Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Boston University
    amount: $50,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2018

    To organize an interdisciplinary conference that will launch the Ecological Forecasting Initiative

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Michael Dietze

    To organize an interdisciplinary conference that will launch the Ecological Forecasting Initiative

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $125,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To provide final support in completing the first phase of a project examining the component costs of battery chemistries and train the next generation of scholars in energy systems analysis

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jessika Trancik

    To provide final support in completing the first phase of a project examining the component costs of battery chemistries and train the next generation of scholars in energy systems analysis

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  • grantee: Johns Hopkins University
    amount: $65,456
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2018

    To assess the completeness and comprehensiveness of existing United States energy infrastructure datasets

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Sarah Jordaan

    To assess the completeness and comprehensiveness of existing United States energy infrastructure datasets

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $165,000
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2018

    To analyze the challenges and opportunities associated with upgrading and transforming high voltage transmission lines as compared with siting new transmission infrastructure

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Granger Morgan

    This grant supports a study examining whether the upgrading of existing electricity transmission lines can obviate the need to build new transmission infrastructure corridors. Under the leadership of Principal Investigator Granger Morgan, the research team will study different transmission line upgrading options, including re-engineering existing transmission lines to improve their carrying capacity or switching from high-voltage alternating current (HVAC) lines to high-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines. Data will be collected from state public utility commissions about proposed or planned transmission line upgrades. This information will then be analyzed using an engineering model of the transmission system to understand which transmission line corridors might be best suited to upgrading or current conversion based on their technical and economic specifications.

    To analyze the challenges and opportunities associated with upgrading and transforming high voltage transmission lines as compared with siting new transmission infrastructure

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $559,435
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To examine the role of technology and knowledge spillovers in the development of novel clean energy technologies

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Venkatesh Narayanamurti

    Innovation in the energy sector often comes from unexpected places, utilizing research on problems or issues that are not directly energy related but that turn out to have application in the energy sector. Understanding these “knowledge spillovers,” as they are called, is critical to gaining a complete picture about how new energy technologies evolve over time. This grant funds a project led by Venkatesh Narayanamurti of Harvard University, Laura Diaz Anadon of the University of Cambridge, and Gabriel Chan of the University of Minnesota to investigate how knowledge spillovers contributed to three different low-carbon technologies—solar photovoltaics, lithium-ion batteries, and solid state lighting. The team will analyze patent data from the PATSTAT database to determine which innovations from other fields have led to significant advancements for the three aforementioned technologies. The researchers will then supplement this patent citation analysis with a bibliometric analysis of academic publications and with additional expert interviews and consultations. The team will then use existing engineering cost models to identify how various innovations from outside the energy sector contributed to cost reductions for each of the three technologies under study. In addition to academic research, the research team will prepare shorter commentaries and policy briefs aimed at informing policymakers and other nonspecialists about research results.

    To examine the role of technology and knowledge spillovers in the development of novel clean energy technologies

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  • grantee: Pecan Street, Inc.
    amount: $1,102,625
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To improve researcher access to critical energy data by enhancing data resolution and granularity, diversifying data linkages, and expanding geographic scope of instrumented homes

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Suzanne Russo

    Pecan Street is an independent nonprofit organization that is a leading provider of high-resolution residential energy use data to the research community. Through its testbed of volunteer instrumented homes, Pecan Street is able to collect disaggregated circuit-level energy use information at 15-minute, 1-minute, and, increasingly, 1-second intervals. This unique data set is then provided free of charge to the academic community, helping facilitate research known as nonintrusive load monitoring (NILM), which allows scholars to disaggregate household-level energy use based on the unique power “signature” of each monitored appliance. Funds from this grant will allow Pecan Street to expand their data collection efforts through three interrelated projects. First, they will increase the number of homes within their existing test-bed in Austin, Texas that collect energy use data at 1-second intervals. Second, they will integrate additional data from Independent System Operators (or ISOs) around the country—information such as wholesale market pricing, forecasting, and generation information—that enriches the energy use data collected from the Pecan Street testbed. Third, Pecan Street will expand the number of instrumented homes in its network, adding in 100 additional homes in both upstate New York and the Bay Area of California.

    To improve researcher access to critical energy data by enhancing data resolution and granularity, diversifying data linkages, and expanding geographic scope of instrumented homes

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $750,375
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To continue support for predoctoral research and training fellowships in energy economics

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Meredith Fowlie

    This grant renews funding for a set of predoctoral fellowships in energy economics. In each of the past three academic years, Meredith Fowlie (University of California, Berkeley) and Ryan Kellogg (University of Chicago) have led a committee that solicits applications and selects a number of young academics for these two-year predoctoral fellowships. Selected fellows are generally in the final two years of their doctoral program and are conducting one or more studies examining different dimensions of the energy system. Previous fellows have come from an array of universities, including the University of Tennessee; University of Wisconsin, Madison; University of California, San Diego; and Cornell University, among others. The announcement for predoctoral fellowship applications is shared widely within the economics community, and the selection committee has received approximately 20 high-quality applicants each year. Funds from this grant will fund an additional two cohorts of three fellows each. In addition to covering stipend and tuition coverage, a small amount of money is provided for purchasing necessary data and for travel to professional meetings.

    To continue support for predoctoral research and training fellowships in energy economics

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $50,000
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To support the 2018 Energy Journalism Workshop in order to inform journalists covering energy and environmental issues of novel research findings

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Thomas Edgar

    To support the 2018 Energy Journalism Workshop in order to inform journalists covering energy and environmental issues of novel research findings

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $10,000
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2018

    To support participation of undergraduate and graduate students at the 2018 Transportation, Economics, Energy and the Environment (TE3) conference

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Ellen Hughes-Cromwick

    To support participation of undergraduate and graduate students at the 2018 Transportation, Economics, Energy and the Environment (TE3) conference

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  • grantee: Center for Strategic and International Studies
    amount: $124,475
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To support research and workshops in the Energy in America project to examine how energy impacts the United States economy at multiple levels and the changing role of energy development on job creation

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Sarah Ladislaw

    To support research and workshops in the Energy in America project to examine how energy impacts the United States economy at multiple levels and the changing role of energy development on job creation

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