Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $265,051
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2013

    To provide supplemental funds to Grant #2012-KEC-12 so as to provide adequate incentive payments to respondents of the High School & Beyond Study (HSB) to ensure an 80 percent response rate

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Chandra Muller

    In 2012, the Trustees of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation approved a $3.2 million grant to the University of Texas to support a project to re-contact and survey the original, nationally representative High School and Beyond (HSB) 1980 sophomore class cohort in order to assess the effects of early-life human capital on later-life labor market, health, and family outcomes. This new data set will provide scholars with access to a wealth of data collected contemporaneously when the respondents were adolescents and young adults. These data include measures of cognitive and noncognitive skills, school performance, standardized test scores, family socioeconomic origins, health, early life careers, and family formation. The new dataset will enable scholars to study in previously unavailable detail the antecedents of later life labor market activities. This grant provides supplemental support to that project by creating a pool of funds for incentive payments for survey participants to ensure an 80 percent response rate.

    To provide supplemental funds to Grant #2012-KEC-12 so as to provide adequate incentive payments to respondents of the High School & Beyond Study (HSB) to ensure an 80 percent response rate

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $263,781
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To support a three-year post-doctoral program on the economics of an aging workforce

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator David Wise

    Funds of this grant support a new program at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) to sponsor a postdoctoral research fellow in each of the next three academic years, beginning in 2014 to 2015, whose research will focus on the economics of the aging workforce. Each fellow will receive one year of support to carry out research at NBER’s offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as well as to participate in the NBER summer institute workshops on Aging and Labor Studies. Selection of the three fellows will be made by a panel of experts who are members of both the Aging and Labor Studies programs at NBER. The committee’s decisions will be based on an evaluation of the fellows’ potential to make an important contribution to the understanding of the behavior of older workers and the functioning of labor markets for these workers.

    To support a three-year post-doctoral program on the economics of an aging workforce

    More
  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $1,120,309
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2013

    To improve the understanding of the availability and importance of different pecuniary and nonpecuniary job characteristics for older workers and their effects on older worker labor outcomes

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Nicole Maestas

    One difficulty in understanding the labor market behavior of older workers is that much of the needed data is not available. For instance, the National Institute on Aging’s Health and Retirement Survey—the gold standard data set for examining aging—does not collect detailed information about the pecuniary and nonpecuniary job characteristics of older workers. As such, trends in retirement and other labor market behaviors of older workers cannot be correlated with data about what their jobs are like. This grant provides support for a project by the Rand Corporation to correct this gap by collecting new data describing the actual and preferred working conditions of approximately 2,200 older Americans between the ages of 55 and 70 in the ongoing, nationally representative RAND American Life Panel (ALP). The new dataset will be made publicly available to the broader research community; will serve as encouragement to younger scholars to do research on aging and work; and will inform evidence-based conversations with the National Institute on Aging about adding items on the pecuniary and nonpecuniary attributes of work to the Health and Retirement Survey.

    To improve the understanding of the availability and importance of different pecuniary and nonpecuniary job characteristics for older workers and their effects on older worker labor outcomes

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $396,988
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To evaluate how institutions of higher education can effectively promote faculty diversity in higher education, including an evaluation of the Sloan Foundation's program on faculty career flexibility

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Frank Dobbin

    Funds from this grant support an innovative study by Harvard University that explores how colleges and universities can promote faculty diversity. Led by Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev and utilizing an original institutional-individual database on 13,000 faculty at 1,000 institutions from 1993 to 2013, the project team will examine the effects of academic hiring, promotion, diversity and work-life policies, and implementation supports on overall faculty diversity; career progress of STEM faculty from all race/ethnic-by-gender groups; and faculty family formation. Additionally, the team will specifically evaluate the impact of the Sloan Awards for Faculty Career Flexibility on these outcomes, and on the spread of flexibility policies beyond awardees and applicants.

