Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $349,324
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To stimulate new academic research on global aspects of the financial crisis and "Great Recession"

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Kristin Forbes

    Surprisingly few ideas from the field of international economics have turned out to be useful either in the run-up to the recent financial upheaval or in its aftermath. To reinvigorate the field of international macroeconomics, Kristin Forbes of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Jeff Frankel of Harvard University are organizing a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) project on "The Global Financial Crisis." Pairing the two of them illustrates how their project, like everything NBER does, will be strictly non-partisan and aimed at developing fundamental understanding rather than explicit policy recommendation. For example, three basic research questions this project will concentrate on are: How did global imbalances contribute to the crisis? How was the crisis transmitted internationally? How has the global nature of the crisis affected macroeconomic policy ranging from fiscal and monetary policy to bank regulation and the role of the dollar? The plan is to issue a broad call for proposals to prepare and present papers on these topics, commission a dozen of the best submitted in the competitive solicitation, post them as working papers, and hold a pre-conference with assigned discussants to provide critiques. Refocusing and revitalizing research on international macroeconomics like this is just one component of the Sloan Foundation's developing initiative on international financial regulation. The goal of this entire initiative is to inform, prepare, and eventually institute significant reforms of the international financial and monetary system.

    To stimulate new academic research on global aspects of the financial crisis and "Great Recession"

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $333,500
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2009

    To improve understanding of copyright economics in the digital age

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Stephen Maurer

    The "copyright clause" of the U.S. Constitution empowers Congress "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." Digitization has made intellectual property issues like this so important that, for the first time, the President has appointed a "copyright czar" to serve in the White House. Students face huge fines for sharing songs over the Internet, for example. Incentives to create or share innovations appear threatened. And the proposed "Google Settlement" could (arguably) monopolize access to certain books, including "orphan works," as discussed at the recent meeting hosted by the Sloan Foundation on "Open Access and Dissemination of Knowledge" and a brief filed by the United States Department of Justice in the U.S. District Court reviewing the Settlement. How can research help? Whereas patenting has been studied extensively by legal scholars and economists, thorough theoretical and empirical analyses of copyright policy and its effects in the digital age remain yet to be done. To this end, Berkeley Professor of Economics, Law, and Public Policy-Suzanne Scotchmer-proposes to study the benefits, costs, and distributional consequences of potential solutions to a set of copyright problems. One is compulsory licensing by collective rights management organizations like Broadcast Music, Inc. (music performance rights) and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. This project will help provide theoretical foundations for a Sloan Foundation initiative that will sponsor further theoretical, empirical, and interdisciplinary research on copyright policy and information goods.

    To improve understanding of copyright economics in the digital age

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  • grantee: Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP) Inc.
    amount: $19,580
    city: Lexington, MA
    year: 2009

    To survey, inform, and plan improvements in education about finance and decision making

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Solomon Garfunkel

    To survey, inform, and plan improvements in education about finance and decision making

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To develop a research program and data survey on the economics of the copyright system

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Scott Stern

    To develop a research program and data survey on the economics of the copyright system

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To prepare and post a comprehensive data base for studying the effects of rent control

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator David Autor

    To prepare and post a comprehensive data base for studying the effects of rent control

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  • grantee: Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, Inc.
    amount: $120,200
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To investigate the role of market discipline in regulating the risks taken by financial institutions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Hal Scott

    To investigate the role of market discipline in regulating the risks taken by financial institutions

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $107,410
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To promote research on the economics of household finance

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Peter Tufano

    To promote research on the economics of household finance

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  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $202,264
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To ensure that appropriate economic data will be collected and distributed concerning new policies for regulating Green House Gas emissions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Juha Siikamaki

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. will have significant impacts on our economy. There are strong positive and negative precedents for how to go about this. Powerful industry opposition to the transparent data collection and release was successfully overcome by prominent economists like Paul Joskow working through the Acid Rain Advisory Council. The thorough studies this made possible have helped make cap-and-trade for sulfur dioxide successful, most notably the definitive book Markets for Clean Air: The U.S. Acid Rain Program by Ellerman, Joskow, Schmalensee, Montero, and Bailey. Resources for the Future (RFF) has realized not only that it is critical to learn from past successes like this and build reporting requirements into the regulatory plans now being formulated, they have also recognized the need to train a new generation of scholars who will have a stake in monitoring and analyzing the data going forward many years. This project will also cooperate with an ongoing RFF study of how to measure carbon sequestration in forests that the Sloan Foundation has funded. Such grants do not necessarily signal the beginning of a full climate change program at the Sloan Foundation, but are consistent with our emphasis on promoting open access to information and enabling non-partisan policy relevant research.

    To ensure that appropriate economic data will be collected and distributed concerning new policies for regulating Green House Gas emissions

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $183,809
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2009

    To develop, test, and propagate innovative Bayesian methods for estimating and regulating risks taken on by financial institutions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Nicholas Kiefer

    Nicholas Kiefer of Cornell University is developing new analytical techniques directly motivated by and applicable to the needs of effective international bank regulation. Specifically, the Basel Accords set standards for determining how much capital a bank should be required to keep in reserve to guard against financial and operating risks. There are two main approaches that statisticians use to estimate probabilities. Frequentists think of the probability of an event (say, flipping heads with a coin) as the long run proportion of repeated trials when it occurs. By contrast, Bayesian statisticians approach an estimation problem with subjective beliefs about the "prior probability" and then concentrate on systematically using whatever data becomes available to update their estimates. Through further consultations with practitioners, more research publications, continued work with graduate students, and the development of a course on Bayesian risk estimation in finance, this project stands to improve the understanding, management, and regulation of financial risk.

    To develop, test, and propagate innovative Bayesian methods for estimating and regulating risks taken on by financial institutions

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  • grantee: Center for a New American Security, Inc.
    amount: $66,760
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To generate a literature review and research agenda that explore the industrial organizational puzzles arising from the globalization of defense-related industries

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Ethan Kapstein

    To generate a literature review and research agenda that explore the industrial organizational puzzles arising from the globalization of defense-related industries

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