Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Fund for the City of New York
    amount: $750,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Mary McCormick

    This grant provides three years of support for the continued operation of the Sloan Public Service Awards. Administered by the Fund for the City of New York since 1973 and supported by the Sloan Foundation since 1985, these annual awards honor exceptional civil servants working in New York City municipal government. Each of the six yearly winners receive a $10,000 award and is honored both in a ceremony at his or her workplace and in a city-wide celebration presided over by the Mayor. Grant funds will support the administrative costs of the program for three years, including the selection process, nominee vetting, press outreach, event planning, and award monies.

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

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  • grantee: Polytechnic Institute of New York University
    amount: $124,993
    city: Brooklyn, NY
    year: 2011

    To support a pilot project for a cyber security lecture series in New York City

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Robert Ubell

    To support a pilot project for a cyber security lecture series in New York City

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  • grantee: Research Foundation of the City University of New York
    amount: $1,075,968
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To encourage and support promising early career scientists at both student and faculty levels through two awards programs: a Summer Undergraduate Research program and a Junior Faculty Fellowship program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Gillian Small

    Funds from this grant support two programs at the City University of New York aimed at supporting faculty and students in STEM disciplines. The first, CUNY's Summer Research Program, provides interested undergraduates with the opportunity to engage in hands-on, in-the-lab science, assisting CUNY science faculty with ongoing research projects during the summer. Grant funds will support 10 students in each of 2012, 2013, and 2014, providing a housing allowance and a living stipend. The second supported program under this grant is CUNY's Junior Faculty Fellowship Program, which aims to support promising early-career STEM faculty at CUNY by providing a $50,000 fellowship for use in research. Over the course of the next three years, eight faculty will receive fellowships through this grant.

    To encourage and support promising early career scientists at both student and faculty levels through two awards programs: a Summer Undergraduate Research program and a Junior Faculty Fellowship program

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  • grantee: George Mason University
    amount: $379,704
    city: Fairfax, VA
    year: 2011

    To provide updated software, data, and education that facilitate public participation in the redistricting of New York State

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Michael McDonald

    This grant provides funds for a project by George Mason University to facilitate use of District Builder, a free, open-source software platform that allows citizens to draw, share, and submit their own congressional redistricting maps, in New York State. Partnering with New York's Fordham University, the George Mason team will further develop and improve the District Builder platform, populate it with relevant demographic and legal data specific to New York, launch and maintain a public website to host the District Builder platform aimed at New York residents, and engage in a series of educational and outreach initiatives, including a Fordham-sponsored competition that will encourage students to submit redistricting maps drawn using District Builder and have their submissions ranked against a set of objective, measurable criteria, with the winning map to be submitted to the New York State legislature for consideration in its redistricting decisions.

    To provide updated software, data, and education that facilitate public participation in the redistricting of New York State

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  • grantee: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    amount: $300,000
    city: Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    year: 2010

    To support a pilot project for DNA barcoding experiments by New York City high school students

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator David Micklos

    Funds from this grant support a team at the Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory to conduct a pilot program-called DNA Barcode New York City (DNAbcNYC)-to bring DNA barcoding to New York City high school students through DNALC's facility in East Harlem. The DNALC-started in 1988-is the world's first science center devoted entirely to genetics education. The DNAbcNYC team plans a pilot program to get New York City high school students-especially those underrepresented in science-to use DNA barcoding to explore their urban environment. They plan to organize student work around several key campaigns that encourage a coordinated effort to sample the biodiversity of urban ecosystems around the city, including city parks and gardens, neighborhood markets, and detecting food fraud. The project includes support for teacher training in DNA barcoding, student teams, a dedicated DNAbcNYC micro-site, kits and supplies, assistance for in-school DNA barcoding "footlocker kits," and a new Urban Barcode Competition. Using methods established by DNALC, the students will collect samples, extract DNA, and then amplify it using the appropriate primers (CO1 for animals, rbcL for plants). The amplified DNA will be shipped to a vetted sequencing lab, where the barcode sequence will be determined. The sequences will be uploaded to a new dedicated DNAbcNYC micro-site where the sequence data can be accessed and analyzed. The micro-site will support all phases of the DNAbcNYC project. The site will include video instructions, online lab notebook, downloadable lab protocols, teacher preparation, multimedia resources, a barcode sequence database, and a suite of simplified bioinformatics tools. Novel sequences will be submitted to the Barcode of Life database. The teachers and students will be invited to participate in the Urban Barcode Competition. The top three teams will be awarded cash prizes. In addition, the top three projects will be subjects of videos posted on DNAbcNYC's micro-site as well as on Cablevision's MSG Varsity Channel. The DNAbcNYC expects to reach at least 300 students in this pilot, assuming each trained teacher engages one team of three students. The project represents a unique opportunity to bring the excitement of scientific discovery through DNA barcoding to New York City high school students.