    To evaluate how institutions of higher education can effectively promote faculty diversity in higher education, including an evaluation of the Sloan Foundation's program on faculty career flexibility

    More
  • grantee: Society for Human Resources Management Foundation
    amount: $909,650
    city: Alexandria, VA
    year: 2013

    To advance and accelerate research and applied human resource policies and practices for human resource professionals and students to identify, understand, and solve workforce aging issues

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Mark Schmit

    With support from this grant, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Foundation will work to accelerate and advance research and applications to understand and solve workforce aging issues in the United States, with a particular emphasis on reaching human resource professionals. SHRM Foundation will pursue multiple strategies related to research, education, and production of materials. They will conduct a review of the relevant economic, legal, and social science literature on older workers and summarize those findings for a non-specialist audience; they will study human resource policy and practice trends related to older workers; and they will develop new tools and programs to incentivize the adoption of best human resource practices with regard to the aging workforce. Expected products include four studies, an Effective Practice Guidelines report, an Aging Workforce Strategies DVE, and executive roundtable event, a webinar series, and an online Resource Guide/Toolkit for HR practitioners.

    To advance and accelerate research and applied human resource policies and practices for human resource professionals and students to identify, understand, and solve workforce aging issues

    More
  • grantee: North Carolina State University
    amount: $547,161
    city: Raleigh, NC
    year: 2013

    To provide new insight into the work life transitions and key retirement-related decisions by older public sector employees

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    This grant supports research by Robert Clark and Melinda Morrill of North Carolina State University that will study the labor market behavior of more than 875,000 public employees in North Carolina. Collaborating with the office of the North Carolina Treasurer, Clark and Morrill will investigate a series of four interrelated questions retirement in the public sector. One, how do older public employees prepare for this transition through saving for retirement? Two, how do older public employees determine their optimal retirement age from their career employer? Three, do those workers retiring from public employment move into complete retirement or extend their working life by seeking post-retirement work elsewhere? Four, how do individuals choose among annuity options within their defined benefit and defined contribution plans? The research plan involves analysis of administrative data, three employee and retirement surveys, and a field experiment that tests how information affects employees’ retirement savings behavior.

    To provide new insight into the work life transitions and key retirement-related decisions by older public sector employees

    More
  • grantee: Fedcap Rehabilitation Services Inc
    amount: $105,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To build an interactive website in order to launch and administer a two-year fellowship work program re-employing older (50+) senior managers in multiple New York City metro area industries

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Joan Biermann

    To build an interactive website in order to launch and administer a two-year fellowship work program re-employing older (50+) senior managers in multiple New York City metro area industries

    More
  • grantee: American Council on Education
    amount: $118,259
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To plan and execute a culminating event for the National Challenge for Higher Education to ensure a diverse and excellent 21st century work force by providing workplace flexibility for faculty at all stages of their careers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jean McLaughlin

    To plan and execute a culminating event for the National Challenge for Higher Education to ensure a diverse and excellent 21st century work force by providing workplace flexibility for faculty at all stages of their careers

    More
  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $125,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To convene a workshop to explore the key stress points in the arc of an academic research career and the impact that policies and practices in each of these areas has on the others

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Kevin Finneran

    To convene a workshop to explore the key stress points in the arc of an academic research career and the impact that policies and practices in each of these areas has on the others

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $322,392
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2013

    To conduct newly-designed field experiments on age discrimination in U.S. labor markets, eliminating potential biases in existing studies, so as to provide policymakers with a firmer basis for understanding age discrimination in hiring

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator David Neumark

    Audit/correspondence (AC) studies are the most frequently used research design for ascertaining the extent of age discrimination in hiring. This design involves submitting nearly identical resumes online to posted job openings. Resumes differ only by the age of the applicant. Discrimination is ascertained if younger applicants get more call-backs than do older ones. This methodology, however, appears likely to generate bias in favor of finding age discrimination. Because resumes give both younger and older applicants the same, low level of experience, the older applicant will appear to have “holes” in her work history that are likely to be viewed unfavorably. On the other hand, perceived (but unmeasured) differences in the human capital investment of older workers might lead employers to prefer older to younger applicants, biasing the result of audit studies in the opposite direction.This grant provides support for two field experiments by David Neumark of the University of California, Irvine aimed at increasing our understanding of the limitations of the audit/correspondence framework. The first will field an audit study where the resumes of older workers are not identical with their younger counterparts, but instead include work experience commensurate with their age. A finding that older workers are still less likely to be called for interviews may better match the legal standard for age discrimination. A second audit study will be fielded for both types of older applicants—those with equal low levels of experience like in past studies, and those with experience commensurate with age. Differential employer response to these resumes will capture differences in indicators of human capital among older workers.

    To conduct newly-designed field experiments on age discrimination in U.S. labor markets, eliminating potential biases in existing studies, so as to provide policymakers with a firmer basis for understanding age discrimination in hiring

    More