Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $90,070
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2016

    To conduct research and organize a conference examining the risks and benefits of solar geoengineering research

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Gernot Wagner

    To conduct research and organize a conference examining the risks and benefits of solar geoengineering research

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  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $10,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To support the 2017 Molly K. Macauley Award for Research Innovation and Advanced Analytics for Policy

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Margaret Walls

    To support the 2017 Molly K. Macauley Award for Research Innovation and Advanced Analytics for Policy

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $91,063
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2016

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on understanding how the targeting and timing of energy efficiency information provision impacts program participation

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Kevin Novan

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on understanding how the targeting and timing of energy efficiency information provision impacts program participation

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  • grantee: Wake Forest University
    amount: $249,933
    city: Winston-Salem, NC
    year: 2016

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on determining how management practices in the industrial sector impact energy efficiency

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Mark Curtis

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on determining how management practices in the industrial sector impact energy efficiency

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  • grantee: Western Washington University
    amount: $309,304
    city: Bellingham, WA
    year: 2016

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on quantifying the impact of energy efficiency on housing values

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Sharon Shewmake

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on quantifying the impact of energy efficiency on housing values

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  • grantee: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    amount: $349,700
    city: Champaign, IL
    year: 2016

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on evaluating the projected and realized savings from the Weatherization Assistance Program

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Erica Myers

    To research the economics of energy efficiency, as recommended by a Request for Proposals review committee, focused on evaluating the projected and realized savings from the Weatherization Assistance Program

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $600,000
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2016

    To develop and apply a framework that classifies, assesses, and compares the explicit and implicit subsidies provided for different energy sources

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Frank Wolak

    Federal and state governments provide a wide array of direct and indirect subsidies to many energy supply technologies. Since these subsidies affect the economic competitiveness of different energy sources, it is important to develop objective and accurate estimates of their magnitude. Funds from this grant support work by Frank Wolak, a senior energy economist at Stanford, to develop a standardized schema for the categorization of different forms of government subsidy. Wolak will then collaborate with other leading energy economists to apply this framework and undertake a series of technology-specific analyses that will quantify the extent of subsidies provided to various energy sources, such as coal, natural gas, oil, wind, solar, and nuclear. All participating researchers will then convene at a workshop to review and compare each of these analyses and suggest areas of improvement. Finally, Wolak will develop a general equilibrium model that extends the results of these source-specific subsidy analyses and accounts for interactions between subsidies for different energy sources. He will consider, for example, how changes in the subsidies provided for wind power impact subsidies provided for other energy sources, such as oil or gas. This general equilibrium methodology will be the subject of a second review workshop, and the whole project will culminate in a series of final conferences that will lay out the ultimate findings for researchers and policymakers.

    To develop and apply a framework that classifies, assesses, and compares the explicit and implicit subsidies provided for different energy sources

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $300,000
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2016

    To curate, merge, anonymize, and examine residential smart meter data in the competitive electricity market areas of Texas

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Michael Webber

    The answers to a host of pressing questions in energy policy, such as how best to help consumers use electricity more efficiently or where to site new electricity distribution infrastructure, depend crucially on a nuanced understanding of how consumers use electricity and how that demand differs from household to household. New opportunities to study differences in household electricity consumption have arisen in recent years thanks to the increasingly widespread installation of smart electricity meters that track household energy use at finely grained intervals, in some cases measuring energy consumption as frequently as every 15 minutes. Partnering with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), Michael Webber, deputy director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas, Austin, plans to explore household electricity usage patterns by integrating ERCOT’s 15?minute residential smart meter data with other relevant data sets, such as local tax records, demographic statistics, meteorological data, and locational marginal pricing information. Webber has identified a set of initial hypotheses to be tested through an examination of the integrated data set, including how energy use varies with income, time of day across different locations in Texas, and the introduction of demand response programs. Funds from this grant will help Webber and his team take in the over 45 terabytes of ERCOT smart meter data, suitably anonymize the data set, merge it with additional information sources, and disseminate it for use by other researchers.

    To curate, merge, anonymize, and examine residential smart meter data in the competitive electricity market areas of Texas

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $350,226
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2016

    To improve the training of energy journalists through an introduction to high quality research in energy economics, geopolitics, and innovation

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jason Bordoff

    This grant funds an annual three-day seminar, hosted by Columbia University’s Center on Global and Energy Policy (CGEP), that aims to train and inform journalists tasked with covering multifaceted developments in energy economics, energy markets, energy geopolitics, and energy innovation. Using active discussion and interactive modules, the seminars will introduce participating journalists to emerging research findings on a broad number of complex topics, including oil price volatility, solar energy, and shale gas development, presented by leading experts from academia, industry, and government. Approximately 15 journalists will be selected to participate each year through a competitive application process and selected participants will be asked to commit to producing a substantial number of articles that reflect the training program’s focus on providing a multidisciplinary view of key energy issues.

    To improve the training of energy journalists through an introduction to high quality research in energy economics, geopolitics, and innovation

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  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $450,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To conduct research on the economics of transportation by studying consumer demand for new vehicle technologies and alternative fuel vehicles

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Joshua Linn

    Transportation accounts for a large fraction of both U.S. petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, and continues to be an important contributor to local concentrations of nitrogen oxide and ozone. This grant funds a project by Resources for the Future (RFF) that will examine and assess consumer demand for low-carbon vehicles, be they electric cars or nonelectric cars with high fuel economy ratings. Partnering with Maritz CX Research, a private market research firm with detailed information on individual consumer purchasing decisions of new vehicles and their attributes, the RFF team will analyze more than five years of records related to how consumers make decisions about vehicle purchases, totaling nearly one million observations of car purchasing decisions. While this remains a small fraction of total domestic car purchases over that time period, the data set is larger and of higher quality than any publicly available data source that has been explored in the transportation economics literature to date. RFF will examine this rich data set by exploring how consumers value low-carbon vehicle attributes, consumer demand for innovations in the electric vehicle market, and the interactions between fuel prices and greenhouse gas mitigation standards that have been set for the transportation sector.

    To conduct research on the economics of transportation by studying consumer demand for new vehicle technologies and alternative fuel vehicles

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