Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Johns Hopkins University
    amount: $350,000
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2020

    To pilot an Open Source Contributor Fund and build capacity at the Johns Hopkins University Open Source Projects Office

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator G. Choudhury

    Open source software (OSS) is an increasingly vital component of the scientific research enterprise, used in one form or another at every point in the research pipeline, from instrument calibration, to data collection and cleaning, to analysis and visualization, to archiving.  The centrality and importance of OSS has led to the realization within academic institutions of the need for formal mechanisms to identify and support those OSS projects most central to its researchers.  One model being explored is the creation of university Open Source Programs Offices (OSPO), special intra-university bodies charged with the support of important open source software.    This grant provides funding for the Open Source Contributor Fund at the Johns Hopkins University, a pilot initiative designed to enhance and deepen the university’s support for and engagement with faculty working on open source software projects.  Spearheaded by Associate Dean for Research Management G. Sayeed Choudhury out of the university’s new Open Source Programs Office, the Fund will make small grants of $10,000 to those open source software projects deemed to be most important to campus researchers.  The 16 projects supported over the grant period will be selected through a combination of voting and data analysis of research software dependencies. In addition to surfacing appropriate projects for support, the nomination and voting process will be used to canvass the use, development, and maintenance of open source software across Johns Hopkins. Choudhury and his team will also produce a playbook and other open source tools for use by other institutions who wish to implement similar programming in support of open source development.

    To pilot an Open Source Contributor Fund and build capacity at the Johns Hopkins University Open Source Projects Office

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $196,990
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2020

    To improve the reproducibility of computational research through the development of standards for container metadata, code metrics, and automated research software revision tools

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Merce Crosas

    To improve the reproducibility of computational research through the development of standards for container metadata, code metrics, and automated research software revision tools

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  • grantee: Council on Library and Information Resources
    amount: $33,500
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2020

    To support the extension of data and software curation postdoctoral fellowships, in order to develop emerging leaders in the field and build capacity within academic libraries

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Charles Henry

    To support the extension of data and software curation postdoctoral fellowships, in order to develop emerging leaders in the field and build capacity within academic libraries

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  • grantee: Inria Fondation
    amount: $199,629
    city: Paris, France
    year: 2020

    To extend the coverage of the Software Heritage archive of source code

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Roberto Di Cosmo

    To extend the coverage of the Software Heritage archive of source code

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  • grantee: SUNY Polytechnic Institute
    amount: $599,641
    city: Albany, NY
    year: 2020

    To support and extend a movement that advocates for the importance of maintenance of technology

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Andrew Russell

    L Less heralded than innovation or the creation of new technologies is the maintenance of technological systems: the sometimes unsexy but always vital work of keeping these systems running over time. Maintainers update older systems to be interoperable with newer ones, find and fix bugs, develop and install patches to ensure security and stability, and scan the horizon for new threats to the continued operation of the system. This grant provides three years of funding to The Maintainers, a network of scholars and practitioners devoted to providing support to those involved in the maintenance of critical technological and social systems.  Founded in 2015 and directed by Andrew Russell (SUNY Polytechnical Institute), Jessica Meyerson (Educopia Institute) and Lee Vinsel (Virginia Tech), the Maintainers holds conferences and workshops, connects practitioners and researchers, develops and disseminates best practices, and advocates for the essential social role played by maintainers and their work.  Grant funds will be used over the three year grant period for a number of activities to help build and strengthen the maintainer community, including numerous virtual and in-person events, the creation of two new discipline-specific maintenance subcommunities, the development of new tools and infrastructure for use by the community, and the creation of a strategic plan focused on long-term sustainability.

    To support and extend a movement that advocates for the importance of maintenance of technology

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  • grantee: University of Missouri, Columbia
    amount: $899,876
    city: Columbia, MO
    year: 2020

    To support continued development and adoption in research and practice of open source software community health metrics

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Sean Goggins

    In 2016, the Foundation first funded the Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software (CHAOSS) project, led by information scientists Sean Goggins and Matt Germonprez, at the University of Missouri and the University of Nebraska at Omaha (respectively). The CHAOSS project focuses on the development of metrics, software, and practices to improve the transparency of open source community health. With respect to metrics, the CHAOSS project advances open source community health with respect to project evolution, risk, value, and diversity, equity, & inclusion.  With respect to software, the CHAOSS project uses the Augur software developed through this funding to analyze activity logs, and draw comparisons across entire software ecosystems, and identify anomalies within and across projects using machine learning and AI in an explicitly ethical manner. This enables community stakeholders to make judgements about the health of open source communities and projects using a combination of their own knowledge, and the metrics, data analysis, and insights generated through CHAOSS and Augur. Demand for CHAOSS has been substantial, and the program is seeing use by a number of key players in the open source development space, including partners from both academe and practice. The project has also become essential infrastructure for academic studies of open source practices as well as a source of metrics for research software assessment.  This grant provides three years of support for the continued development and expansion of the CHAOSS project.  Grant funds support the ongoing development and maintenance of the CHAOSS metrics and software and the hiring of additional support staff, as well as a set of specific projects in diversity, equity, & inclusion, open science, journalism, and ensuring the safety of critical systems and infrastructure.  Other grant funds will advance the development of funding models to facilitate the long-term, sustainable operation of the project.

    To support continued development and adoption in research and practice of open source software community health metrics

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  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $50,000
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2019

    To establish a network aimed at integrating and expanding open infrastructure initiatives

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Kaitlin Thaney

    To establish a network aimed at integrating and expanding open infrastructure initiatives

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  • grantee: University of California, Santa Barbara
    amount: $115,115
    city: Santa Barbara, CA
    year: 2019

    To document and study the histories of the R and Python programming languages

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Dan Sholler

    To document and study the histories of the R and Python programming languages

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  • grantee: Princeton University
    amount: $143,191
    city: Princeton, NJ
    year: 2019

    To establish and strengthen professional networks of research software engineers in the United States

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Ian Cosden

    To establish and strengthen professional networks of research software engineers in the United States

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  • grantee: NumFOCUS
    amount: $30,000
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2019

    To partially support participation in the 2019 NumFOCUS Project Sustainability Summit

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Leah Silen

    To partially support participation in the 2019 NumFOCUS Project Sustainability Summit

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