Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $495,650
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2011

    To enable international economic comparisons by supporting the Penn World Table's next generation

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Feenstra

    The Penn World Table (PWT), a set of national accounts data which measures real GDP and relative price levels across countries and over time, is one of the most frequently cited datasets in economics. A 2009 found that, of all the cross-country empirical publications in the economic growth and development literature, nearly two thirds are based on the PWT. Version 6.1 of the PWT has more than 3,000 citations. Until now, the PWT has been a product of the Center for International Comparisons at the University of Pennsylvania, and was produced through the pioneering work of Simon Kuznets, Irving Kravis, Alan Heston, Robert Summers, and Bettina Aten. Yet this team has now either retired or moved on to other pursuits. At this point, Heston, at 77 years old, is the only one still active in preparing the PWT, and shortages of staff and funding have slowed revisions and methodological improvements to the tables. The PWT needs a new home. This grant will partially fund the transition of the Penn World Table from the University of Pennsylvania to the University of California, Davis and the University of Groningen under the care of Robert Feenstra and Marcel Timmer, respectively. Additional funds are provided to evaluate and, if appropriate, implement proposed methodological improvements to the PWT.

    To enable international economic comparisons by supporting the Penn World Table's next generation

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  • grantee: University of Oxford
    amount: $845,747
    city: Oxford, United Kingdom
    year: 2011

    To promote and advance international comparative studies of household finance

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Tarun Ramadorai

    Researchers who study household finance study how households make investment decisions, with a particular eye on the common, costly mistakes households make when making important investment choices, such as purchasing a home or allocating savings for retirement. As such, conclusions reached by researchers in this field are highly relevant to policy and regulatory issues of consumer protection, financial literacy, and financial product design. Unfortunately, however, household finance research has tended to focus on households in a small number of developed countries such as the U.S., Sweden, and Finland, that have good, easily accessible data on household investment behavior. Though understandable-good research requires good data-the small number of such countries limits the usefulness of the research conducted, since it is unclear how lessons learned from the household financial behavior of Swedes might be applied to Brazil or India where market conditions, social norms, and national institutions differ substantially. This grant supports the work of Tarun Ramadorai of Oxford University and John Y. Campbell of Harvard University who are working to broaden and enrich the field of household finance by bringing new international comparative perspectives to the field. Over the next three years, Ramadorai and Campbell will create a new international dataset on household financial behavior sourced from both developed and developing economies. Grant funds will support the creation of this dataset, its analysis, a fellowship to encourage participation by foreign economists in the project, and several conferences and academic workshops focused on topics relevant to the field.

    To promote and advance international comparative studies of household finance

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $976,171
    city: Toronto, ON, Canada
    year: 2011

    To study the economics of knowledge contribution and distribution

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Joshua Gans

    What motivates people to share what they know for the common good? Why do people edit pages in Wikipedia, contribute to the Zagat Guide, or participate in open-source software development when there is little or no (apparent) incentive to do so? Not only do traditional economic theories and models have little to say about the "economics of knowledge contribution," the issues are not even easy to talk about within existing theoretical frameworks. This grant will fund the work of economists Joshua Gans of the University of Toronto and Fiona Murray of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as they seek to understand and explain the economics of why some uncompensated creative activities thrive for the benefit of society while others do not.

    To study the economics of knowledge contribution and distribution

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $118,851
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2011

    To construct and test behavioral models of how bankruptcy and mortgage default regulations impact household financial decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Costas Meghir

    To construct and test behavioral models of how bankruptcy and mortgage default regulations impact household financial decisions

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  • grantee: University of Wisconsin, Madison
    amount: $45,000
    city: Madison, WI
    year: 2011

    To model and empirically test for unintended behavioral consequences of Medicare Part D regulations

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Francesco Decarolis

    To model and empirically test for unintended behavioral consequences of Medicare Part D regulations

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  • grantee: Center for the Study of the Presidency
    amount: $67,600
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To design and run an exercise involving high-level public and private sector participants that simulates a hypothetical financial crisis

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Matthew Purushotham

    To design and run an exercise involving high-level public and private sector participants that simulates a hypothetical financial crisis

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  • grantee: Syracuse University
    amount: $124,775
    city: Syracuse, NY
    year: 2011

    To analyze the nature and estimated number of jobs associated with the wind energy industry in the U.S. and elsewhere

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Jason Dedrick

    To analyze the nature and estimated number of jobs associated with the wind energy industry in the U.S. and elsewhere

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  • grantee: American University
    amount: $207,665
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To create a research database by sampling and digitally preserving personal bankruptcy records going back over a century

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Mary Hansen

    Federal court records document over 30 million personal bankruptcy cases during the century since the U.S. passed its first permanent bankruptcy law in 1898. Storing and maintaining these records is expensive, however-the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts has been spending $2 million per year to keep about a million cubic feet of these paper records stored in boxes at Federal Records Centers in a dozen different regions-and efforts were recently announced to cut costs, possibly by disposing of all these records. Plans to discard this rich historical record naturally set off alarms among scholars of all sorts, from those studying gender and racial disparities, to those interested in business cycles. Researchers began to write about compelling projects that could only be completed using these bankruptcy records. Funds from this grant will support efforts by American University Professor Mary Hansen to work with the National Archive and Records Administration to create a research database from a statistically representative sample of these bankruptcy records, digitally preserving the data they contain for future use by scholars.

    To create a research database by sampling and digitally preserving personal bankruptcy records going back over a century

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $435,689
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2011

    To conduct and promote research on the credit rating industry and its regulation

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Chester Spatt

    In July 2010, Carnegie Mellon professor Chester Spatt hosted a Foundation-supported conference on the industrial organization of credit ratings agencies - the industry responsible for evaluating the creditworthiness of financial instruments and products. The 80 conference participants composed a diverse crop of researchers, including economists, industry practitioners, government officials, and international experts. In addition to presentations on a number of important topics, including litigation risk, competition among rating firms, and regulatory challenges associated with securitization, the conference hosted a session on next steps, where attendees voiced enthusiasm for forming a research network, continuing annual conferences, compiling shared data, and increasing interaction with policymakers. Funds from this grant will support a project by Professor Spatt to develop just such an ongoing research network. Additional funds provide continued support for Professor Spatt's own work on developing sophisticated game theoretic models of the credit rating process, with an emphasis on potential biases introduced into the ratings process by the way firms purchase ratings sequentially and then decide which ratings to publish.

    To conduct and promote research on the credit rating industry and its regulation

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  • grantee: Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
    amount: $349,622
    city: Kalamazoo, MI
    year: 2011

    To study ways of improving economic measurements, statistics, and indicators related to globalization

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Susan Houseman

    This grant to Susan Houseman of the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research supports ongoing efforts to study ways to improve the quality of federal statistics related to the effects of globalization and international trade flows on the U.S. economy and work with officials at the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of economic analysis to develop practical strategies to correct biases or methodological flaws in current data collection practices. Funds from this grant will support the commissioning of several papers on federal data collection methodologies; an academic conference to be attended by economists, researchers, policymakers, and federal officials; a published volume of papers; and the development of concrete plans for improving how we understand and measure the effects of globalization on the U.S. economy.

    To study ways of improving economic measurements, statistics, and indicators related to globalization

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