Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $34,951
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To study how risk databases and choice engines can improve consumers' financial decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Daniel Carpenter

    To study how risk databases and choice engines can improve consumers' financial decisions

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $122,263
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2010

    To study how and why consumers give up on making complex financial decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator John Lynch

    To study how and why consumers give up on making complex financial decisions

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $19,575
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To study career choice in terms of the benefits to society and tax costs to individuals

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Elaine Bernard

    To study career choice in terms of the benefits to society and tax costs to individuals

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $20,000
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2010

    To hold a workshop on "Frameworks for Systemic Risk Monitoring"

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Clifford Rossi

    To hold a workshop on "Frameworks for Systemic Risk Monitoring"

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $274,965
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To foster multilateral cooperation in trade, financial regulation, and macroeconomic policy by organizing a forum for leading academics and officials

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Feenstra

    Crises have a way of bringing out "every man for himself" instincts just when cooperation and coordination are most needed. This kind of thinking in 1930 resulted in America's Smoot-Hawley tariff. Its passage provoked the imposition of retaliatory tariffs by many other countries, reduced U.S. exports and imports by 50 percent, and, by most accounts, directly helped bring on the Great Depression. There is considerable reason, therefore, to avoid making similar mistakes in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis. Robert Feenstra and Alan Taylor are organizing a Global Forum for the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) on the topic "Globalization in an Age of Crisis: Multilateral Economic Cooperation in the Twenty-First Century." The event, to be hosted by the Bank of England, is specifically designed to facilitate interaction among leading academics and policymakers from around the world, including existing Sloan Foundation grantees working on theoretical, historical, or institutional aspects of international economics. Participants will be expected not only to critique the research, data, and analyses presented, but also to formulate plans and initiatives for fostering multilateral economic cooperation in the wake of financial turmoil.

    To foster multilateral cooperation in trade, financial regulation, and macroeconomic policy by organizing a forum for leading academics and officials

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  • grantee: Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics
    amount: $245,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2010

    To analyze empirical lessons that countries can learn from the financial crisis about how to restructure their financial sectors

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Adam Posen

    Policies instituted during the 2008 financial crisis may have averted total disaster, but many of these can also make matters worse if left in place. For example, the forced merging of banks now makes the "too big to fail" problem all the more vexing. The structural, regulatory, and institutional reforms needed to address such problems globally will be the subject of a book project led by Adam Posen, a Senior Fellow at the Peter G. Peterson Institute of International Economics. Those who have begun trying to imagine new structures for the banking and financial sector are, according to Posen, often hobbled by unproven myths about regulation, industrial organization, disclosure requirements, and the incentive systems for banks and bankers. Adam Posen is working on how to indentify, justify, and coordinate the implementation of new financial structures going forward, and funds from this grant provide necessary support for this ongoing work.

    To analyze empirical lessons that countries can learn from the financial crisis about how to restructure their financial sectors

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $293,299
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To study behavioral factors that influence consumers' energy utilization and efficiency choices

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sendhil Mullainathan

    Engineers have been writing for years about how simple steps like home weatherization can save consumers considerable money. Relatively few consumers, however, take such simple, cost-saving steps. Among economists, this puzzling phenomenon is sometimes called the "Energy Efficiency Paradox." This grant will support the work of Harvard economist Sendhil Mullainathan and the "ideas42" research group he leads, as they pursue six related research projects, all grounded in empirical observation, studying how people make energy consumption and utilization decisions and what policy-relevant conclusions might be drawn from what is learned. The results may be surprising. In previous work with the company OPOWER, for example, Mullainathan's group found that giving consumers information about their neighbors' energy use had significantly greater impact than just providing information about their own energy consumption. Utility companies and federal agencies are presently spending huge amounts of money on energy efficiency and metering programs based on very little in the way of theory, evidence, or experiment. Together with a project manager and several research assistants funded through this grant, the team of outstanding economists, energy experts, psychologists, and marketers that make up "ideas42" are poised to make important contributions to our understanding of the "Energy Efficiency Paradox" and other apparent behavioral anomalies that can be observed when consumers make energy-related decisions.

    To study behavioral factors that influence consumers' energy utilization and efficiency choices

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $250,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To examine the effects of globalization on U.S. domestic regulatory policies, compliance, and economics in biopharmaceutical product manufacturing

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Anthony Sinskey

    The use of biopharmaceutical products has increased greatly over the past twenty years and is expected to continue to increase in volume and importance in years to come. Like many other manufacturing operations, there has been a substantial increase in the globalization of biopharmaceutical production within the last five to ten years. The FDA, the Government Accountability Office, and Congress are well aware of the challenges and tradeoffs involved when industries globalize, and in response the FDA has adjusted its inspection policies and practices. Funds from this grant will support a multidisciplinary team of researchers based at MIT's Center for Biomedical Innovation and led by Georgetown University Professor Jeffrey Macher, in their work to study how globalization has changed regulatory practice surrounding the production and distribution of biopharmaceuticals.

    To examine the effects of globalization on U.S. domestic regulatory policies, compliance, and economics in biopharmaceutical product manufacturing

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  • grantee: Clean Air Task Force
    amount: $10,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2010

    To plan a full scale study of US energy efficiency potential on the building and industrial sector

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Steven Brick

    To plan a full scale study of US energy efficiency potential on the building and industrial sector

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $605,347
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    For an annual and independent forum that will identify, analyze, discuss, and promote options for international monetary reform

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Eswar Prasad

    Multinational financial organizations like the International Monetary Fund (IMF) can sometimes become insular, politicized, ponderous, and unaccountable. That is why Raghuram Rajan from the University of Chicago and Barry Eichengreen from the University of California, Berkeley, plan on establishing an independent "Council on International Monetary Reform" (CIMR) to monitor, advise, consult with, and critique the IMF. These two professors are among the world's most respected and engaged authorities on international financial and monetary economics. The CIMR will consist of fewer than 18 members representing a balanced variety of countries, ideologies, and economic approaches. The grant budget provides for a CIMR planning conference followed by three annual meetings. The Council will interact with senior IMF officials, with attendees at the main IMF meetings each fall, and with the media as well. Establishing this CIMR is just one component of the Sloan Foundation's developing initiative on international financial regulation. The goal of this entire initiative is to inform, prepare, and eventually institute significant reforms of the international financial and monetary system.

    For an annual and independent forum that will identify, analyze, discuss, and promote options for international monetary reform

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