Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $20,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To provide partial support for the Cyber Security Program for High School Women

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Nasir Memon

    To provide partial support for the Cyber Security Program for High School Women

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  • grantee: American Regions Mathematics League
    amount: $10,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To support the participation of New York City Math Team students in the American Regions Mathematics League annual competition

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Linda Berman

    To support the participation of New York City Math Team students in the American Regions Mathematics League annual competition

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $250,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To determine the microflora of mice in proximity to densely populated and high-traffic areas in New York City

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator W. Lipkin

    Infectious disease expert Ian Lipkin, M.D., the John Snow Professor of Epidemiology and Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University studied the microbial profiles of 133 rats in lower Manhattan and determined that they harbor multiple human pathogens.  This grant supports Lipkin as he expands this study to mice.  Lipkin will examine the microflora of 100 mice from each of 16 densely populated areas of New York City in order to determine what bacteria, fungi, and viruses are present in native NYC mice and whether the distribution of these microoganisms  differ by borough, season, or socioeconomic status of the surrounding human population.  The project has the potential to identify both known and novel pathogens in rodent vectors, provide insights into otherwise unexplained diseases by revealing links to infection with rodent-borne pathogens, and build support for rodent control.  The new knowledge will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at scientific and medical meetings.

    To determine the microflora of mice in proximity to densely populated and high-traffic areas in New York City

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  • grantee: Fund for the City of New York
    amount: $1,425,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To provide renewed support for the Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and Science in New York City Public High Schools

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Mary McCormick

    This grant provides five years of continued support to the Fund for the City of New York for the administration of the Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics, an annual awards program that honors exceptional math and science teaching in New York City’s public high schools. Selected by a distinguished independent committee of scientists, educators, and civic leaders, each of seven yearly awardees receive $5,000 with an additional $2,500 going to his or her school to strengthen its science and mathematics program. Grant funds support the administration of the awards, selection of candidates, press and media outreach, and an annual ceremony honoring the winners.

    To provide renewed support for the Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and Science in New York City Public High Schools

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  • grantee: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    amount: $3,000,000
    city: Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    year: 2013

    To provide start-up funds for Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's (CSHL) new DNA Center in New York City

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator David Micklos

    The DNA Learning Center, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, is the world’s largest provider of student lab instruction in molecular genetics, operating six teaching laboratories in Cold Spring Harbor, Lake Success, and Harlem. More than 265,000 precollege students have conducted hands-on experiments at DNA Learning Center locations since its first teaching lab opened, and each year about 30,000 New York area students receive science enrichment during half-day field trips, in-school visits, and week-long DNA camps administered by the Center.   The Center has also popularized several useful methods for delivering laboratory instruction in genetics to large numbers of teachers and students—including equipment-sharing consortia, mobile vans to carry instructional labs to remote sites, and laboratory field trips.This grant provides partial support for the opening of a new DNA Learning Center location in New York City. The new location will bring high-quality molecular genetics education to an estimated 45,000 New York City students annually, and will provide significant educational opportunities to low-income, minority, and underserved student populations.

    To provide start-up funds for Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's (CSHL) new DNA Center in New York City

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $200,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To conduct planning activities for four projects at the Center for Urban Science and Progress

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Aristides Patrinos

    In 2012, New York University established the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP), a new center dedicated to conducting research and education in the emerging field of urban informatics. Using vast data sets and new tools and strategies, CUSP plans to address the critical challenges facing cities, including infrastructure, technology integration, energy efficiency, transportation congestion, public safety, and public health. Funds from this grant provide support for the planning of four major CUSP projects: the Quantified Community project, which aims to fully instrument a section of the city to acquire and use the data collected by sensors as well as other data streams; the Urban Microbiome project, which aims to study the city’s microbiological ecosystems; the Urban Observatory project, which aims to develop and deploy new sensor technologies around the city; and the Data Warehouse project, which aims to construct a pioneering computing center to facilitate the storage, management, curation, analysis, and use of urban informatics data. Grant funds will support planning of these four projects, the production of white papers examining benefits, costs, and potential obstacles, and the production of a detailed project timelines, budgets, and workplans.

    To conduct planning activities for four projects at the Center for Urban Science and Progress

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $210,450
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To study flood insurance, including the uptake, distributional, and incentive effects of Super Storm Sandy

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Richard Revesz

    This grant supports the research of New York University professor Richard Revesz, who is studying the effects of the National Flood Insurance Program, which provides subsidized flood insurance to at-risk communities in exchange for implementing floodplain management ordinances that would make future construction less vulnerable to the damage caused by flooding. Revesz will investigate a series of interrelated issues, including who primarily benefits from the program, how it affects construction decisions, how to estimate costs and benefits, and what “moral hazard” or “adverse selection” problems the program creates. Particular emphasis will be based on investigating consumer, government and firm behavior in the wake of Superstorm Sandy, which caused massive flooding in the New York City metropolitan area in 2012.

    To study flood insurance, including the uptake, distributional, and incentive effects of Super Storm Sandy

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $124,308
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To study the accessibility and effectiveness of programs for gifted and talented students offered by New York City’s Department of Education

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator James Kemple

    To study the accessibility and effectiveness of programs for gifted and talented students offered by New York City’s Department of Education

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  • grantee: The New School for Social Research
    amount: $710,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To identify, profile, and help inform choices among exemplary mathematics and science programs in New York City schools

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Andrew White

    InsideSchools.org is a comprehensive source of information on New York City schools visited by over 140,000 students, parents, educators, and members of the public each month. Its user-friendly website offers detailed profiles of New York’s 1,700 schools, including in-class videos, student achievement statistics, and insights gained from on-site visits. News and advice columns also cover everything from entrance tests to new administrative appointments. To ensure access by diverse demographic groups, the entire site can be immediately translated into 50 different languages. The Sloan Foundation has supported InsideSchools since its inception in 2002.Funds from this grant support efforts by InsideSchools to expand its offerings by providing information about the different pedagogical and curricular offerings at each school, such as Everyday Math, TERC, Saxon, Singapore, or Montessori. In a separate effort to improve data quality, InsideSchools will also begin consulting with a statistician to help separate school effects from small sample biases or other confounding variables.

    To identify, profile, and help inform choices among exemplary mathematics and science programs in New York City schools

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  • grantee: Council for Economic Education
    amount: $150,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To promote economics education in New York area schools by recognizing innovative teachers and promoting their methods

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Christopher Caltabiano

    This grant provides two years of support for a new awards program by the Council for Economic Education (CEE) that honors exceptional, innovative K-12 teaching of economics and finance in the New York Metropolitan Area. These “Economic Educator of the Year Awards” will be awarded by a distinguished independent committee to three K-12 teachers based on evidence of their creativity, general effectiveness, and success at motivating underserved students.Winners will be honored at the CEE annual dinner, where a video will also be shown that highlights their achievements and showcases their teaching methods. Each winner receives a $5,000 prize and their schools will receive $2,500 to strengthen its economic education offerings.

    To promote economics education in New York area schools by recognizing innovative teachers and promoting their methods

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