to a set of 20 journalists

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Sandy Johnson

    To provide a four-day training in the public understanding of working longer to a set of 20 journalists

    More