Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $466,337
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To study how information provision and disclosure policies can help or hinder the implementation of energy efficiency improvements

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Behavioral Economics and Household Finance (BEHF)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Karen Palmer

    The grants supports the work of a team led by Karen Palmer at Resources for the Future to try advance our understanding of the “energy efficiency paradox”, the puzzling phenomenon of consumers failing to adopt energy efficient technologies even when they will save both energy and money over the long run. Palmer and her team will focus on two specific research questions related to how information affects consumer behavior. First, do home energy audits fill an important information gap in homeowner’s awareness of energy efficiency costs and savings? Second, how do city ordinances that require the disclosure and benchmarking of energy use by owners of commercial and multifamily residential buildings affect rents, occupancy, and landlord investments in efficiency improvements?The project will produce two rich new datasets about home energy audits.  One is a survey of 1,600 households across 23 states.  Over 500 of these households will have had an energy audit recently.  The survey instrument explores topics that existing panels do not, such as salience, defaults, and other behavioral economics considerations; time and other nonmonetary transaction costs; and tests of recommendation recall by homeowners.  The second dataset will be administrative information from audit providers describing the services, recommendations, and follow-ups provided to each of their customers.  Grants funds will support data collection, analysis, and the dissemination of findings to the academic community and the public.

    To study how information provision and disclosure policies can help or hinder the implementation of energy efficiency improvements

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $682,228
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To strengthen the theoretical and empirical research base on high-skilled immigration

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator William Kerr

    This grant supports efforts by William Kerr of the Harvard Business School and Sara Turner of the University of Virginia to establish a research network focusing on advancing theoretical and empirical research on high-skilled immigration. Over the next three-and-a-half years, the new research center will convene leading experts from labor economics, international trade, industrial organization, education, and other fields; develop a compelling research agenda; and publish the results of their work. Supported activities include an ongoing series of workshops, conferences, and panels; honoraria and travel expenses for researchers; funds for data acquisition; and fellowship support for one post-doctoral and three pre-doctoral scholars.

    To strengthen the theoretical and empirical research base on high-skilled immigration

    More
  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $3,562,684
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To launch a research network that promotes the rigorous empirical study of economic issues in North America

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Amy Finkelstein

    The grant provides partial support to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to expand its influential Abdul Lateef Jameel-Poverty Action Laboratory (J-PAL), creating a sister network focused on the use of randomized controlled trials to study economic issues in North America. Led by economists Amy Finkelstein of MIT and Lawrence Katz of Harvard, the new network, J-PAL North America, will build a cadre of researchers devoted to the rigorous empirical study of questions important to the formation of public policy across a variety of issues, including crime, health, and poverty. Finkelstein, Katz and their team will build a shared administrative data platform to be used by network researchers; provide seed funding to help launch promising or innovative research projects; establish a central clearinghouse to match researchers with government or other institutional partners; and provide a centralized training program for the conduct of randomized controlled trials and policy evaluations. Other funded activities include the review and synthesis of existing evidence-based literature; the production of policy briefs for policymakers and other interested stakeholders; and the development of several “evidence workshops” to communicate with policymakers, potential donors, activists, and social entrepreneurs.

    To launch a research network that promotes the rigorous empirical study of economic issues in North America

    More
  • grantee: Chrinon Limited
    amount: $644,943
    city: London, United Kingdom
    year: 2013

    To link open data about corporate legal entities to company-related filings, licenses, and other government documents

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Chris Taggart

    Funds from this grant support an ambitious project by a team at Chrinon Limited to create an open access database that compiles information about legally recognized corporate entities, pulling information from dozens of public databases around the globe in the effort to identify the ownership, legal structure, and other features of every corporation, partnership, conglomerate, subsidiary, and holding company in the world. A small pilot grant from the Sloan Foundation launched the project in 2012 and the Chrinon team has made significant progress since then. The project website, OpenCorporates.com, already contains information on more than 65 million legal entities spanning more than 31 countries, all of which can be freely accessed academics, regulators, and the public. Grants funds will support the continued operation and expansion of OpenCorporates, including the collection of information about corporate court proceedings, regulatory filings, and licenses.

