Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $604,647
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To deliver an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program on aging and work that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lisa Berkman

    This grant supports an initiative by the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (HCPDS) to launch an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program, the Sloan Fellowship on Aging and Work, which will support leading young scholars who wish to use multidisciplinary approaches to study the social and economic challenges posed by the aging work force. Led by center director Lisa Berkman, the HCPDS fellowship program will support three postdoctoral fellows for two-year terms beginning in September 2016. Fellows will be selected through a competitive application process, with candidates evaluated based on a number of criteria, including the quality of past work, the strength of their proposed research plans, and their potential to integrate questions, approaches, or analysis from two or more disciplines, including epidemiology, economics, psychology, neuroscience, and sociology.

    To deliver an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program on aging and work that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

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  • grantee: Colorado State University Foundation
    amount: $63,773
    city: Fort Collins, CO
    year: 2015

    To analyze existing data linked from two sources, the Health and Retirement Study and the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database, to study two novel research questions regarding workers’ perceptions of their work ability (i.e., job-related functional capacity)

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Gwenith Fisher

    To analyze existing data linked from two sources, the Health and Retirement Study and the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database, to study two novel research questions regarding workers’ perceptions of their work ability (i.e., job-related functional capacity)

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $19,472
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To support a pre-conference as part of a larger project to better understand the retirement and work prospects of women by connecting events in their early adult lives to their later employment histories

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Claudia Goldin

    To support a pre-conference as part of a larger project to better understand the retirement and work prospects of women by connecting events in their early adult lives to their later employment histories

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  • grantee: Fedcap Rehabilitation Services Inc
    amount: $124,828
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To design and pilot a staffing agency focused on placing experienced workers age 55+ in part and full time jobs at market wages and to ensure that the business model for this staffing agency has the potential for achieving solvency within two years

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lorrie Lutz

    To design and pilot a staffing agency focused on placing experienced workers age 55+ in part and full time jobs at market wages and to ensure that the business model for this staffing agency has the potential for achieving solvency within two years

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  • grantee: National Opinion Research Center
    amount: $108,880
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2014

    To assess the demand among potential audiences for a Working Longer Resource Center that would catalog, synthesize, and disseminate the body of research on the economics of working longer and the aging work force, making it accessible to those people who are in a position to use the information to assess outcomes for older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Trevor Tompson

    To assess the demand among potential audiences for a Working Longer Resource Center that would catalog, synthesize, and disseminate the body of research on the economics of working longer and the aging work force, making it accessible to those people who are in a position to use the information to assess outcomes for older Americans

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $74,444
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2014

    To understand the trend of health and socioeconomic position of early retirees by examining a nationally representative survey of older adults over a 15-year period

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Hwajung Choi

    To understand the trend of health and socioeconomic position of early retirees by examining a nationally representative survey of older adults over a 15-year period

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  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $124,950
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2014

    To determine the feasibility of creating a sustainable multidisciplinary aging and work research network

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jacquelyn James

    To determine the feasibility of creating a sustainable multidisciplinary aging and work research network

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $373,750
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2014

    To continue research on facilitating work at older ages, building on a set of studies already completed under a previous grant

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator David Wise

    Funds from this grant provide continued support to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) in its efforts to lead a network of top economists in the examination of issues related to aging and work and to the barriers to working longer. Led by economist David Wise, this network of scholars has substantial past and ongoing research expertise on health and health trends at older ages, population aging and its implications, the determinants of work and retirement, the incentives in public and employer policies, and the psychosocial factors that influence behavior. Grant funds will help NBER extend the network collaboration by producing at least nine papers focused on how to facilitate work at older ages. Additional topic areas to be addressed include work capacity at older ages; how public and employer benefit policies affect work and retirement; and factors that facilitate work by seniors, such as work environments and job flexibility.

    To continue research on facilitating work at older ages, building on a set of studies already completed under a previous grant

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $620,292
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2014

    To advance measurement of income, work activity, spending, assets, and debt by producing and analyzing a new data infrastructure based on the transactions and balances of individuals and use this infrastructure to study economic behavior and economic well-being of older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Matthew Shapiro

    Matthew Shapiro and a research team at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley have successfully completed an innovative, two-year data infrastructure pilot that lays the groundwork for providing invaluable data regarding the real-time financial activities of older Americans as they work, transition into, and complete retirement. The Michigan/Berkeley team relied on data from a mobile payments application, Check (previously known as Pageonce) that integrates individuals’ bank accounts, credit cards, and asset accounts. With this data, the research team developed a data infrastructure that can be used to study individual income paths, consumption patterns, wealth levels, and financial portfolio choices of Americans, with a specific focus in this study on older Americans, more than 40,000 of which are Check users.  Funds from this grant provide continued support for the project, allowing the team to move from pilot to production of the data infrastructure and maintain a panel dataset of the work, income, spending, and balance sheet of a population of approximately one million users.  Subsequent analyses will allow the research team to examine behavior of older Americans as they face labor market transitions, health shocks, and the take up of Social Security; produce time series estimates of income and spending for novel aggregates including, for example, spending and income by age and type; and study the quality of financial decisions among older populations and of behavioral reactions to discrete financial events like income tax refunds. The team has instituted numerous safeguards to ensure the confidentiality and privacy of individual consumer data are strictly protected.

    To advance measurement of income, work activity, spending, assets, and debt by producing and analyzing a new data infrastructure based on the transactions and balances of individuals and use this infrastructure to study economic behavior and economic well-being of older Americans

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  • grantee: National Academy of Social Insurance
    amount: $375,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2014

    To help Americans understand how they can enhance their long-term retirement security by delaying Social Security benefits, when feasible

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Virginia Reno

    Recent Sloan-funded work by economist John Shoven of Stanford University demonstrates that, under a wide range of circumstances, healthy Americans would benefit from delaying the age at which they begin taking Social Security benefits.  This grant funds a wide-ranging education campaign by the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) to effectively communicate Shoven’s research to the public. Building on its successful, user-friendly toolkit of materials, “Social Security: It Pays to Wait,” NASI will engage in an ambitious campaign to disseminate the toolkit through a multipronged media strategy that will utilize a grassroots outreach campaign composed of a number of well-connected partner organizations, including the Center for Rural Strategies, the National Women’s Law Center, the National Council of La Raza, and the National Urban League.  Grant funds will be used for dissemination, for efforts to deepen NASI’s connections with organizations well positioned to reach older workers, and for improvements to the toolkit based on user feedback.

    To help Americans understand how they can enhance their long-term retirement security by delaying Social Security benefits, when feasible

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