Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Colorado State University Foundation
    amount: $54,044
    city: Fort Collins, CO
    year: 2016

    To support an indoor chemistry data needs workshop

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Delphine Farmer

    To support an indoor chemistry data needs workshop

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  • grantee: Missouri University of Science and Technology
    amount: $55,553
    city: Rolla, MO
    year: 2016

    To support an indoor chemistry modeling workshop

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Joel Burken

    To support an indoor chemistry modeling workshop

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $750,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2016

    To expand understanding of the processes controlling indoor chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Allen Goldstein

    This grant funds research by Professor William Nazaroff, an expert on the physics and chemistry of indoor air pollutants, and Professor Allen Goldstein, an expert on anthropogenic and natural contributions to the chemical composition of the atmosphere. The researchers are working to expand the understanding of processes controlling abundance, sources, and fates of organic chemicals indoors, focusing on the roles of human occupants as agents influencing indoor air chemistry. Over a several-week period, the researchers will monitor the indoor air of a residence under five conditions: (a) house vacant, emphasis on spatial resolution; (b) house vacant, emphasis on temporal resolution; (c) house normally occupied, emphasis on spatial resolution; (d) house normally occupied, emphasis on temporal resolution; and (e) manipulation experiments, such as cooking, cleaning, or dishwashing. Monitoring will focus on detecting several important chemicals, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrate radicals, nitrogen oxide trace gases, carbon dioxide, and ozone. In addition, the team will sample environmental conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, ultrafine particulate concentration, and air exchange rates. Samples will then be analyzed to try to apportion VOC chemical concentrations in sampled indoor air to their sources, including outdoor air, building-associated sources present when the residence is vacant, occupant-associated sources, and secondary production from indoor chemical reactions. This project will generate important new insights into indoor chemistry, which will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least three students will be trained during the course of the project.

    To expand understanding of the processes controlling indoor chemistry

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $750,000
    city: Toronto, ON, Canada
    year: 2016

    To expand understanding of multiphase chemistry in indoor environments

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Jonathan Abbatt

    This grant funds a three-year collaboration between Jonathan Abbatt, professor of chemistry, and Jeffrey Siegel, associate professor of civil and mineral engineering, to expand our understanding of multiphase chemistry in indoor environments. The overall goal of their grant-supported work is to better understand the nature of the reactive processes that affect the composition of material deposited on indoor surfaces and to examine the associated impacts on the state of the indoor environment. Abbatt and Siegel have chosen three common sources of materials that deposit on surfaces indoors: skin oil materials from people; particles generated by combustion processes such as cooking or cigarette smoking; and common chlorine- and nitrogen-containing cleaning agents such as household bleach. They will expose these chemicals to indoor air under both laboratory and real-world conditions and observe how such exposure leads to particulate deposits and the creation of new compounds. Abbatt and his team will use a comprehensive range of state-of-the-art mass spectrometer instrumentation to conduct the chemical analyses. Most of these instruments have been rarely, if ever, used indoors and the team expects to develop new analytical methods for their deployment indoors. The team will share their findings through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least one postdoctoral fellow and three students will be trained during the project.

    To expand understanding of multiphase chemistry in indoor environments

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  • grantee: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    amount: $200,000
    city: Chapel Hill, NC
    year: 2015

    To conduct preliminary research on the impact of moisture in indoor chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Barbara Turpin

    Recent advances in instrumentation have transformed our ability to study chemical reactions and analyze the composition of chemicals in the air. These advances provide an excellent opportunity to expand our understanding of the chemistry of indoor environments. This grant funds a preliminary study by Barbara J. Turpin, a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, of the impact of moisture on indoor chemistry. Turpin and her team plan to take samples from the air of 10 to 20 occupied homes, treat the samples with indoor oxidants (reactants) such as OH or NO3 radicals, and then monitor the reaction products using a variety of techniques. The study builds on Turpin’s prior work demonstrating that aqueous organic chemistry alters the composition and effects of air pollution outdoors. Turpin expects to produce at least two peer-reviewed articles based on the study, and she and her team will present their findings at national and international meetings. In addition, Turpin will prepare a short report that outlines important research questions and obstacles to be overcome for indoor air chemistry.

    To conduct preliminary research on the impact of moisture in indoor chemistry

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  • grantee: Missouri University of Science and Technology
    amount: $34,388
    city: Rolla, MO
    year: 2014

    To provide partial support for a workshop on indoor chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Glenn Morrison

    To provide partial support for a workshop on indoor chemistry

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $200,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2013

    To conduct preliminary research on the chemical emissions from human occupancy of indoor spaces

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator William Nazaroff

    This grant supports a joint project by environmental engineer William Nazaroff and atmospheric chemist Allen Goldstein at the University of California, Berkeley to study chemical emissions from human occupancy in indoor spaces. Nazaroff and Goldstein will develop suitable sampling and analysis protocols for simultaneous indoor and outdoor measurements of airborne gaseous and particulate species and measure indoor and outdoor air concentrations in university classrooms, both while vacant and while occupied.  Using these measurements, they will develop models to compute emission rates for a spectrum of organic and inorganic chemicals associated with human occupancy.  The team expects to produce at least two peer-reviewed articles and will present their findings at national and international meetings.  They will also prepare a short report that outlines important research questions and obstacles to be overcome in order to advance our understanding of indoor chemistry.  Grant funds also provide support for the training of one postdoctoral fellow.

    To conduct preliminary research on the chemical emissions from human occupancy of indoor spaces

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $200,000
    city: Toronto, ON, Canada
    year: 2013

    To conduct preliminary research on the chemistry occurring on indoor surfaces

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Jonathan Abbatt

    Funds from this grant support a project by Jonathan Abbatt, professor of chemistry at the University of Toronto, to conduct preliminary research on the chemistry occurring on indoor surfaces. Indoor surfaces are covered by films of semi-volatile chemical species that arise through the deposition of particulates, oils, and gas-phase oxidation products. This layer is known as the semi-volatile surface layer (SVSL). Abbatt’s research will address three fundamental issues associated with indoor SVSLs. First, what is the chemical composition of indoor SVSL’s, and how is it influenced by deposition time and location? Second, how reactive are indoor SVSL’s as a function of environmental conditions, such as relative humidity? Third, what analytical techniques are well suited for the chemical study of indoor SVSLs?Abbat will conduct studies on both model and genuine surfaces using a variety of analytical techniques including infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Direct Analysis in Real Time–Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS), a new technology that has not yet been applied to the study of indoor chemistry.

    To conduct preliminary research on the chemistry occurring on indoor surfaces

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $200,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2013

    To investigate the gas-particle-surface chemistry of organic chemicals in indoor environments

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Paul Ziemann

    Funds from this grant support the work of chemists Paul Ziemann and Jose-Luis Jimenez of the University of Colorado Boulder to improve our fundamental scientific understanding of the basic chemistry of aerosols in indoor environments. Using state-of-the-art instrumentation and methodology, Ziemann and Jimenez will measure the chemical composition of unperturbed and aged gases, aerosol particles, and surfaces in two to three homes and buildings; conduct laboratory studies of gases, aerosols, and surface films formed from reactions of organic chemicals commonly found in indoor air and on human occupants with O3 and NO3 radicals, water, and acids; and begin to develop theoretical models that explain these chemical reactions.Because environmental chemistry to date has focused virtually exclusively on the reactions taking place outdoors, the supported research fills a lacuna in our scientific understanding of the world.

    To investigate the gas-particle-surface chemistry of organic chemicals in indoor environments

    More