Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: American Academy of Arts and Sciences
    amount: $50,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To better understand the benefits and challenges of international science partnerships, including energy and environmental issues, through a workshop and white paper

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator John Randell

    To better understand the benefits and challenges of international science partnerships, including energy and environmental issues, through a workshop and white paper

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  • grantee: International Energy Program Evaluation Conference
    amount: $17,750
    city: Chatham, MA
    year: 2017

    To continue support in accelerating and advancing the profession of energy evaluation by enabling graduate students to attend the 2018 IEPPEC Conference

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Sharyn Barata

    To continue support in accelerating and advancing the profession of energy evaluation by enabling graduate students to attend the 2018 IEPPEC Conference

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $57,524
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2017

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by characterizing profiles of households who fall into financing coverage gaps for energy efficiency programs

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Tony Reames

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by characterizing profiles of households who fall into financing coverage gaps for energy efficiency programs

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  • grantee: Appalachian State University
    amount: $213,254
    city: Boone, NC
    year: 2017

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by examining how behavioral nudges in the form of electronic notifications impact electricity consumption and energy efficiency program participation

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Tanga Mohr

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by examining how behavioral nudges in the form of electronic notifications impact electricity consumption and energy efficiency program participation

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $250,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2017

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by examining the relationship between electricity rate structures and consumer investments in energy efficient appliances

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator David Rapson

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by examining the relationship between electricity rate structures and consumer investments in energy efficient appliances

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $222,289
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2017

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by estimating the impacts of an industrial energy efficiency program on electricity use, water use, and welfare in the agricultural sector

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Maximilian Auffhammer

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by estimating the impacts of an industrial energy efficiency program on electricity use, water use, and welfare in the agricultural sector

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $256,933
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2017

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by studying how changing default participation options in a commercial energy efficiency program impacts program enrollment and energy use

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Katrina Jessoe

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, by studying how changing default participation options in a commercial energy efficiency program impacts program enrollment and energy use

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $299,989
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2017

    To support the Columbia Energy Exchange podcast series to disseminate information and deepen dialogue around energy and environment issues

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jason Bordoff

    This grant provides two years of support for the continued production and improvement of the Columbia Energy Exchange podcast series, produced by Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy (CGEP). Launched in 2015 and hosted by veteran energy journalist Bill Loveless, the 30-minute, weekly podcast features in-depth, one-on-one discussions with top thought leaders in the energy sector. The podcast series has featured an impressive network of leaders from across the energy system, including former government agency heads from the United States and abroad, CEOs of energy companies involved in a wide range of industries (oil, gas, electricity, nuclear, and renewables), and top analysts from energy think tanks, consultancies, and NGOs. Past guests include former Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, Canada’s Minister of Environment Catherine McKenna, Chevron CEO John Watson, and the World Bank’s Head of Energy Riccardo Puliti. The podcast series also features research results from CGEP-affiliated scholars and its weekly release schedule enables CGEP to address topical and relevant energy issues as they rise in the public discourse. Sloan grant support will provide funds for the production of 50 episodes of the series over each of the next two years, allow CGEP to produce transcripts of each episode, and enable necessary technical improvements to upgrade the podcast’s audio quality.

    To support the Columbia Energy Exchange podcast series to disseminate information and deepen dialogue around energy and environment issues

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $271,207
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2017

    To assess the economic, policy, institutional, and technological barriers and opportunities associated with the development and deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration technologies

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator David Victor

    Many analyses examining the transition to a low-carbon energy system in the United States identify carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration (CCUS) technologies as critical in order to make progress toward deep decarbonization. These technologies have proven difficult to develop and scale, however, and much uncertainty remains about the durability and longevity of policies and incentive structures designed to demonstrate their feasibility. Funds from this grant support work by David Victor and his team at the University of California, San Diego to examine the economic, political, institutional, and technological barriers that are impeding the development of CCUS technologies. First, the team will survey the literature and develop a typology of canonical CCUS technology features being used in different CCUS demonstration facilities, such as the adopted method of carbon dioxide sequestration or the planned industrial use of the carbon dioxide byproduct. They will then select a set of demonstration plants that represent a broad array of different CCUS features to study, conducting semi-structured interviews with a wide range of industry leaders, government representatives, scientists, engineers, and non-governmental actors involved in these projects. Their analysis will focus on the regulatory, institutional, and technological barriers and opportunities that have shaped the development of CCUS technologies to date with the aim of extracting relevant lessons that can be learned as this suite of technologies moves ahead. At the end of the project, the UCSD team will organize a structured workshop to review the research results and share findings with the broader community of researchers and practitioners.

    To assess the economic, policy, institutional, and technological barriers and opportunities associated with the development and deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration technologies

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  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $299,574
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2017

    To examine alternative governance approaches and institutions associated with geoengineering research, focusing on solar radiation management field experiments, using participatory deliberation methodologies

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Daniel Sarewitz

    There is a growing debate in the energy and environment community about the role to be played by geoengineering as a response to climate change. Solar radiation management (SRM) technologies, which involve injecting aerosol particles into the atmosphere to cool the Earth by reflecting sunlight, are increasingly central to these discussions. SRM technologies may be developed quickly, have the potential to be relatively inexpensive, and could be easily scaled. However, SRM research and its associated deployment raises many underexplored concerns related to moral hazard, technological uncertainty, unintended externalities, and potential irreversibility. In particular, little is known about the public’s understanding of SRM technologies, their potential concerns, and what procedural and governance safeguards might be put in place to allay them. A multidisciplinary team of scholars at Arizona State University (ASU) proposes to conduct a series of public dialogues with the aim to better understand public views on the development, and deployment of SRM technologies. First, the ASU team will conduct an initial framing and design workshop with subject matter experts to develop rubrics for discussing SRM technologies with the public. Next, they will hold two forums, one in Arizona and the other in Boston, each involving over a hundred members of the lay public. Trained social scientists will lead structured focus groups that will inform participants about SRM technologies and solicit their views and perspectives. Multiple forms of qualitative and quantitative data will be collected throughout the process, including pre- and post- event surveys and interviews. A final expert workshop will then integrate and assess collected data and present findings to policymakers and the research community.

    To examine alternative governance approaches and institutions associated with geoengineering research, focusing on solar radiation management field experiments, using participatory deliberation methodologies

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