Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Brandeis University
    amount: $413,385
    city: Waltham, MA
    year: 2017

    To create the first comprehensive database, with ages and genders, of approximately two million inventors who received a U.S. patent between 1976 and 2012 and to measure how inventive creativity varies over the life course of inventors

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Margie Lachman

    Research shows a shifting balance of gains and losses in cognitive abilities throughout adulthood, with increases in experience-based knowledge and decreases in the ability to process new information quickly and efficiently. However, as is the case with much psychological research, little is known about how these ability changes manifest in daily life, including in the workplace. This grant supports a project by psychologist Margie Lachman and economist Adam Jaffe to study creative output over the life course by augmenting and analyzing a large dataset of more than two million patent holders. Lachman and Jaffe will use the dataset to examine such questions as the extent to which individuals are able to maintain or increase the quality and quantity of their innovative work, whether this varies by sector or gender, and whether teams that bring older and younger workers together are less or more creative than teams that are less age-diverse. This research will result in new knowledge and important insights for economists, psychologists, and other social scientists who are interested in how aging-related cognitive changes can affect innovation across life trajectories and across different types of teams. The creation of the new database will also facilitate further research.

    To create the first comprehensive database, with ages and genders, of approximately two million inventors who received a U.S. patent between 1976 and 2012 and to measure how inventive creativity varies over the life course of inventors

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $437,161
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To compare the retirement paths of public and private employees, assessing differences in working conditions, retirement benefits, and government regulations and impacts on the age of retirement from career jobs and the likelihood of post-retirement work

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    Public sector and private sector employees experience what appear to be distinctly different routes from full-time employment to full-time retirement. This grant funds research by North Carolina State University’s Robert Clark and Harvard’s Joseph Newhouse that will compare the retirement paths of public and private workers and assess how working conditions, retirement benefits, and government regulations impact the age of retirement and the likelihood of working after retirement. Clark and Newhouse will commission 16 research studies that will examine the impact of pensions, health policies, employment rules, and government programs and regulations on the timing of when older workers leave their jobs, their potential for working after retirement, and how these differ for public and private sector employees. The research will be carried out in two waves, with eight projects and a capstone research conference for each wave.?

    To compare the retirement paths of public and private employees, assessing differences in working conditions, retirement benefits, and government regulations and impacts on the age of retirement from career jobs and the likelihood of post-retirement work

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $234,987
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2017

    To enhance the understanding of the options faced by households whose previous retirement plans now appear unrealistic, perhaps due to slow growth, lower than projected wage growth, or poor past or projected asset returns

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    Many economists predict that the global economy is entering a sustained period of historically low productivity and real wage growth. This grant funds work by economists John Shoven and Sita Slavov that will analyze the implications of working longer and strategies for saving for retirement in a such a low-growth, low-return, low real-wage-growth environment. How do optimal retirement and savings strategies change as the prospects of robust economic growth dim? This research will include two projects related to the broader theme of retirement-focused behaviors in a slow growth economy. The first will focus on the measuring the benefits accruing to working longer in a low-return environment. Using data taken from the influential Health and Retirement Study (HRS), Shoven and Slavov they will compute the rate of return to working longer for HRS respondents between ages 50 and 62 using a life cycle model that assumes individuals face borrowing constraints and that incorporates the actuarial benefit adjustments they receive when they delay Social Security The second project will explore in depth the impact of low wage growth and low asset returns in a slow growth economy. Shoven and Slavov will work through the theoretical implications of optimal savings and working decisions. Because savings depresses current standards of living in exchange for future benefits, the attractiveness of saving drops as asset returns slow. Likewise, the attractiveness of future work dips as wage growth slows. Shoven and Slavov will work out how these differing factors interact under standard economic modeling assumptions, paying special attention to the implications for working longer to raise or maintain living standards. The two projects form interesting and compelling research agenda that has real-life consequences for millions of Americans.

