Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $19,460
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2016

    To compile, edit, and workshop the first Handbook in Behavioral Economics

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator David Laibson

    To compile, edit, and workshop the first Handbook in Behavioral Economics

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $996,922
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2016

    To conduct research and professional training on the theory and global practice of macroprudential regulation

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Financial and Institutional Modeling in Macroeconomics (FIMM)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Andrew Metrick

    This grant provides support to the Yale Program on Financial Stability (YPFS), a research and professional training program that exposes financial regulators to the best current theory and global practice in macroprudential regulation. Grant funds provide three years of support for the program’s summer school. Supported activities include a two-week Systemic Risk Symposium that brings regulators together with senior researchers to analyze past cases of regulatory intervention in such areas as asset crashes, liquidity crises, and the shadow banking sector; an academic conference on Fighting a Financial Crisis in which program participants serve as discussants of new, cutting-edge academic research; a Ph.D. dissertation workshop to expose students to regulatory datasets and career paths; and a Financial Crisis Forum that brings in highly regarded financial regulators like Ben Bernanke, Tim Geithner, Hank Paulson, and Stanley Fisher to discuss macroprudential regulation and the challenges and obstacles that stand in the way of effective regulatory intervention during financial crises.   Led by Professor Andrew Metrick, the Yale Program on Financial Stability is the only program of its kind. Its continued success holds the potential to build bridges between the academic and regulatory communities, spur further research, and equip the next generation of financial regulators with the tools they need to better fight future financial crises.

    To conduct research and professional training on the theory and global practice of macroprudential regulation

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $790,740
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2016

    To support the NBER Summer Institute

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Janet Currie

    The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Summer Institute is arguably the most important and influential annual event for empirical economists. This grant to NBER provides partial organizational and administrative funding for the Summer Institute for the next three years. The Summer Institute is a three-week academic festival. Over 2,400 economists participate in at least one of over 50 workshops. Directors of NBER’s 20 programs organize overlapping tracks that cover labor, aging, health, and other traditional subjects. In addition, special working groups meet at the Summer Institute to exchange ideas, discuss recent scholarly work, and identify promising new topics for study. Many prominent research results are first presented at the Institute, some in preliminary form that benefit from the intense discussion both during and after a workshop. There are also popular plenary sessions, such as the annual Feldstein Lecture and the Sloan-funded Methods Lecture. In addition to general support for the Institute, grant funds will be used to videotape sessions for wider distribution and for scholarships that underwrite the participation of emerging scholars from underrepresented groups.

    To support the NBER Summer Institute

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  • grantee: American Friends of the Hebrew University
    amount: $14,800
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2016

    To support broad participation by behavioral and experimental economists in the Economic Science Association’s annual conference

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Eyal Winter

    To support broad participation by behavioral and experimental economists in the Economic Science Association’s annual conference

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $124,994
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To strengthen a new postdoctoral program for interdisciplinary work on data science by including a position for a quantitative social scientist

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard McCullough

    To strengthen a new postdoctoral program for interdisciplinary work on data science by including a position for a quantitative social scientist

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $108,903
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2015

    To develop, test, document, and release methods for increasing data quality and decreasing disclosure risk in household datasets for public or restricted use

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Jerome Reiter

    To develop, test, document, and release methods for increasing data quality and decreasing disclosure risk in household datasets for public or restricted use

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  • grantee: Behavioral Science & Policy Association
    amount: $19,700
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2015

    To promote cooperation between behavioral researchers and policy practitioners

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Kate Wessels

    To promote cooperation between behavioral researchers and policy practitioners

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To launch an active and diverse study group on behavioral macroeconomics

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Michael Woodford

    To launch an active and diverse study group on behavioral macroeconomics

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  • grantee: University College London
    amount: $50,000
    city: London, United Kingdom
    year: 2015

    To launch a carefully curated and edited blog that will make insights from microeconomic research more widely and popularly accessible

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard Blundell

    To launch a carefully curated and edited blog that will make insights from microeconomic research more widely and popularly accessible

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $333,090
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2015

    To investigate how the availability and deployment of privacy enhancing technologies affect consumer behavior and welfare

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Alessandro Acquisti

    This grant funds efforts by Allessandro Acquisti at Carnegie Mellon University to examine, through laboratory, online, and field experiments, how Privacy Enhancing Technology (PET) can affect consumer behavior and welfare. Examples of PET tools include ad blockers like Ghostery, surveillance blockers like Tor, and cookie blockers like Beef Taco. Acquisti and his team will have PET software installed on the computers of some experimental subjects and then observe how their online behavior changes relative to a control group. They will then measure and analyze the subsequent differences in consumer behavior, like purchases or sites visited, as well as changes in the prices, products, or search results offered by websites and search engines to the two groups. The work promises to provide valuable new data on how concerns about privacy shape the way we conduct our lives online.

    To investigate how the availability and deployment of privacy enhancing technologies affect consumer behavior and welfare

    More