    To link open data about corporate legal entities to company-related filings, licenses, and other government documents

    More
  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $45,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To hold a workshop that informs and articulates a roadmap for research on privacy-preserving techniques for processing large sets of data

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Samuel Madden

    To hold a workshop that informs and articulates a roadmap for research on privacy-preserving techniques for processing large sets of data

    More
  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To explore new methods for funding scientific research

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Andrew Lo

    To explore new methods for funding scientific research

    More
  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $100,119
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2013

    To hold a conference on analyzing the costs and benefits of financial regulation

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Implications of the Great Recession (EIGR)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Eric Posner

    Funds from this grant support a conference organized by Glen Weyl and Eric Posner of the University of Chicago on “Benefit-Cost Analysis for Financial Regulation.” At the conference, economists, regulators, and lawyers will present and debate frameworks for evaluating government interventions in financial markets with the specific goal of catalyzing, collecting, and synthesizing the normative and quantitative research on the social welfare implications of rulemaking associated with the Dodd-Frank Act. Conference participants will represent a broad spectrum of practical and conceptual approaches to the issues at hand. Findings are scheduled to appear in a special issue of the Journal of Legal Studies. The hope is that such efforts can point the way toward more efficient, effective, and rational regimes for regulating the financial sector.

    To hold a conference on analyzing the costs and benefits of financial regulation

    More
  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $222,525
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2013

    To plan a professional training program on the theory and global practice of macroprudential regulation

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Implications of the Great Recession (EIGR)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Andrew Metrick

    This grant to Yale University supports the planning and development of a new “Program on Financial Stability” aimed at training a new generation of experts on financial regulation. Led by Yale Finance and Management professor Andrew Metrick, the program will aim to translate and synthesize research on macroprudential regulation that speaks to practitioners; compile case studies containing raw data and documentation that describe the interaction between regulation and firm behavior; train early-career scholar-regulators employed by major national and international agencies; and help build an international community of scholars, regulators, and financial experts. If successful, the program promises to provide an invaluable training resource that responds to the need to develop the human, social, and intellectual capital that financial regulators need to fend off future financial crises.

    To plan a professional training program on the theory and global practice of macroprudential regulation

    More
  • grantee: American Economic Association
    amount: $124,803
    city: Nashville, TN
    year: 2013

    To launch a study registry for randomized controlled trials in economics

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Esther Duflo

    The published research literature on any given topic likely represents a highly unrepresentative sample of all that is known. That is because authors and editors are rarely interested in publishing ambiguous or disconfirming results concerning a given hypothesis. Such “publication bias” creates vexing problems when performing formal meta-analyses, or whenever anyone tries to interpret the results of a body of empirical work.Suppose, however, that investigators could agree to collect and post public commitments to their research plans, including their hypotheses and methodologies, in advance of collecting all their data. Not only could simple transparency like this go a long way toward alleviating publication bias, it could also deter other ways researchers have of cherry picking and distorting results.This grant funds a project by the American Economic Association (AEA) to bring just such a thing about. Led by MIT economist Esther Duflo, the AEA will set up a national registry for randomized controlled trials in economics. By linking study designs to related datasets and by making study details more easily searchable, the proposed registry would advance the Foundation’s efforts to promote communication, transparency, and best practices among scholarly researchers.

    To launch a study registry for randomized controlled trials in economics

    More
  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $308,686
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To conduct ex-post evaluations of government regulations concerning health and environment in the United States

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard Morgenstern

    This grant supports a project led by Richard Morgenstern of the nonpartisan think tank Resources for the Future (RFF) to study the effects of specific regulations governing food safety, industrial water pollution, air toxics, and municipal water pollution. Morgenstern will also commission up to six additional regulatory assessments by outside academics whose research techniques meet high scientific criteria. The studies will focus not only on the evaluation of the specific regulations themselves, but on how new datasets and measurement capabilities can improve regulatory design and support more effective regulatory assessment. Results will be disseminated through a formal report and workshop targeted at relevant stakeholders in the government, academic, and NGO communities, and through a series of online outreach activities.

    To conduct ex-post evaluations of government regulations concerning health and environment in the United States

    More