Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $140,000
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2017

    To develope predictive model systems of polymicrobial biofilm formation and susceptibility to chemical disinfectant:  A longitudinal study with implications for spaceflight systems integrity and health risks

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Cheryl Nickerson

    To develope predictive model systems of polymicrobial biofilm formation and susceptibility to chemical disinfectant:  A longitudinal study with implications for spaceflight systems integrity and health risks

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  • grantee: University of Hawaii
    amount: $120,000
    city: Honolulu, HI
    year: 2017

    To characterize the fungal communities captured by the air filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, one of the most remote locations on earth

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Laura Tipton

    To characterize the fungal communities captured by the air filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, one of the most remote locations on earth

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  • grantee: Michigan State University
    amount: $120,000
    city: East Lansing, MI
    year: 2016

    To support Jean Pierre Nshimyimana in studying the role of the virome in the microbiological stability of the aquatic built environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Joan Rose

    To support Jean Pierre Nshimyimana in studying the role of the virome in the microbiological stability of the aquatic built environment

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  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $40,481
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2016

    To examine how surface finishes impact the indoor microbiome and their collection of antibiotic resistant genes

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Erica Hartmann

    To examine how surface finishes impact the indoor microbiome and their collection of antibiotic resistant genes

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $75,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To provide partial support for a consensus study on the management of legionella in water systems

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Laura Ehlers

    To provide partial support for a consensus study on the management of legionella in water systems

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  • grantee: University of Tulsa
    amount: $99,960
    city: Tulsa, OK
    year: 2016

    To develop a MoBE research roadmap to transition from basic research to practical applications

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Richard Shaughnessy

    To develop a MoBE research roadmap to transition from basic research to practical applications

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  • grantee: Ohio State University
    amount: $50,142
    city: Columbus, OH
    year: 2016

    To support a pilot study to establish methods and feasibility for determining how diurnal variation in relative humidity affects microbial communities in carpet

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Karen Dannemiller

    To support a pilot study to establish methods and feasibility for determining how diurnal variation in relative humidity affects microbial communities in carpet

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, Baltimore
    amount: $249,289
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2016

    To support a scientific meeting celebrating the accomplishments of the MoBE program in 2017

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Lynn Schriml

    Funds from this grant support MoBE 2017, a two-day Microbiology of the Built Environment Research and Applications Symposium to be held October 11–12, 2017 at the U.S. National Academies in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the symposium is to engage and inform potential funders and community stakeholders by highlighting research findings, identifying intersections with stakeholder missions, and showcasing a National Academies consensus study, Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, which documents the state of knowledge on the microbiome/built environment interface, identifies knowledge gaps, and sets out a list of prioritized areas for future research. Each day of the symposium will include one keynote speaker and four themed sessions. Topics to be discussed include the nexus of microbial exposure and building design, public health and indoor microbial communities, manipulating microbiome composition through architectural choices and material selection, and potential applications of indoor microbial research. A total of 160 guests are expected, including researchers, journalists, industry representatives, and policymakers from state, federal, and international government bodies. MoBE 2017 promises to be an important capstone event for the Foundation’s MoBE program as we near the end of planned grantmaking in 2017. If successful, it will engage and inform potential funders and community stakeholders from government agencies, philanthropic organizations, and companies, while celebrating the scientific achievements of the program.

    To support a scientific meeting celebrating the accomplishments of the MoBE program in 2017

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $255,734
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2016

    To conduct a case study of how hidden spaces in a portable classroom building influence the indoor microbiome as a function of building ventilation and operation

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Kerry Kinney

    There are nearly 600,000 portable classrooms across the country. These “temporary” structures are plagued with problems: poor ventilation, water intrusion, high levels of formaldehyde, and insufficient building maintenance. The problems are particularly worrisome given that recent studies have shown that poor indoor air quality can reduce cognitive performance. This grant funds a team led by Professor Kerry Kinney at the University of Texas, Austin, to construct a case study examining how “hidden spaces” in a temporary-yet-permanent building influence the indoor microbiome. Hidden spaces like ceiling plenums and crawl spaces can be important vectors for the spread of microbes indoors. Dark, moist, and infrequently cleaned, such spaces often contain high levels of contaminants, which may subsequently be spread throughout the building by drafts. Studying actual portable classrooms, Kinney and her team plan to identify where microbes and other contaminants come from and where they go within classroom and hidden spaces, and then determine how positive and negative pressurization from ventilation systems affects the microbiota and other contaminants in various parts of the portable classroom The researchers will share their findings by publishing in building science, life science, and trade journals; in web posts; and by using social media to direct readers to these postings. The team will also make presentations at national and international meetings. Both a graduate student and a postdoctoral fellow will be trained in indoor microbiome and building science studies during the research.

    To conduct a case study of how hidden spaces in a portable classroom building influence the indoor microbiome as a function of building ventilation and operation

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $249,999
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2016

    To determine the metabolic activity of host- and environmentally-derived microbes in the public transportation microbiome

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Curtis Huttenhower

    Urban transportation systems have been studied as vectors for the transmission of infectious disease, but their role in moving harmless microbes among hosts is largely unknown. This grant funds a project by Curtis Huttenhower, associate professor of computational biology at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and associate member of the Broad Institute, to determine the metabolic activity of host- and environmentally derived microbes in the public transportation microbiome and reconstruct associated biochemical pathways. Huttenhower’s study will determine the degree to which transit-associated microbial communities are functionally active as well as the basic microbial biochemical processes by which they persist in situ and (re-) transmit to and from human hosts. The team plans to share functional data and metadata through open access repositories. Manuscripts will be made open access whenever possible, and all software will be made freely available open source commensurate with the lab's existing work. The team expects to publish at least two papers and present the work at two conferences.

    To determine the metabolic activity of host- and environmentally-derived microbes in the public transportation microbiome

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