    To enhance the understanding of the options faced by households whose previous retirement plans now appear unrealistic, perhaps due to slow growth, lower than projected wage growth, or poor past or projected asset returns

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $599,839
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2017

    To support a conference series in order to foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    The annual Stanford Institute Economic Research (SIEPR) Working Longer Conferences allow researchers working at the intersection of aging and work to present their findings, compare approaches, imagine new projects, and get constructive feedback from fellow researchers. Over the past four years, more than 90 different scholars have presented high-quality research as authors, co-authors, or discussants, and each conference has averaged 60 to 70 attendees. The conferences also provide the opportunity for Sloan to identify new potential grantees and to introduce and welcome junior scholars to the community of working longer researchers. This grant provides funds to Stanford University to continue organizing, administering, and hosting the SIEPR Working Longer conferences for an additional three years.

    To support a conference series in order to foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $80,668
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2016

    To convene a conference of academic researchers and human resource practitioners to discuss practical ideas to apply emerging academic research to managing an aging workforce

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    To convene a conference of academic researchers and human resource practitioners to discuss practical ideas to apply emerging academic research to managing an aging workforce

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  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $125,000
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2016

    To investigate the impact of the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test, which creates substantial disincentives for work, on the elderly employment rate

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Damon Jones

    To investigate the impact of the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test, which creates substantial disincentives for work, on the elderly employment rate

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  • grantee: ProPublica
    amount: $125,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2016

    To research and publish data-driven systems investigations of the major trends, structures and programs shaping the lives of Americans age 60 forward with an eye to uncovering where these arrangements might limit opportunities or fail to adequately serve both 60-plus individuals and the broader society

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Peter Gosselin

    To research and publish data-driven systems investigations of the major trends, structures and programs shaping the lives of Americans age 60 forward with an eye to uncovering where these arrangements might limit opportunities or fail to adequately serve both 60-plus individuals and the broader society

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $125,000
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2016

    To analyze how technological change affected the retirement behavior of older workers in the last three decades with a case study of computerization, arguably the most important technological change of our era

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Peter Hudomiet

    To analyze how technological change affected the retirement behavior of older workers in the last three decades with a case study of computerization, arguably the most important technological change of our era

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $399,958
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2016

    To find out how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened, and whether the trend towards working at older ages is likely to continue in the future, especially in view of adverse trends in health

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Susann Rohwedder

    The ability to accurately predict the U.S. labor force participation rate among older workers is important, not least because it bears significantly on the finances of the Social Security system. Traditional methods for predicting this crucial statistic involve extrapolating from past trends. Past trends, however, may not continue. Over the past 25 years, for instance, the labor force participation rate of the population aged 60 to 69 has been increasing, in part because Americans in their 60s were getting progressively healthier. But recent studies suggest this is no longer the case. What effects, if any, will the halting of this trend toward better health in older Americans have on labor force participation rates? This grant funds the work of researchers Susann Rohwedder and Michael Hurd, who are examining this issue. Using twelve waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), Rohwedder and Hurd will study how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened and examine whether the trend toward working at older ages is likely to continue, especially in view of adverse trends in health. One particular focus of their work will be the relationship between labor force participation rates and individuals’ forecasts about how long they will continue to work as they age, examining how predictive these forecasts have been in the past and how their predictive power varies along multiple dimensions. Once this relationship is better understood, the hope is to use this knowledge to inform forecasts of labor force participation rates going forward.

    To find out how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened, and whether the trend towards working at older ages is likely to continue in the future, especially in view of adverse trends in health

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  • grantee: Urban Institute
    amount: $204,951
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To identify policy reforms that could reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Johnson

    This grant supports the planning of a project led by Richard Johnson and Eugene Steuerle of the Urban Institute to identify, simulate, and evaluate policy reforms that, taken alone, as well as simultaneously, would reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults. In so doing, this larger project would provide important new information about the likely costs and benefits of reforming Social Security, Medicare, employer-sponsored retirement plans, and tax incentives for retirement saving. The larger project will use DYNASIM, the Urban Institute’s dynamic microsimulation model, to simulate the likely impact of potential retirement program reforms across a vast array of dimensions, including effects on employment at older ages; on older adults’ household wealth; on annual income; on lifetime Social Security benefits; on income tax payments; and on out-of-pocket spending on medical care. The team will also model the effects of hypothetical reforms on government revenues and outlays. The planning activities funded by this grant will lay the groundwork for the larger project by implementing necessary enhancements to DYNASIM, specifying criteria for evaluating policy reforms, and making the case for the need to reform retirement programs to eliminate work disincentives.

    To identify policy reforms that could reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults

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