Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Open Collective Foundation
    amount: $50,000
    city: Walnut, CA
    year: 2020

    To support open source software organizations that have suffered losses due to pandemic-related event cancellations

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Duane O'Brien

    To support open source software organizations that have suffered losses due to pandemic-related event cancellations

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  • grantee: Yarn Labs
    amount: $150,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2020

    To design and prototype a model for an AI Bias Bounty system

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Joy Buolamwini

    To design and prototype a model for an AI Bias Bounty system

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $249,998
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2020

    To support the discovery and iterative use of machine learning models through improvements to the AI Model Share platform

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Michael Parrott

    To support the discovery and iterative use of machine learning models through improvements to the AI Model Share platform

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  • grantee: University of Montreal
    amount: $333,960
    city: Montreal, Canada
    year: 2020

    To study and give greater clarity to the categorization of predatory publishing in science

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Kyle Siler

    Fraudulent journals charging fees to publish works by academic authors without checking the submitted articles for quality or legitimacy and without providing editing, review, or other services provided by more legitimate journals, is commonly known as “predatory publishing.”  Predatory journals deliver little to no value to their authors and flood the scientific corpus with poorly-vetted, seldom-cited articles. This grant funds research led by Kyle Siler at the Universitй de Montrйal to study predatory academic journals.  Starting with journals in a set of widely-circulated lists of predatory publishers, Siler and colleagues will begin by refining a definition of “predation”ѕ;the diverse variety of legitimate journal practices makes precise definition controversialѕ;and then compare articles published in predatory and non-predatory venues through a set of lenses: inclusion in vetted databases, citation, full-text analysis, authorship, and variability within publication. Siler and his team will produce peer-reviewed papers as well as briefings for scientific stakeholders. In addition, the researchers will release the first open-access, article-level dataset on the “dark web” of seldom-indexed illegitimate and/or quasi?illegitimate academic journals.

    To study and give greater clarity to the categorization of predatory publishing in science

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  • grantee: Gathering for Open Science Hardware
    amount: $574,770
    city: Hudson, NY
    year: 2020

    To support community events and new models for developing open scientific hardware

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Shannon Dosemagen

    The Gathering for Open Science Hardware (GOSH) is a community of professional and citizen scientists, educators, and other open science enthusiasts that are working to advance discovery through leveraging the scientific opportunities created by open hardware.  Funds from this grant provide two years of support for GOSH’s core community-building and development activities.  Funded activities include planning and hosting of the GOSH annual meeting, development of a model for regional and topic-focused GOSH events, outreach to university administrators and other potential funders, and a “collaborative development program” that would seek to support open hardware projects through an experimental combination of online project development with time-bounded in-person intensive collaboration.

    To support community events and new models for developing open scientific hardware

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $1,999,053
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To study and build a research community around the genesis of data used to train and evaluate the performance of AI systems

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Jason Schultz

    Artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms are being built and trained to perform a wide variety of tasksСrecognizing faces, identifying objects in photos, processing natural language by extracting concepts from text. Once a system is built and trained, however, how do we know how well it performs relative to other such systems? How do we know if the data used to train the system reflect the context in which the system will be used? To answer these questions, we need to scrutinize the training datasets that are used to construct AI systems, and the benchmarking datasets against which these systems are assessed. This grant supports work by Meredith Whittaker and Kate CrawfordСthe co-founders of the AI Now Institute at New York UniversityСand NYU Law professor Jason Schultz. Over the course of three years, Whittaker, Crawford, Schultz, and their team will dig deeply into the history, design, and technical details of some of the most foundational AI datasets, investigating where they came from, how they have evolved, and how they have been used over time. They will use these findings to catalyze a broader conversation about how to understand and appropriately govern the AI systems that are informed by these datasets. The grant outputs will include multiple papers produced for both academic and lay audiences, visualizations of the provenance and uses of specific datasets, and workshops that will bring together the growing community of researchers studying the data that underpins AI research.

    To study and build a research community around the genesis of data used to train and evaluate the performance of AI systems

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  • grantee: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    amount: $650,001
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To understand the current capacity and future potential for low-cost hardware to accelerate science and broaden participation in scientific research

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Anne Bowser

    This grant funds a project by Anne Bowser, Director of Innovation at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, to conduct a comprehensive review of the use of low-cost, including open source, hardware in scientific research. Open hardware refers to the licensing of the design specifications of a physical object in such a way that the described object can be created, modified, used, or distributed by anyone. Open hardware sensors or other instruments present an attractive opportunity to expand the frontiers of scientific research by dramatically lowering the costs of instrumentation. Despite this promise there is, as yet, no comprehensive account of the full range of low-cost and open source hardware solutions; how hardware is being used by researchers and public policy communities; what, if any problems have arisen for those using open hardware related to data quality, governance, and standards; and what institutions and norms are needed to encourage adoption. Bowser and her team will conduct a wide-ranging review of low-cost hardware and the open hardware movement, combining broad landscape synthesis and convenings with commissioned reports on critical issues like data quality, governance, and the relationship between open hardware and other open paradigms.

    To understand the current capacity and future potential for low-cost hardware to accelerate science and broaden participation in scientific research

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  • grantee: Data & Society Research Institute
    amount: $225,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To better understand ways that the legitimacy of data can be called into question through historical case studies of the US Census

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator danah boyd

    To better understand ways that the legitimacy of data can be called into question through historical case studies of the US Census

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $280,942
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Marti Hearst

    Whether you call it machine learning, deep learning, or AI, a new set of methods at the interface of statistics and computer science are being applied to research across the sciences. A consequence of the excitement about these new methods is that disciplinary researchers eager to use them in their research must both get up to speed quickly and maintain an awareness of a new literature, one which is moving at high volume and velocity. Increased interest in the AI literature, however, comes just as that literature is getting harder to read thanks to a combination of short publish-response cycles and rapidly evolving norms about what should be cited and explained in a given paper. This grant funds a project by computer scientist Marti Hearst to develop interfaces to the AI literature that offer additional context and support for readers not deeply acquainted with the field. Hearst’s lab will develop algorithms and software to help readers see the meanings of symbols and terms anywhere in the text of a given article, regardless of where they are defined, and pull in explanations from papers in the co-citation network of the paper being read where definitions are not present in the text itself. The resulting software, implemented in a lightweight interface that integrates with PDF readers to ensure wide adoption, will be of value to researchers across the sciences who are adopting machine learning methods.

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $390,634
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2019

    To improve access to and provenance of research data, software, and hardware from CubeSat missions

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Daina Bouquin

    To improve access to and provenance of research data, software, and hardware from CubeSat missions

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