Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: The New School for Social Research
    amount: $960,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To provide New York City parents, particularly those in underserved communities, with information and data needed to make sound choices about their children’s education, especially in science, mathematics, economics, and computer science

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Clara Hemphill

    This grant supports the continued operation and administration of InsideSchools.org, a public website that provides comprehensive information on New York City’s 1,700 public schools, including photos and videos of the school, student achievement statistics, course offerings, and reviews compiled by independent reviewers from on-site visits. Grant funds provide three years of core operational support as well as planned efforts to improve the site’s search capabilities and accessibility via smartphones and other mobile devices. In addition, the grant provides resources to help the site develop and implement plans for long-term financial sustainability.  

    To provide New York City parents, particularly those in underserved communities, with information and data needed to make sound choices about their children’s education, especially in science, mathematics, economics, and computer science

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  • grantee: Business-Higher Education Forum
    amount: $650,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2015

    To support the New York City (NYC) Data Science Task Force as it leads the planning, design, and implementation of new partnerships, pathways, and learning opportunities in data science and analytics at the undergraduate level

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Isabel Cardenas-Navia

    Funds from this grant support an initiative by the Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) to expand the number of NYC metro area institutions involved in educating undergraduates to become data scientists and data science–enabled professionals. Over the next four years, BHEF will convene and support the NYC Data Science Task Force of approximately 40 representatives from academic institutions, corporations, cultural and research organizations, and government agencies; convene two working groups, one aimed at mapping the skills, competencies, and knowledge needed for data scientists and one on developing a repository of undergraduate data science curricular resources; partner with NYC institutions to create data-science-focused courses, concentrations, and minors; work with industry partners to create high-quality internships and other student work experiences in data science and create guidelines and best practices for the creation of these experiences; and disseminate lessons learned to the broader educational community.  

    To support the New York City (NYC) Data Science Task Force as it leads the planning, design, and implementation of new partnerships, pathways, and learning opportunities in data science and analytics at the undergraduate level

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  • grantee: Fund for Public Health in New York, Inc.
    amount: $1,044,516
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To evaluate and validate the use of social media for foodborne outbreak detection

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Romy Basil

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) estimates that more than 1,000 restaurant-associated outbreaks of foodborne illness occur in the city each year. Outbreaks are usually reported by the victims themselves via telephone calls to 311 or the health department. Most victims don’t bother, however, and as a result the DOHMH detects only about 30 outbreaks each year. Since quickly detecting foodborne illness outbreaks is critical to implementing control measures in time to protect the public, better detection measures are needed. This grant funds a project by the Fund for the City of New York, in collaboration with the DOHMH and researchers at Columbia University to experiment with using Twitter and other social media to detect unreported instances of restaurant-related foodborne illness. The theory is that while people may be unlikely to report a foodborne illness to the health department, they are much more likely to tweet or post to Facebook about it. Real-time analysis of public data from Twitter and other social media sites may be able to reliably inform health department officials of outbreaks as they are happening. Over the next three years, the FCNY team will develop algorithmic methods for searching Twitter feeds, identifying tweets potentially relevant to foodborne illness outbreaks in NYC, and then evaluate the reliability of those algorithms in detecting actual outbreaks. Additional grant funds support efforts to increase voluntary reports of foodborne illness outbreaks by allowing NYC residents to report illness directly through Twitter. The project is experimental, but the prospective gains are large. Even a small increase in the ability to detect restaurant-related foodborne illness outbreaks would represent a significant improvement of current detection capabilities.

    To evaluate and validate the use of social media for foodborne outbreak detection

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $22,611
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To provide partial support for the Computer Science for Cyber Security summer program for High School women

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Nasir Memon

    To provide partial support for the Computer Science for Cyber Security summer program for High School women

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $64,951
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To develop strategies to improve emergency preparedness at NYC schools

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Jeff Schlegelmilch

    To develop strategies to improve emergency preparedness at NYC schools

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  • grantee: Fund for the City of New York
    amount: $780,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Mary McCormick

    Each year since 1973, the Sloan Public Service Awards have recognized six outstanding civil servants out of the hundreds of thousands of people who work for New York City government. The Fund for the City of New York manages the nomination and selection process and refers to the awards as “the Nobel Prizes of Government…, the highest award that can be bestowed upon a New York City public servant.” Nominated by their colleagues and selected by a blue-ribbon panel of distinguished New Yorkers, each of the six winners receives a $10,000 cash prize and is honored at individual celebrations at their workplaces and at a city-wide celebration presided over by the Mayor. This grant provides three years of continued support for the Sloan Public Service Awards.

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

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  • grantee: Council for Economic Education
    amount: $163,980
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To promote economics education in New York area schools by recognizing innovative teachers and promoting their methods

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Christopher Caltabiano

    This grant provides two years of continued support for the administration of the Sloan Teaching Champion Awards, an annual awards program run by the Council for Economic Education that recognizes outstanding financial and economics education by secondary school teachers in the New York City metropolitan area. Winners are selected by an independent committee based on a number of diverse factors, including their effectiveness, creativity, and success in motivating underserved students. Winners receive a $5,000 cash prize, $2,500 to be used to augment economic education programs at their respective schools, and are honored at a high-profile event in New York City.

    To promote economics education in New York area schools by recognizing innovative teachers and promoting their methods

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $125,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To provide renewed support for a cyber security lecture series in New York City

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Robert Ubell

    To provide renewed support for a cyber security lecture series in New York City

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  • grantee: New York Hall of Science
    amount: $75,000
    city: Corona, NY
    year: 2014

    To establish the new Alan J. Friedman Center for the development of young scientists

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Priya Mohabir

    To establish the new Alan J. Friedman Center for the development of young scientists

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $709,654
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To identify, motivate, and nurture mathematical talent through after-school activities in New York City's underserved neighborhoods

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Selin Kalaycioglu

    The Center for Mathematical Talent (CMT) was established in 2010 at New York University's prestigious Courant Institute for Mathematics.  Its mission is to identify, motivate, and nurture those underserved and underrepresented students in New York City schools who could excel in mathematics.  This grant provides three years of continued support for the activities of the CMT, including partnering with other educational organizations to set up satellite programs for students unable or unwilling to travel to Manhattan, training public school teachers and others to run extracurricular programs like “math circles,” and developing educational materials, like math games, designed to present mathematics in ways that are challenging, fun, and engaging.  In addition, CMT plans over the next three years to double the numbers of students and instructors reached; diversify its sources of support; restructure its website to better serve its core audiences, and refine its data collection procedures so as to better measure program impact.

    To identify, motivate, and nurture mathematical talent through after-school activities in New York City's underserved neighborhoods

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