Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: WGBH Educational Foundation
    amount: $100,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2010

    To develop a screenplay about physicist Lise Meitner for a financing package leading to a theatrical feature film and/or a television broadcast

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Paula Apsell

    This grant to the WGBH Educational Foundation provides development funds for a screenplay about physicist Lise Meitner, who, with Otto Hahn, did the critical research leading to the discovery of nuclear fission, but who was excluded from the Nobel Prize that went to Hahn. Funds will go towards hiring a professional screenwriter to work with the director on the project and for a financing package that will enable a theatrical release and television broadcast on PBS's NOVA.

    To develop a screenplay about physicist Lise Meitner for a financing package leading to a theatrical feature film and/or a television broadcast

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  • grantee: Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation
    amount: $150,318
    city: Brookline, MA
    year: 2010

    To support screenings and discussion of science films at art house theaters across the country

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Denise Kasell

    This grant provides support to the Coolidge Corner Theater, regularly voted the best movie theater in Boston and boasting a national reputation, as it continues its pioneering Science on Screen series and expands the series to movie theaters across the country. The Science on Screen series is notable because-in addition to screening traditional Sloan-style science films like Primer, 2001: A Space Odyssey and A Brief History of Time-it takes non-scientific movies like American Beauty, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Fight Club and shines a serious scientific lens on major themes in these films, following each showing with in-depth discussions led by working scientists. At the Arthouse Convergence, a major meeting of Art House theater professionals held in advance of the Sundance Film Festival, Coolidge plans to make a formal presentation and hold a Science on Screen workshop, distributing the syllabus, showcasing videos of speakers, discussing programming ideas, and exploring potential marketing and audience development tactics. This effort is an experiment that seeks to build on build on Coolidge's existing successes and scale them up in a meaningful way.

    To support screenings and discussion of science films at art house theaters across the country

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  • grantee: Hamptons International Film Festival
    amount: $527,456
    city: East Hampton, NY
    year: 2010

    To commission and spotlight science and technology films and to develop science and technology screenplays

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Karen Arikian

    This grant provides support to the The Hamptons International Film Festival (HIFF), for continued development of its activities in the Sloan Film program. HIFF activities consist of a $25,000 annual feature film prize with multiple screenings, a panel with filmmakers and scientists, a reception, and an intensive screenwriting workshop with staged readings of works-in-progress at the festival. Previous Foundation support of HIFF has resulted in an impressive roster of Sloan-winning films and directors, including Darren Aronofsky, Julian Schnabel, Michael Apted, Bill Condon and Marc Abraham, all of whom participated-in person, on video or via letter-at the festival's tenth anniversary tribute to the accomplishments of the Sloan partnership in 2009. Funds from this grant will ensure continuation of this successful partnership through the next three years.

    To commission and spotlight science and technology films and to develop science and technology screenplays

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  • grantee: Tribeca Film Institute
    amount: $192,784
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To create a two-year pilot to establish an annual Sloan Grand Jury Prize for the Best Student Science Screenplay and to develop this script through the Tribeca/Sloan Filmmaker Fund

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Beth Janson

    This grant to the Tribeca Film Institute will fund a pilot program to establish an annual Grand Jury Prize award for the single best student screenplay among the Foundation's six film school partners and to develop that script towards production. The aim of the award is to stimulate greater interest and excitement among the participating film schools and film students by awarding a "best of the best" prize and by fast-tracking the winning project for development so it becomes a major career opportunity for the winner. If successful, the award promises to lift the visibility and prestige of both of the winning filmmaker, his school, and the Sloan Film program as a whole.

    To create a two-year pilot to establish an annual Sloan Grand Jury Prize for the Best Student Science Screenplay and to develop this script through the Tribeca/Sloan Filmmaker Fund

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  • grantee: American Museum of the Moving Image
    amount: $239,631
    city: Astoria, NY
    year: 2010

    To showcase award-winning student films and to maintain a go-to site for all Sloan film and television projects and for all Sloan Film Program participants

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Carl Goodman

    This grant supports the continued operation of the Sloan Science and Film website, scienceandfilm.org. Hosted and operated by the American Museum of the Moving Image (MoMI), America's leading film museum, the site showcases student films produced by the Foundation's film school partners and provides a synopsis of all film projects under development with the Foundation's six film school and four film festival partners, promoting the Sloan Film program while serving as a key resource for program participants. The MoMI website remains an essential component of the Sloan Film program and the nearest thing to one-stop shopping for those seeking to learn about the program in all its aspects. The site has approximately 50 award-winning Sloan films available in their entirety for live streaming, making it an up-to-date showcase and a constantly evolving cinematheque for science film shorts. In addition, the site has an interactive directory that lists and describes every winning student screenplay and film, and includes every film project under development with our four main partners: Sundance, Hamptons, Tribeca and Film Independent. The MoMI Sloan Science and Film website remains a unique, state-of-the art feature that very few non-profit programs, or even for-profit film companies, can boast.

