Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Community Initiatives
    amount: $248,729
    city: Oakland, CA
    year: 2021

    To build an inclusive and diverse instructor community around teaching foundational data literacy skills for conducting efficient, open, and reproducible research

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Kari Jordan

    To build an inclusive and diverse instructor community around teaching foundational data literacy skills for conducting efficient, open, and reproducible research

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  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $86,000
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2021

    To drive the definition and adoption of FAIR principles for research software

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Michelle Barker

    To drive the definition and adoption of FAIR principles for research software

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  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $36,850
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2021

    To advance understanding of the economics of open infrastructure maintenance and sustainability, by examining the themes of system interoperability, distributed governance, and collective funding

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Kaitlin Thaney

    To advance understanding of the economics of open infrastructure maintenance and sustainability, by examining the themes of system interoperability, distributed governance, and collective funding

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  • grantee: Open Collective Foundation
    amount: $605,000
    city: Walnut, CA
    year: 2020

    To support research and implementation projects on the maintenance of open source digital infrastructure

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Alyssa Wright

    To support research and implementation projects on the maintenance of open source digital infrastructure

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $150,000
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2020

    To develop a model for archiving and curating the complex, multimodal materials generated in the field of robotics

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Brian Mathews

    To develop a model for archiving and curating the complex, multimodal materials generated in the field of robotics

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $451,242
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2020

    To understand various influences on the contributor trajectories of women in open source software projects, including attention to the unique role of maintainers and a pilot focused on the experiences of U.S.-born Black women

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Laura Dabbish

    This grant provides funding to extend a project by Laura Dabbish of Carnegie Mellon University to study women’s participation in open source software projects. Combining qualitative interviews with network analysis of large-scale project data from GitHub, Dabbish broadens the definition of “participation” beyond code commits, cataloged the various ways software projects telegraph openness to new contributors, and hypothesized that gendered difference in the social network structures men and women create explain why women on average disengage from open source participation earlier than men. Grant funds will allow Dabbish to expand her work to other open source software ecosystems while also probing the gender dynamics of “maintainers,” those leaders in open source projects responsible for the technical and social “invisible work” that holds a project together. In addition, Dabbish and her partners will pilot an extension of their methods to the study of other underrepresented minorities in open source, starting with the experience of U.S.-born Black women contributors.

    To understand various influences on the contributor trajectories of women in open source software projects, including attention to the unique role of maintainers and a pilot focused on the experiences of U.S.-born Black women

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  • grantee: Rochester Institute of Technology
    amount: $499,121
    city: Rochester, NY
    year: 2020

    To pilot a student-anchored model supporting faculty open source software needs and build capacity at the Rochester Institute of Technology Open Source Projects Office

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Stephen Jacobs

    Open source software (OSS) is an increasingly vital component of the scientific research enterprise, used in one form or another at every point in the research pipeline, from instrument calibration, to data collection and cleaning, to analysis and visualization, to archiving.  The centrality and importance of OSS has led to the realization within academic institutions of the need for formal mechanisms to identify and support those OSS projects most central to its researchers.  One model being explored is the creation of university Open Source Programs Offices (OSPO), special intra-university bodies charged with the support of important open source software.    This grant funds an innovative OSPO-like effort at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), led by Steven Jacobs.  The initiative, called Open@RIT, helps university researchers secure funding for OSS work, enlists undergraduates to work directly with RIT faculty on OSS projects, collects data on faculty involvement with OSS, and supports the creation of documentation and other resources that are essential to effective OSS projects.  Grant funds will support the salary of an office staff member to provide administrative support as well as funding for a pool of undergraduate students who wish to work on faculty OSS projects. The grant will help the Open@RIT effort grow, build relationships across the university, and publicize dependence of many campus activities on open source software.  The team also plans to develop a playbook for other institutions interested in launching similar efforts on their own campuses.

    To pilot a student-anchored model supporting faculty open source software needs and build capacity at the Rochester Institute of Technology Open Source Projects Office

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $50,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2020

    To study how new computational techniques move from open source communities into academic research

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Tuan Do

    To study how new computational techniques move from open source communities into academic research

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  • grantee: NumFOCUS
    amount: $379,500
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2020

    To mature and generalize open source tools that support the peer review and publishing of scientific software

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Arfon Smith

    The Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS) is a peer-reviewed academic journal that specializes in the publication of articles about open source scientific research software.  In JOSS, authors can submit a software project along with a description of its scientific use, capacities, limitations, the technical resources required to deploy it, how to access it, and its associated technical documentation.  Following submission, a ’software-native’ review (on GitHub) workflow enables community members to perform code review as well as review documentation and associated metadata. Once published, scientists who use, reuse, adapt, or modify a piece of JOSS-published software in their own research can then cite the JOSS Document Object Identifier (DOI), giving recognition to the software’s developers and creating corresponding professional incentives for scientists to contribute to the development of open source research software.  Funds from this grant support efforts to allow JOSS to better serve its authors and readers through improving and documenting a number of elements of the JOSS technical platform as well as generalizing the software review components for peer review of software outside of JOSS. Funded activities include planned improvements to the “bot” that automates much of the coordination and technical checking of software submitted to the journal, as well as the creation of developer guides, deployment recipes, and a reviewer management system.  The underlying JOSS infrastructure is itself an open source project, allowing other organizations interested in conducting automated software review to benefit from the JOSS team’s work.  

    To mature and generalize open source tools that support the peer review and publishing of scientific software

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $750,000
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2020

    To expand emulation and software preservation infrastructure in order to ensure that software and software-dependent digital content is accessible by future generations

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Euan Cochrane

    By combining archived software code with information on the operating system, application, drivers and other information about the computational environment in which a software program was originally run, The Emulation as a Service Infrastructure (EaaSI) can trick software into thinking it’s being run on the hardware for which it was built.  The result is a sort of software time machine, allowing historians and researchers to interact with decades old software just as users at the time interacted with it.  Even better, EaaSI’s emulations require no special equipment to execute.  Anyone with a web browser can connect to and use the service.  Funds from this grant, led and administered by Yale University Library (along with partner funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation), support the continued expansion and development of the EaaSI ecosystem.  Planned activities include the introduction of new features, like the ability to model networked resources within emulated software and the emulation of mobile phone and tablet apps, as well efforts to grow the number of institutions hosting EaaSI nodes and to provide enhanced training and documentation for users.

    To expand emulation and software preservation infrastructure in order to ensure that software and software-dependent digital content is accessible by future generations

    More
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