    To support a pilot project for DNA barcoding experiments by New York City high school students

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  • grantee: Fund for Public Health in New York, Inc.
    amount: $1,250,058
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To improve NYC's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's syndromic surveillance systems

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Marcelle Layton

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) is a world leader in the use of electronic data for disease surveillance. The syndromic surveillance systems maintained by the Bureau of Communicable Disease process nearly four million emergency department encounters, 1.5 million calls for emergency medical service ambulance dispatch, 14 million pharmacy transactions, and over one million school health nurse visits annually. Sloan provided early support in 2002 ($700,000) and 2003 ($697,000) to the New York Academy of Medicine to help the NYC Department of Health to develop and disseminate the SATSCAN syndromic surveillance software which was very successful. Since that time, new tools and methods applicable to syndromic surveillance have been developed elsewhere, and NYC DOHMH would like to put them into practice. Funds from this grant will allow NYC DOHMH to make their system "state of the art", share their improvements with other public health departments across the country, and expand the applicability of electronic data for disease surveillance by incorporating novel statistical approaches and additional data streams for outbreak and cluster detection. Over the next three years, the NYC DOHMH team will conduct three main activities. First, they will review the literature of recent research and syndromic applications in other local jurisdictions. Second, they will analyze and evaluate select statistical methodologies that can be applied to existing data to determine if they prove more useful and informative for disease surveillance. Third, they plan to apply selected methodologies to everyday practice and prepare a user's guide-a basic how-to guide-that includes their code and examples of data visualizations.

    To improve NYC's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's syndromic surveillance systems

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $124,338
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To document and build on the history of the Science Honors program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Allan Blaer

    To document and build on the history of the Science Honors program

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  • grantee: Neil D. Levin Institute
    amount: $80,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    On behalf of the Neil D. Levine Institute for support for Innovate New York: Media and Communications

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Thomas Moebus

    On behalf of the Neil D. Levine Institute for support for Innovate New York: Media and Communications

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  • grantee: Advocates for Children of New York, Inc.
    amount: $1,150,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To generate and disseminate information for parents about New York City schools

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Kim Sweet

    The website InsideSchools.org provides independent information about New York City schools and the New York City Department of Education, providing helpful information to parents trying to navigate the public school bureaucracy, journalists writing about education, social workers trying to place students in appropriate schools, and teachers looking for jobs. Funds from this grant support InsideSchools in its continuing efforts to compile accurate, professional, and current reviews of the more than 1,500 New York City public schools.

    To generate and disseminate information for parents about New York City schools

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $708,468
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To establish a Center for Mathematical Talent to work with students from NYC schools

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Yuri Tschinkel

    In recent years, programs to indentify and nurture talent in science and mathematics among NYC schoolchildren have largely disappeared. Funds from this grant will support The Courant Institute for the Mathematical Sciences at New York University (NYU) in its efforts to launch a new Center for Mathematical Talent (CMT) to address precisely this problem. Courant is one of the premier mathematical institutions in the world, and can build on its established record of success with gifted and talented schoolchildren. Outreach for the new Center will specifically target women, underrepresented minorities, and disadvantaged students who may not otherwise know about or pursue opportunities to develop their potential.

    To establish a Center for Mathematical Talent to work with students from NYC schools

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