Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $176,062
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2011

    To support a pilot study to examine the microbial profiles found in the air, water, and surfaces of a neonatal intensive care unit and compare them to the microbial profiles from the gut of premature infants

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jillian Banfield

    Babies are born sterile. The microbial ecosystem that thrives on and inside each of us-stomach bacteria that help us digest food, for instance-are acquired post-birth, presumably through contact with our mothers. But what of babies born prematurely, separated from their mothers, and treated in sterile neonatal intensive care units? How do these infants acquire the microbes needed to survive outside the womb? This grant supports the research of UC, Berkeley professor Jill Banfield, who is investigating this very question. In a one-year pilot study with collaborator Dr. Michael Morowitz of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Banfield will examine the microbial profiles of the air, water, and surfaces of a neonatal intensive care unit and compare the profiles to those found in the gut of three premature infants staying in the ICU. Using modern molecular tools, the research team will analyze the microbial profiles of the neonatal intensive care unit environments over time and space to potentially identify the sources of microbes involved in infant gut colonization.

    To support a pilot study to examine the microbial profiles found in the air, water, and surfaces of a neonatal intensive care unit and compare them to the microbial profiles from the gut of premature infants

    More
  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $248,854
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2011

    To provide renewed support to examine the sources and character of airborne bacterial and fungal particles in the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jordan Peccia

    This two-year grant to Yale University provides support to Professors Bill Nazaroff and Jordan Peccia to continue their ongoing work characterizing airborne microbial populations of indoor environments. The team will study the size distributions of bioaerosols from the indoor environment under occupied and unoccupied conditions. They will examine the sources, origins, and population characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi in indoor settings that are attributable to human occupancy and collect and analyze air and dust samples from 10 different indoor environments-all elementary schools in the U.S., Germany, and China. Collected samples will help shed light on how airborne bacteria and fungi differ from other airborne particulate matter, how internal physical processes in indoor environments shape bacterial and fungal size distributions, and the role human occupants play in shaping microbial populations in indoor air.

    To provide renewed support to examine the sources and character of airborne bacterial and fungal particles in the indoor environment

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  • grantee: University of Ottawa
    amount: $599,150
    city: Ottawa, ON, Canada
    year: 2011

    To provide renewed support to develop fungal barcodes and use them to explore the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Keith Seifert

    This two-year grant will support an ambitious research agenda spearheaded by Dr. Keith Seifert of the University of Ottowa, and Dr. Robert Samson of the Dutch Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures to use advanced DNA sequencing technology to further advance our understanding of fungi and the role they play in the microbial ecosystems of indoor environments. Supported activities include the analysis of more than 6,000 new fungal cultures to provide detailed DNA sequence and taxonomic information, which Seifert and Samson expect to result in the discovery of 50 to 100 new species of fungi. In addition, Seifert and Samson will conduct further research on identifying regions of fungal DNA that can be appropriately used for species identification, as the current DNA region used for identification is effective in distinguishing only 72% of known fungal species. Funds from this grant will also support the education and training of one graduate student and two postdoctoral fellows.

    To provide renewed support to develop fungal barcodes and use them to explore the indoor environment

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  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $141,450
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2011

    To fund a pilot project to examine the microbiome associated with surfaces in the home

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jack Gilbert

    Different parts of the body have different microbial profiles. The microorganisms that thrive in our underarms are different from those that live on our hands, which are different, in turn, from those that live on our scalp. Funds from this grant support a project by the University of Chicago's Jack Gilbert to investigate how these unique microbial profiles interact with the microbial populations of surfaces in the indoor environment. Gilbert will examine the microbial profiles associated with the dominant hand, the gut, and heel pad from 20 individuals in 10 homes. He will then compare these profiles to those found on door knobs, kitchen surfaces, bedroom and bathroom floors, and light switches following a move into a new home. These profiles will be examined every day for two weeks prior to moving and four weeks after moving to a new home, shedding light on whether the microbes found on people are transferred to the surfaces of their homes and, if so, whether the transferred microbes thrive in the new environments they find themselves in.

    To fund a pilot project to examine the microbiome associated with surfaces in the home

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $124,121
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2011

    To conduct a pilot study to examine the diversity and structure of bacterial communities in kitchens

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Noah Fierer

    This grant will fund the efforts by Noah Fierer, a young researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder, to examine the diversity and structure of microbial communities in kitchens. Fierer-in collaboration with his colleague Rob Knight-plans to collect samples from twelve residential kitchens to determine the geographical distribution of microbial communities and to track the movements of the communities across kitchen surfaces. He plans to collect samples from a number of kitchen surfaces before and after meal preparation and collect samples from a variety of foods that were used to prepare the meal. DNA will be isolated from the samples and then amplified, sequenced, and analyzed using bio-informatic tools.

