Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Indiana University
    amount: $743,509
    city: Bloomington, IN
    year: 2018

    To examine radical concentrations and associated aerosol production in indoor environments

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Phillip Stevens

    Outdoors, strong ultraviolet light from the sun drives the photolysis of ozone, resulting in the production of hydroxyl (OH) radicals. Hydroxyl radicals, sometime referred to as “nature’s vacuum cleaner” are highly reactive and short lived. They can react with volatile organic compounds leading to the formation of peroxy radicals. These radicals, in turn, react rapidly with a range of compounds, eventually producing secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Yet much is unknown. Despite the absence of the strong ultraviolet light that drives oxidation reactions outdoors, there is preliminary evidence that indoor environments contain hydroxyl radicals. The pathways that generate these radicals and the role they play in indoor chemistry are mysteries. Funds from this grant support an effort by Philip S. Stevens (Indiana University), in collaboration with Brandon Boor (Purdue University), to examine radical concentrations and associated aerosol production in indoor environments. The team aims to improve our understanding of oxidation chemistry in indoor environments through comprehensive measurements of radical concentrations, including their sources and sinks, as well as the impact of radical concentrations on aerosol production in several laboratories, chambers, and at least one residence. The results of the studies will be shared through peer-reviewed journals and through presentations at meetings of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, the American Chemical Society, and the American Association for Aerosol Research. At least four students will be trained.

    To examine radical concentrations and associated aerosol production in indoor environments

    More
  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $299,998
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To examine hydrolysis reactions on damp surfaces and the impact on indoor air quality

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator V. Faye McNeill

    Hydrolysis is a reaction in which water is used to break down chemical bonds. Preliminary evidence suggests hydrolysis reactions could be very important indoors, breaking down common man-made ester (MME) compounds like those found in PVC pipes, and diffusing the resulting degradation products into the air. This grant funds a project by V. Faye McNeill, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Columbia University, to assess the impact of hydrolysis reactions of a range of man-made esters—occurring on damp indoor surfaces—on indoor air quality. Grant funds will allow McNeill to adapt her outdoor atmospheric chemistry model, GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), for application to the indoor environment. The adapted model, GAMMA-CIE, will introduce MME species, intermediates, and reaction products into the aqueous phase chemical mechanism, incorporate mass transfer between the aqueous and gas phases, and model oxidation in the gas phase. In addition to this modeling work, McNeill will perform laboratory measurements to provide missing data for the MME hydrolysis cascade under alkaline conditions and will examine the effect of acidic pH and ionic content of the aqueous film on MME hydrolysis kinetics. Among the MME compounds to be characterized are Texanol, a component of latex paints; TXIB (trimethyl pentanyl diisobutyrate); BBzP (benzyl butyl phthalate); and DEHA (diethylhydroxylamine). Last, McNeil will use the modified model to predict indoor air quality under typical domestic and commercial building scenarios. The model will simulate the fate of esters and the role of damp surfaces in realistic indoor conditions, providing new insights about indoor chemistry.

    To examine hydrolysis reactions on damp surfaces and the impact on indoor air quality

    More
  • grantee: Research Foundation of CUNY o/b/o Advanced Science Research Center
    amount: $30,746
    city: New York
    year: 2018

    To support a workshop on nanoscale chemistry of indoor environments

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Rein Ulijn

    To support a workshop on nanoscale chemistry of indoor environments

    More
  • grantee: College of William and Mary
    amount: $50,000
    city: Williamsburg, VA
    year: 2018

    To develop the indoor surface extractor/collector

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Rachel O'Brien

    To develop the indoor surface extractor/collector

    More
  • grantee: National Press Foundation
    amount: $5,540
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To demonstrate how HOMEChem activities can be translated for a lay audience via journalism

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Sandy Johnson

    To demonstrate how HOMEChem activities can be translated for a lay audience via journalism

    More
  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $74,996
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To support HOMEChem documentation as a basis for education and outreach activities

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz

    To support HOMEChem documentation as a basis for education and outreach activities

    More
  • grantee: University of York
    amount: $254,546
    city: York, United Kingdom
    year: 2018

    To develop an open source model for investigating indoor gas-phase chemistry and expand science communications about indoor chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Nicola Carslaw

    Modeling is essential to the development of indoor chemistry as a field. Comprehensive, integrated physical-chemical models that include a realistic representation of how buildings influence indoor processes are needed to assess gaps in our understanding, to improve experimental design, to generate hypotheses for investigation, to guide measurements, and to indicate key species to quantify and the detection limits required for quantification. The MOdelling Consortium for Chemistry of Indoor Environments (MOCCIE) consists of six teams of investigators with expertise and models in six different areas: kinetic process modeling, gas-phase chemistry modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, modeling of indoor secondary organic aerosols and organic aerosols, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and modeling surface interactions and the role of clothing and textiles. MOCCIE has determined that the best way to ensure reproducible indoor chemical science would be to strive to construct a fully integrated open source model. This requires converting each of the six existing MOCCIE models into an open source format. Funds from this grant would support a project to convert Nicola Carslaw’s gas phase chemistry model into a fully open source platform using the Python programming language. Additional funds support the construction of a new user-friendly interface to facilitate the model’s use and production of supporting documentation.   In addition to the modeling work, Carslaw will work to expand science communications about indoor chemistry by engaging a U.K.-based freelance science journalist, Nina Notman. Notman will attend indoor chemistry events and conferences, and give a plenary on science communication at the 2018 Indoor Air Conference.

    To develop an open source model for investigating indoor gas-phase chemistry and expand science communications about indoor chemistry

    More
  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $70,043
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To examine ozone reactions with four common indoor materials

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Richard Corsi

    To examine ozone reactions with four common indoor materials

    More
  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $24,269
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2018

    To support a workshop on indoor surface chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Andrew Ault

    To support a workshop on indoor surface chemistry

    More
  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $125,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2018

    To provide partial support for an instrument to improve detection of volatile organic compounds

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Joost de Gouw

    To provide partial support for an instrument to improve detection of volatile organic compounds

    More