Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $464,800
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2015

    To train the next generation of researchers and practitioners in energy and environmental economics and policy by launching a postdoctoral researcher program

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Margaret Walls

    Funds from this grant support postdoctoral researchers studying energy, natural resource, and environmental economics at the Washington D.C.–based nonpartisan think tank Resources for the Future (RFF). The RFF program has several important strengths. First, supported postdoctoral researchers will split their time between defined projects and independent research, allowing them the opportunity to build the strong list of publications that is vital to securing a longer-term university position. Second, postdoctoral researchers will have the opportunity to build and expand their professional networks in policy, academic, and private sector circles, providing them with a broader range of subsequent career opportunities. Third, researchers will be trained in valuable skills like grant writing, public speaking, presenting material to policy audiences, and event organization, all of which will be critical for their advancement in their careers. Fourth, RFF will draw on a deep roster of senior in-house scholars and its extended network of affiliated university faculty to provide job placement services and career guidance. Fifth, there are no other federally or philanthropically funded energy and environmental economics postdoctoral researcher positions of this kind, making the RFF program unique in the field. Grant funds will provide fellowship and administrative support to the program for a period of three years.

    To train the next generation of researchers and practitioners in energy and environmental economics and policy by launching a postdoctoral researcher program

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  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $608,905
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2015

    To understand the benefits and costs of shale gas and oil development on local communities

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Alan Krupnick

    Funds from this grant support three projects by Resources for the Future (RFF) that aim to improve our understanding of the broad array of local community impacts, both positive and negative, brought on by the extraction of shale gas and oil. In its first project, RFF will develop a comprehensive risk/benefit matrix and community impact framework that will bring together, in one place, a description and assessment of the various impacts that communities may face due to local shale gas extraction, covering everything from increased demands on local water infrastructure to increased traffic and noise. The second project will explore the legal and economic dimensions of private land leasing agreements, exploring the diversity of these agreements and how their differences result in differing consequences for municipalities and their residents. The third project consists of a qualitative exploration of the development of industry-community voluntary practices, protocols, and behaviors that constitute what is often termed the “social license to operate” in different localities. The effort will catalog how individual communities have worked with oil and gas companies to manage the inevitable disruptions caused by local oil and gas extraction. Taken together, the three projects will create a framework that will capture the diversity of local responses to the influx of shale gas developers, provide useful new directions for future scholarship, and give municipalities new resources for how to manage their own local shale gas and oil development.

    To understand the benefits and costs of shale gas and oil development on local communities

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $10,000
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2015

    To support the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center to provide stipends to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and post-doctoral researchers to attend the 2015 Behavior, Energy and Climate Change (BECC) Conference in Sacramento, CA

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator James Sweeney

    To support the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center to provide stipends to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and post-doctoral researchers to attend the 2015 Behavior, Energy and Climate Change (BECC) Conference in Sacramento, CA

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $50,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To continue support for the Center on Global Energy Policy’s external speaker series to inform public debate about critical energy issues

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jason Bordoff

    To continue support for the Center on Global Energy Policy’s external speaker series to inform public debate about critical energy issues

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $75,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To assess the past and present capabilities of the U.S. nuclear energy innovation system

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Richard Lester

    To assess the past and present capabilities of the U.S. nuclear energy innovation system

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $300,000
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2015

    To support Duke University’s Energy Data Analytics Lab to develop and apply advanced data analytics tools that improve understanding about potential energy utilization and responses to various interventions that affect energy utilization

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Richard Newell

    New technologies like real-time electricity meters and smart appliances are generating vast amounts of new, granular data on household energy consumption. This grant supports the Energy Data Analytics Lab (EDAL) at Duke University in its efforts to use this growing body of data to increase our understanding of household energy consumption patterns; evaluate policy interventions designed to curb energy use; and anticipate strains, failures, and bottlenecks in the electricity sector. Planned research topics over the next two years include investigations into how big data can be used to develop accurate baseline assessments of energy resources, how to use remote sensors to estimate the distribution and growth of household solar panels, and how the discovery and extraction of U.S. natural gas deposits are related to price volatility in the natural gas market. Additional grant funds support a host of outreach and community-building activities by the EDAL, including the hosting of a workshop on advanced energy data analytics, the construction of a web portal to make EDAL research, data, and methods easily available to other researchers, and the training of undergraduate and graduate students through lectures, classroom modules, and laboratory assignments.

    To support Duke University’s Energy Data Analytics Lab to develop and apply advanced data analytics tools that improve understanding about potential energy utilization and responses to various interventions that affect energy utilization

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $530,060
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2015

    To examine the hydrological characteristics of five major shale gas and shale oil regions, including understanding environmental impacts on regional water resources and induced seismicity effects from wastewater disposal

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Bridget Scanlon

    This grant provides partial support to a research project by the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas, Austin. A multidisciplinary team of hydrologists, geologists, economists, and engineers led by geologist Bridget Scanlon will analyze the hydrological characteristics and wastewater production of five major shale oil and gas plays across the country. Using data on previous drilling at each play, the team will construct historical wastewater production estimates and then use these baseline analyses to forecast future water use and wastewater volumes. The team will then compare how water needs associated with shale drilling compare to other water demands in different regions and then estimate the potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on contributing to water scarcity in these areas. Additional work will focus on gaining a better scientific understanding of increased seismicity induced by the injection of wastewater into disposal wells.

    To examine the hydrological characteristics of five major shale gas and shale oil regions, including understanding environmental impacts on regional water resources and induced seismicity effects from wastewater disposal

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $250,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2015

    To study the technological, economic, and environmental trade-offs associated with the use of natural gas as a low-carbon transportation fuel option in the United States

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Amy Jaffe

    This grant supports a multidisciplinary research effort led by the Institute for Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis (ITS-Davis) to examine natural gas as an alternative fuel option to power trucks, other long-haul vehicles, municipal bus and taxi fleets, and light-duty passenger vehicles. Bringing together leading economists, engineers, geographers, policy experts, and computer scientists, ITS-Davis will organize a workshop on the issue and commission a series of papers providing a comprehensive overview of the tradeoffs associated with the use of natural gas as an alternative fuel in the transportation sector. Data from the workshop will then be used to enrich ITS-Davis’s model of the infrastructure and refueling network that must sustain any transition to natural gas as an alternative fuel. Working closely with researchers at Arizona State University, ITS-Davis also plans to expand its model to accommodate changes in diesel and natural gas fuel prices, alternative technology costs, various rates of new vehicle diffusion, altered traffic flow patterns, and changes to state-level policies.

    To study the technological, economic, and environmental trade-offs associated with the use of natural gas as a low-carbon transportation fuel option in the United States

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  • grantee: Syracuse University
    amount: $48,900
    city: Syracuse, NY
    year: 2015

    To provide partial support for a study examining how consumers perceive privacy risks associated with smart grid and home energy technologies

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jason Dedrick

    To provide partial support for a study examining how consumers perceive privacy risks associated with smart grid and home energy technologies

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $20,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2015

    To provide partial support for the formation of a multi-sectoral Roundtable on Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development to gather and critically examine the scientific, engineering, regulatory, and environmental dimensions of unconventional hydrocarbon development

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Elizabeth Eide

    To provide partial support for the formation of a multi-sectoral Roundtable on Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development to gather and critically examine the scientific, engineering, regulatory, and environmental dimensions of unconventional hydrocarbon development

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