Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $250,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2022

    To support a special semester focused on advances in causal inference methods

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Shafi Goldwasser

    To support a special semester focused on advances in causal inference methods

    More
  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $214,901
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2021

    To identify and test effective interventions for enhancing the quality and completeness of randomized-controlled-trial registries

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Lars Vilhuber

    To identify and test effective interventions for enhancing the quality and completeness of randomized-controlled-trial registries

    More
  • grantee: Social Science Research Council
    amount: $250,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2021

    To support and shape research in behavioral economics by Project Mercury, a consortium concerned with applications to public health challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Anna Harvey

    To support and shape research in behavioral economics by Project Mercury, a consortium concerned with applications to public health challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $22,435
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2021

    To support an interdisciplinary conference on the impacts of technological advances on the economy and society

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Martin Sanchez-Jankowski

    To support an interdisciplinary conference on the impacts of technological advances on the economy and society

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $248,660
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2021

    To accelerate the formulation, study, and adoption of macroeconomic models that take behavioral biases into account

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Chen Lian

    To accelerate the formulation, study, and adoption of macroeconomic models that take behavioral biases into account

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $750,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2021

    To develop a sustainable open source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Salil Vadhan

    The mathematical theory of differential privacy describes methods and practices that allow researchers to query sensitive datasets while controlling how much each query compromises the privacy of individuals contained in the dataset. This approach represents the cutting edge of privacy-protection, but one that is mathematically subtle and challenging to implement. Widespread use of these methods will require lowering the cost of adoption and adaptation.  OpenDP  is therefore producing a tested, trustworthy, interoperable, and flexible library of software that will make it easier for users to set up differentially private access to sensitive data. This grant provides continuing support for Harvard computer scientist Salil Vadhan, creator of OpenDP, as well as a dedicated community of theorists, engineers, practitioners, and privacy experts that is aiming to increase adoption of differential privacy. Now in its third year, OpenDP is shifting from a minimum viable product to a prospering ecosystem with heightened impact and broadened support. Specifically, grant funds allow Vadhan to expand OpenDP’s library capabilities to meet new application needs; promote OpenDP adoption among social science researchers; and further strengthen the growing community of experts using and contributing to OpenDP.  Eventually, OpenDP will serve as a sustainable open-source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis.

    To develop a sustainable open source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis

    More
  • grantee: FPF Education and Innovation Foundation
    amount: $385,292
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2021

    To accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sara Jordan

    The value of letting independent social scientists study the administrative data collected by companies of all sorts is hardly in doubt. Economists are particularly keen on basing hypotheses, models, and economic indicators on such information. Companies are often reluctant to share their data, however, in part due to concerns regarding data privacy, costs, inconvenience, reputational risk, or ethical issues. Recent regulatory measures, which give users control over their data, complicate matters even further. Without better data sharing mechanisms, we may soon live in a world where only a few large companies have access to that data and the insights such information provides. This grant supports Sara Jordan at the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) Education and Innovation Foundation, a strictly nonpartisan and nonprofit organization, who is developing a strategy to further accelerate corporate-academic data sharing. Grant funds provide continued support for the Foundation’s Award for Research Data Stewardship, allow Jordan to prepare compelling use cases to demonstrate how insights generated by administrative data can advance research and evidence-based policymaking, and also allow the creation of a legislative tracker producing real-time analysis to be shared with the research community. Combined, Jordan’s efforts accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers.

    To accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers

    More
  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $357,127
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2021

    To develop an analytical framework that incorporates distributional concerns in policy evaluation

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Matthew Backus

    “Consumer surplus” is defined as the total monetary gain to consumers when they can buy an item at a price lower than the maximum price they'd willingly pay for it. If a book costs $20 and three people would be willing to pay $40 for it, the consumer surplus of that book’s price is 3 x ($40-$20), or $60. This metric is frequently used by economists to measure the effectiveness of different policies, particularly those involving antitrust cases. Traditional calculations of social welfare that use consumer surplus, however, ignore the fact that the value of an extra dollar, known as the “marginal utility” of income, can have very different value for different people. Because adding another dollar to their paycheck means less to the affluent than it does to those who are less well off, the latter receive systematically less weight in consumer surplus calculations. This grant supports Matthew Backus at Columbia Business School, who will call attention to those weights by calculating what they actually are for different subpopulations. His goal is to develop an alternative framework to consumer-surplus analysis that makes distributional considerations more explicit. Backus’s new framework will weave distributional concerns into policy analysis, bring transparency to the ways consumer surplus measures weigh the welfare of different demographic groups, and use those weights in policy evaluation to account for distributional issues. One particularly interesting application Backus will explore is examining how public welfare measurements vary when completely different weights are assigned to various demographic groups, starting with equal weights for all.

    To develop an analytical framework that incorporates distributional concerns in policy evaluation

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $428,310
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2021

    To expand the pool of researchers studying the economics of racial and ethnic disparities

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Juan Carlos Suбrez Serrato

    This grant supports Juan Carlos Suбrez Serrato, a professor of economics at Duke University and faculty associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), who is seeking to improve our understanding of DEI issues in economics by expanding the pool of researchers studying the economics of racial and ethnic disparities. Grant funds will provide one-year fellowships to three postdoctoral researchers whose work addresses labor market disparities, the institutions that reduce or reinforce them, and the ways in which economic choices can affect such outcomes. To reach perspectives beyond those of predominant groups in the profession, the plan is for Suбrez Serrato and the rest of a highly distinguished, diverse, and experienced selection committee to recruit assiduously for postdoctoral candidates from underrepresented groups. Fellows will spend a year working at NBER’s Cambridge headquarters, where they will each both work with a mentor and also network with the Bureau’s wider scholarly community.

    To expand the pool of researchers studying the economics of racial and ethnic disparities

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $398,970
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2021

    To study the value of administrative data access for economics research and policy

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Abhishek Nagaraj

    “Administrative data” refers to information gathered for purposes other than research. Examples include educational, legal, hospital, commercial, and other transaction records compiled either by the public or private institutions. Such data could be extremely valuable in economics research but the process of compiling it can be complicated, expensive, and frustrating—with data quality, privacy, and documentation issues representing only some of the common problems facing researchers. As a result, we still have a limited understanding of how valuable administrative data is for economics research. This grant supports Abishek Nagaraj, head of the Data Innovation Lab at the UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, who seeks to derive fundamental economic estimates of the value of administrative data. Nagaraj will analyze the role administrative data plays in determining the quality, rate, and direction of science, with a particular focus on economics research and policy. Though his initial focus is on evaluating the value of public sector data—with a focus on the Federal Statistical Research Data Centers—Nagaraj foresees a second phase of his work that would study the value to researchers of administrative data compiled by the private sector. The project will explore topics such as: which types of research benefit from administrative data access; how data access impacts faculty and students differently; the heterogeneous impact of data access across researchers’ demographics and the status of their institutions; the impact of data access on the diversity of research topics studied and demographics in academia; how data access shapes the balance between theoretical and empirical approaches in economics; and the mechanisms through which data access translates into career outcomes.

    To study the value of administrative data access for economics research and policy

    More
We use cookies to analyze our traffic. Please decide if you are willing to accept cookies from our website.