Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Wellesley College
    amount: $308,075
    city: Wellesley, MA
    year: 2011

    To examine how firms shape the immigration of scientists, engineers, and other highly skilled workers to the United States

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sari Kerr

    When scientists and engineers immigrate to the United States, is it an important and enabling enhancement for our high-tech economy, or does it discourage and displace natives who would otherwise fill the jobs that these foreigners take? There is no shortage of entrenched views and vehement arguments on all sides of such questions. Though very little reputable research had been done on this subject not so many years ago, now immigration policy for highly skilled workers has become a controversial and polarizing topic among both politicians and academics. What is needed are dispassionate empirical studies of how the immigration of highly skilled workers can affect wages, employment, innovation, and productivity. This grant will support the work of Sari and William Kerr, rare examples of immigration researchers who are themselves highly skilled, but who are not readily associated with any political, methodological, or ideological camps. Rather, they have a reputation for working with interesting data, then letting the results fall where they may and speak for themselves. Their research under this grant will make pioneering use of sophisticated datasets that have only recently become available, including the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) files now maintained by the U.S. Census Bureau. Their work will be the first study of highly skilled immigration based on data and analysis at the firm level. The project will also address the question of whether firms are substituting younger highly skilled immigrants for older highly skilled native workers.

    To examine how firms shape the immigration of scientists, engineers, and other highly skilled workers to the United States

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  • grantee: Institute for New Economic Thinking
    amount: $15,108
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To support the participation of students in a major international conference on new economic thinking

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Johnson

    To support the participation of students in a major international conference on new economic thinking

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $89,570
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To advance understanding of market-based approaches to environmental protection by examining the legacy of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 by means of a two day workshop and report

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Stavins

    To advance understanding of market-based approaches to environmental protection by examining the legacy of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 by means of a two day workshop and report

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $767,280
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To support Summer Institutes run by the National Bureau of Economic Research

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Amy Finkelstein

    Funds from this grant provide support to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) to holds its annual Summer Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The NBER Summer Institute has become the most important meeting of its kind in the world, attracting, in recent years, nearly 2,000 participants over the course of four weeks to present and discuss the latest empirical research in all fields of economics. This makes the Summer Institute one of the best platforms to highlight and publicize Sloan Foundation research activities in economics and finance. More than 40 different Institute workshops are scheduled to overlap in ways that facilitate interactions among related fields and researchers and special efforts are being instituted to include a younger and more diverse crowd in addition to established scholars. The 400 or so papers presented are available online both to participants and to other researchers. Recent Institute programs specifically developed with Sloan support have focused on the financial crisis generally and on credit rating agencies in particular. Core support provided by this grant will not only fund participation in workshops, it will also help carry forward innovations such as the prestigious Feldstein Lectures, methodological courses, and a new workshop on the "Conduct of Research."

    To support Summer Institutes run by the National Bureau of Economic Research

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $999,155
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To initiate and organize research on the economics of digital information

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Shane Greenstein

    The digitization of information on a massive scale challenges many traditional assumptions about how media markets, intellectual property laws, innovation, governance, and other important aspects of our world can or should work. Adjustments taking place due to advances in digital information technology are rapid, significant, unfinished, and little studied by objective academics as opposed to interested stakeholders. This grant to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), supports efforts to establish an impartial community of scholars dedicated to studying the determinants and consequences of digitization. Activities funded through this grant divide into three broad categories: the development an economic framework for analyzing the effects of changes in and diffusion of digital information technology that is theoretically grounded and empirically relevant; the application of such a framework to the systematic evaluation of policy and governance issues; and the improvement of measures of the extent, impact, and potential for the diffusion and use of digital information technology through providing datasets that researchers can share. Funds from this grant will support annual workshops at the NBER Summer Institute, winter outreach meetings with practitioners and a culminating conference and proceedings. Funds for small research grants, postdoctoral fellowships, and data infrastructure are also included. Taken together, the funded activities represent a comprehensive and unique opportunity for improving how we understand the problems and promise of digitization.

    To initiate and organize research on the economics of digital information

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  • grantee: Dartmouth College
    amount: $119,591
    city: Hanover, NH
    year: 2010

    To create and study network models of systemic risk in banking and finance

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Daniel Rockmore

    To create and study network models of systemic risk in banking and finance

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $115,690
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To convene conferences on the measurement of systemic risk and liquidity

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Arvind Krishnamurthy

    To convene conferences on the measurement of systemic risk and liquidity

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $244,343
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2010

    To study energy efficiency gains and participation rates associated with the Federal Weatherization Assistance Program through randomized-control trials using data from Michigan

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Catherine Wolfram

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the federal budget for its Weatherization Assistance Program jumped from $250 million per year to $5 billion. But how much energy will retrofitted weatherization really save among households eligible for such support? Researchers Catherine Wolfram and Meredith Fowlie want to know. They have designed large-scale randomized-control field trials to study if and when consumers take advantage of the newly available federal funds to support weatherization. The U.S. Department of Energy is interested in supporting research on its Weatherization Assistance Program, but cannot provide funding in a timely manner. Sloan funding will allow the project to move ahead now rather than waiting another year or more for the U.S. Department of Energy to provide support.

    To study energy efficiency gains and participation rates associated with the Federal Weatherization Assistance Program through randomized-control trials using data from Michigan

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  • grantee: New Venture Fund
    amount: $117,640
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2010

    To study experimentally the market for retail financial advice

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Antoinette Schoar

    The decisions individual households make about consumer financial products can be complicated, and so many people rely on expert advice. But is such advice any good? How well can consumers tell if it is or it isn't? Antoinette Schoar, a finance professor at MIT, and her collaborators have already conducted a pilot "audit study" to address the first question by dispatching trained actors to visit selected advisors. In addition to expanding this research on the supply side of the market for retail consumer financial advice, Schoar's team also plans new laboratory experiments to investigate the demand side of that market by measuring how consumers react to videotapes of different financial advisors. This project has already secured some highly competitive funding from the National Science Foundation, but more is needed to cover the experimental costs of sample sizes large enough to be statistically convincing. Sloan support will provide the necessary funds.

    To study experimentally the market for retail financial advice

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $63,249
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2010

    To investigate how consumers process complex financial data and decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator John Payne

    To investigate how consumers process complex financial data and decisions

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