    To showcase award-winning student films and to maintain a go-to site for all Sloan film and television projects and for all Sloan Film Program participants

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $45,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To develop a web site for Science and Entertainment Exchange

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Barbara Pope

    To develop a web site for Science and Entertainment Exchange

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  • grantee: American Film Institute
    amount: $270,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by the top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Joe Petricca

    This is a three-year renewal grant from the American Film Institute (AFI), one of the nation's leading film schools, to continue awarding tuition stipends, screenwriting and production awards for Science and Technology (S&T) films and to hold an annual S&T seminar. The film school program, supported for over a decade now, has been successful as measured by both quantity and quality of work. Beyond that, it is the cornerstone of our broader film program because it has created a growing body of work-and an emerging cadre of talented filmmakers-all focusing on S&T films. AFI has a unique status as a national film conservatory and their finished Sloan films, such as Skylab and The Monster and the Peanut, traditionally have the best production values and the most sophisticated "look" of all Sloan films. AFI has been very sensitive to the economic situation and this request is substantially lower than their previous request. The Foundation has supported this work at the American Film Institute since 1996 with total grants of $1,301,275.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by the top film students

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  • grantee: Tribeca Film Institute
    amount: $700,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To develop new science and technology feature films for production and to showcase science and technology films and hold panels at the Tribeca Film Festival

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Beth Janson

    The Tribeca Film Institute (TFI) requests two more years of support for the TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund and Retrospective Screening and Discussion Series. Our early partnership with Jane Rosenthal and Robert De Niro at the Tribeca Film Festival-of which we were founding sponsors-has yielded several high profile projects that helped establish our film credibility. Tribeca has shrewdly begun pulling together the most promising Sloan projects from other programs, as well as developing its own, to give us the strongest suite of film projects we've ever had. One example is Face Value-the Hedy Lamar story which originated at Tribeca, then went to the Hamptons and came back for a second Tribeca grant last year. It was at our Tribeca selection committee meeting that committee member Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream, The Wrestler) read Face Value and recommended his wife, Academy Award-winning actress Rachel Weisz, for the role of Hedy. By attracting people of Aronosky's caliber onto our committees-Marc Abraham (Children of Men, Flash of Genius), Sarah Green (Frieda, Girlfight), John Hart (Proof, Revolutionary Road), Caroline Baron (Capote)-Tribeca has catapulted Sloan into a front row industry seat. Face Value is slated to shoot in January 2010. $280,000 of this request would go directly to filmmakers, one reason for this program's effectiveness. Tribeca is an extremely strong performer, the lynch?pin of our screenplay development efforts, and is a well-regarded, high profile component of the Sloan Film Program. In addition to supporting the Tribeca Film Institute with its screenwriting development program, the Foundation has supported every Tribeca Film Festival since its inception in 2002, with total grants of $2,548,200.

    To develop new science and technology feature films for production and to showcase science and technology films and hold panels at the Tribeca Film Festival

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $309,750
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Etana Jacobson

    This is one of a trio of three-year renewal grants from the nation's leading film schools to continue awarding screenwriting and production awards for science and technology films and to hold an annual science and technology seminar. Many producers are now combing through all the Sloan student winners for new scripts. Our 2008 Sloan Summit, which showcased the work of student winners, attracted executives from the major studios and independent film companies. University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), which had some earlier issues due to personnel changes, has made great strides during the past three years. In the last cycle, UCLA turned in the best performance of any Sloan film school, including two outstanding scripts (The Magic Pill; The Ten Commandments of Leo Szilard). Several Sloan films UCLA submitted to festivals across the country have won awards and one production (Death Strip) took home a Student Emmy. UCLA is now next in line should we support another first feature production grant. While UCLA has increased its film production grants to offset rising production costs and added a modest stipend for more science advisors, it has compensated for these increases with other cuts so there is no net budget increase from 2006.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

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  • grantee: University of Southern California
    amount: $325,611
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Michael Renov

    This is one of a trio of three-year renewal grants from the nation's leading film schools to continue awarding screenwriting and production awards for science and technology films and to hold an annual science and technology seminar. Many producers are now combing through all the Sloan student winners for new scripts. Our 2008 Sloan Summit, which showcased the work of student winners, attracted executives from the major studios and independent film companies. University of Southern California (USC) is the oldest film school in the country and consistently competes with New York University for the ranking of number one film school in the nation. It boasts the biggest program among our six schools and is also the only one that gives out a Sloan animation prize. USC has very strong ties with the industry and active alumni involved with the school include George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Robert Zemeckis. USC graduates have done well in securing industry jobs and enjoy the benefits of a very strong network. USC has been very sensitive to the economic situation and this request is $5,000 lower than the previous request in 2006.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

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