Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, San Francisco
    amount: $300,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2013

    To examine the house dust fungal microbiome

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Susan Lynch

    This grant supports the expansion of a major $9 million, multi-institutional research project funded by the National Institute of Health. The NIH study aims to determine the bacterial community composition of 340 paired house dust and infant stool samples in a case cohort epidemiological study. Sloan funds will enable the research team to expand their analysis to not just bacteria, but fungi. Led Dr. Susan Lynch of the University of California, San Francisco, the research team will perform high resolution fungal community profiling of the 340 paired samples, conduct a variety of statistical analyses to determine whether relationships exist between fungal and bacterial community composition in house dust and infant stool, and use multivariate regression analysis to relate fungal/bacterial house dust microbiome composition to measure house characteristics and allergic disease outcomes to identify key factors that influence the home and infant stool microbiome and are related to human health status.

    To examine the house dust fungal microbiome

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $49,336
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2013

    To examine how building moisture influences fungal and bacterial ecology in house dust

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jordan Peccia

    To examine how building moisture influences fungal and bacterial ecology in house dust

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  • grantee: Harvard Medical School
    amount: $125,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2013

    To test whether the pH of surfaces in built environments influences the composition of microbial communities that reside there

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Roberto Kolter

    To test whether the pH of surfaces in built environments influences the composition of microbial communities that reside there

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  • grantee: University of Pittsburgh
    amount: $33,000
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2013

    To determine the changes in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system caused by the introduction of a secondary disinfectant

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Kyle Bibby

    To determine the changes in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system caused by the introduction of a secondary disinfectant

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  • grantee: American Association for the Advancement of Science
    amount: $57,595
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To support a one?-day symposium on Microbiology of the Built Environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Mark Milutinovich

    To support a one?-day symposium on Microbiology of the Built Environment

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $195,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To provide partial support for the Forum on Microbial Threats

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Eileen Choffnes

    The Forum on Microbial Threats (Forum) was created in 1996 to address emerging, re-emerging, and novel infectious diseases and has become one of the leading places to address issues in microbial ecology and microbiology. The Forum gathers experts, develops agendas, conducts three meetings and two symposia per year, and publishes reports. Funds from this grant provide partial support to the Forum over a three-year period. Among the planned topics for future workshops and symposia is "The Movement of Microorganisms and the Microbial Ecology of the Built Environment", a workshop of interest to the Foundation's Microbiology of the Built Environment Program and one that will help set the stage for future efforts towards a full National Academies' study and report on the microbiology of built environments.

    To provide partial support for the Forum on Microbial Threats

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $66,371
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2012

    To support a meeting on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Craig McClain

    To support a meeting on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $850,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2012

    To analyze the neonatal intensive care unit room environment as a source of microorganisms colonizing the gastrointestinal tract of premature infants

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jillian Banfield

    This grant supports efforts by Jill Banfield of the University of California, Berkeley and Michael Morowitz, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 's Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh to study how premature infants-born sterile, separated from their mothers, and isolated in neonatal intensive care units" (NICUs)-nevertheless develop intestinal microbiota necessary for normal human digestion. Preliminary studies suggest that infants acquire the needed microbes from microbes in the NICU, and Banfield, Morowitz and their team will explore that hypothesis. They will conduct comprehensive, next generation high resolution ecological surveys of hospital air and surfaces to link them with microbial colonization of the infant GI tract. The project will involve building a mathematical model for simulating microbial transport within the NICU, which will be used to interpret collected date and make predictions about the efficacy of future interventions.

    To analyze the neonatal intensive care unit room environment as a source of microorganisms colonizing the gastrointestinal tract of premature infants

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  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $856,900
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2012

    To characterize the surface, air, water and human-associated microbial communities in two hospitals to monitor changes following the introduction of patients and staff

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jack Gilbert

    Funds from this grant support a research project by University of Chicago microbiologist Jack Gilbert and Chicago surgeon John Alverdy, to study microbial populations at a newly constructed hospital at the University of Chicago. By studying the characteristics of microbial populations before and after the hospital becomes operational, the project will shed light on how the introduction of doctors, nurses, patients, and visitors, staff change the microbes that live and thrive in hospital environments. Using a multidisciplinary team that includes microbial ecologists architects, building scientists, statisticians, and epidemiologists, Gilbert and Alverdy will take nearly 13,000 microbial samples and analyze them to investigate whether microbial community structure on hospital surfaces can be predicted by human demographics, physical conditions and/or building materials; how patient-room microbiota is influenced by the current patient, his length of stay, and/or the introduction of a new patient; how the colonization of surfaces by pathogens of surfaces is sped or impeded by existing microbial communities on those surfaces, and how the rate of change in a microbial community is affected by building materials and human use. The team plans to publish at least three articles on their research in peer-reviewed journals, and their findings may be of use to the health care community, leading to better patient care through crafting a more complete understanding of how microorganisms spread through hospitals.

    To characterize the surface, air, water and human-associated microbial communities in two hospitals to monitor changes following the introduction of patients and staff

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  • grantee: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    amount: $250,000
    city: Blacksburg, VA
    year: 2012

    To determine the effects of pipe materials, water flow, and chemistry on the building plumbing microbiome

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Amy Pruden

    To determine the effects of pipe materials, water flow, and chemistry on the building plumbing microbiome

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