Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Industrial Organizational Society, Inc.
    amount: $20,000
    city: East Lansing, MI
    year: 2012

    To support graduate student presentations at the International Industrial Organization Conference

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Joseph Harrington

    To support graduate student presentations at the International Industrial Organization Conference

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  • grantee: Chrinon Limited
    amount: $116,048
    city: London, United Kingdom
    year: 2012

    To demonstrate methods for identifying ownership and other relationships among corporate legal entities

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Chris Taggart

    To demonstrate methods for identifying ownership and other relationships among corporate legal entities

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $342,213
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2012

    To develop and promote data-sharing standards in the social sciences

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator George Alter

    Founded 50 years ago, the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for the social science research community. Over 700 institutions from all over the world belong to this consortium based at the University of Michigan, and its archives contain over 500,000 data files. This grant funds a project led by economic historian and ICPSR Director George Alter to help set standards and address challenges common to social science researchers who work with "big data." Grant funds will support three workshops that will aim to (1) develop consensus among social science journal editors about how to review, publish, and cite data; (2) develop common standards in a variety of scientific fields about how to archive data files and the "metadata" that describes them; and (3) develop a consensus among scientific grantmaking organizations about what data management standards should be imposed on grantees. Additional monies from this grant support a project to investigate the nondisclosure agreements (NDA) many social scientists sign in order to gain access to proprietary information and to explore the possibility of developing a common non-disclosure agreement on the model of the popular license developed by Creative Commons.

    To develop and promote data-sharing standards in the social sciences

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  • grantee: The Urban Institute
    amount: $270,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To improve the detail and utility of the Internal Revenue Service's public use files

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator James Nunns

    One of the few advantages of our complex tax code is that the information gathered can, in principle, provide researchers with accurate estimates of wages, investments, retirement savings, and many other economic variables. In practice, however, it is very hard for researchers to gain access to that information. Recognizing the demand for such data, the Internal Revenue Service has begun making more of its information available in aggregated tables and in de-identified compilations known as "Public Use Files." This two-year grant funds a project by the Tax Policy Center (TPC), a joint venture of the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution, to help make IRS data more useful to researchers, policymakers, and the public. Over the course of the next two years, researchers at the Tax Policy Center propose to add new information to existing IRS data offerings, including data about age, gender, and how joint earnings are split between couples. They will also develop new methodologies for estimating the characteristics of those who do not file taxes, allowing more robust conclusions to be drawn from IRS data. New data and methodologies will be developed and added in ways that protect taxpayer anonymity and privacy.

    To improve the detail and utility of the Internal Revenue Service's public use files

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  • grantee: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
    amount: $399,448
    city: Piscataway, NJ
    year: 2012

    To study pathways and patterns of course-taking and career development in science and technology

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Harold Salzman

    Casual discussions of the scientific and technical workforce often rely on a pipeline metaphor. In this picture, there is an ample supply of student interest to begin with, but leakage at critical junctures leaves only a trickle of graduates who actually pursue careers in STEM. The obvious remedy is to plug the leaks. But perhaps the "pipeline" theory is an easy but misleading oversimplification. This grant supports a project by Hal Salzman of Rutgers to investigate how various pathways can lead through the educational system to STEM careers. Using the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B) compiled by the National Center for Education Statistics, Salzman and his team will analyze the complex ways that course-taking patterns relate to decisions about STEM majors and careers, including how students (a) use college as a period of exploration; (b) may benefit from majoring in STEM without pursuing a traditional STEM career; (c) can major in a non-STEM field but still do lots of science in classes or at work; (d) make choices that are influenced by both supply and demand variables; and (e) can thereby end up in scientific careers by way of nonlinear and nontraditional routes. The resulting picture, complemented by a series of interviews with students and site views to universities, promises to help build a more robust, nuanced of the myriad ways in which students may end up in scientific careers.

    To study pathways and patterns of course-taking and career development in science and technology

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  • grantee: International Association for Research in Income and Wealth
    amount: $140,000
    city: Ottawa, Canada
    year: 2012

    To study and share improvements for estimating gross domestic product

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Andrew Sharpe

    Gross domestic product (GDP) is the most important statistic in macroeconomics. As a measure of the value of goods and services produced within a country, GDP announcements can swing stock markets, political sentiments, business plans, and much else. Yet despite its importance, GDP figures--calculated in the U.S. by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) --are merely estimates and often subject to substantial subsequent revision. With businesses, politicians, and consumers making choices based on GDP data, however, such revisions can be costly. With so much at stake, the methodology for estimating GDP and similar statistics is the subject of constant scrutiny. This grant supports a major international conference about macroeconomic statistics to be held in August 2012. Conference participants will include a host of venerable research and government institutions, including the BEA, the International Monetary Fund, the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. Grant funds will offset conference costs, support the commissioning of papers for conference sessions on GDP revisions and new GDP data sources, and enable the publication of a selection of peer-reviewed papers from the conference.

    To study and share improvements for estimating gross domestic product

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $16,080
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2012

    Conference on the history of the MIT Economics Department and its transformative role in post WWII Economics

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator E. Weintraub

    Conference on the history of the MIT Economics Department and its transformative role in post WWII Economics

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  • grantee: George Washington University
    amount: $15,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To provide partial support for a conference to increase awareness about potential uses of new economic data sources available from federal, commercial, university, and non-profit data providers

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Andrew Reamer

    To provide partial support for a conference to increase awareness about potential uses of new economic data sources available from federal, commercial, university, and non-profit data providers

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $293,250
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2012

    To create and deploy a Laboratory for Online Research in Economics

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Erez Lieberman Aiden

    Many seminal experiments in behavioral economics have been performed using small groups of undergraduates at elite universities as subjects. Drawing robust scientific conclusions from these experiments is difficult. Student test subjects are, in general, whiter, richer, younger, and more American than the world populace taken as a whole. In addition, the campus laboratories that conduct such experiments are expensive to run, limiting the number of students that can be tested. Given the new possibilities opened up by the advent of the Internet, there should be easier ways to gather behavioral data using large numbers of participants from all over the world. This grant supports a project by Harvard's Erez Liberman Aiden to develop a user-friendly platform for creating, performing, and tracking large-scale economic experiments online. Called the "Laboratory for Online Research in Economics" (LORE), the platform will invite online visitors to participate in economic experiments, beginning in with classic "matrix games" such as the Prisoners' Dilemma or the Public Goods game and eventually expanding to include auction and market simulations with complex matching protocols and population structures. Harvard has funded the creation of a preliminary version of the LORE platform. Funds from this grant would pay for hardware, the hiring of a programmer, and provision of player incentives.

    To create and deploy a Laboratory for Online Research in Economics

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $386,574
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2012

    To study internet markets using detailed data about consumer and firm behavior from eBay

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Jonathan Levin

    Funds from this grant support the work of Stanford economists Jonathan Levin and Liran Einay, who have obtained unprecedented access to a massive dataset on consumer behavior data collected by the internet retailing giant and auction site eBay. The eBay data is a goldmine of information containing records of hundreds of millions of transactions over ten years, including the histories of every seller, details on every item ever listed on the site, and records of every click made by site users. Grant monies will support Levin and Einay's work analyzing this data, which will initially focus on three distinct issues: how buyer and seller behavior have changed over time particularly with regard to auctions; how to model seller learning; and the impact of changes in online sales taxes on buyer and seller behavior. The depth and richness of the dataset they will be analyzing promises to shed new light on our understanding of what happens when people go shopping.

    To study internet markets using detailed data about consumer and firm behavior from eBay

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