    To conduct a pilot study to examine the diversity and structure of bacterial communities in kitchens

    More
  • grantee: San Diego State University
    amount: $125,000
    city: San Diego, CA
    year: 2011

    To conduct a pilot study to examine workplace environments using viral metagenomic analysis

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Scott Kelley

    To conduct a pilot study to examine workplace environments using viral metagenomic analysis

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  • grantee: Marine Biological Laboratory
    amount: $459,918
    city: Woods Hole, MA
    year: 2010

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Mitchell Sogin

    One of the objectives of the Foundation's Indoor Environment program is to improve the cohesiveness of the community and its ability to communicate internally and externally by developing data visualization and imaging techniques and repositories. This grant to the Marine Biological Laboratory supports a joint project with the University of Chicago, the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Colorado, Boulder to develop MoBE DAC, a data analysis core for the Indoor Environment program. The overarching goal for this collaborative effort is to provide tools and a data archive for analyzing molecular sequence data and for visualizing ecological and functional similarities between microbial communities in the indoor environment. The team plans to integrate the functional capabilities of the websites of MG-RAST, VAMPS, QIIME, and the genome database, FungiDB, through a common database structure. This project will facilitate comparisons of molecular ecology data and contextual information across laboratories and study sites, providing a platform for accelerating publication of results and training of students for environmental microbiology laboratories.

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    More
  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $1,094,203
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2010

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Folker Meyer

    One of the objectives of the Foundation's Indoor Environment program is to improve the cohesiveness of the community and its ability to communicate internally and externally by developing data visualization and imaging techniques and repositories. This grant to the University of Chicago supports a joint project with the University of California, Riverside, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the University of Colorado, Boulder to develop MoBE DAC, a data analysis core for the Indoor Environment program. The overarching goal for this collaborative effort is to provide tools and a data archive for analyzing molecular sequence data and for visualizing ecological and functional similarities between microbial communities in the indoor environment. The team plans to integrate the functional capabilities of the websites of MG-RAST, VAMPS, QIIME, and the genome database, FungiDB, through a common database structure. This project will facilitate comparisons of molecular ecology data and contextual information across laboratories and study sites, providing a platform for accelerating publication of results and training of students for environmental microbiology laboratories.

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    More
  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $450,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2010

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Robin Knight

    One of the objectives of the Foundation's Indoor Environment program is to improve the cohesiveness of the community and its ability to communicate internally and externally by developing data visualization and imaging techniques and repositories. This grant to the University of California, Boulder supports a joint project with the University of Chicago, the University of California, Riverside, and the Marine Biological Laboratory to develop MoBE DAC, a data analysis core for the Indoor Environment program. The overarching goal for this collaborative effort is to provide tools and a data archive for analyzing molecular sequence data and for visualizing ecological and functional similarities between microbial communities in the indoor environment. The team plans to integrate the functional capabilities of the websites of MG-RAST, VAMPS, QIIME, and the genome database, FungiDB, through a common database structure. This project will facilitate comparisons of molecular ecology data and contextual information across laboratories and study sites, providing a platform for accelerating publication of results and training of students for environmental microbiology laboratories.

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Riverside
    amount: $750,000
    city: Riverside, CA
    year: 2010

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jason Stajich

    One of the objectives of the Foundation's Indoor Environment program is to improve the cohesiveness of the community and its ability to communicate internally and externally by developing data visualization and imaging techniques and repositories. This grant to the University of Chicago supports a joint project with the University of California, Riverside, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the University of Colorado, Boulder to develop MoBE DAC, a data analysis core for the Indoor Environment program. The overarching goal for this collaborative effort is to provide tools and a data archive for analyzing molecular sequence data and for visualizing ecological and functional similarities between microbial communities in the indoor environment. The team plans to integrate the functional capabilities of the websites of MG-RAST, VAMPS, QIIME, and the genome database, FungiDB, through a common database structure. This project will facilitate comparisons of molecular ecology data and contextual information across laboratories and study sites, providing a platform for accelerating publication of results and training of students for environmental microbiology laboratories.

    To provide tools and a data archive for analyzing sequence data of microbial communities in the indoor environment

    More