Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $250,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To examine the effects of globalization on U.S. domestic regulatory policies, compliance, and economics in biopharmaceutical product manufacturing

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Anthony Sinskey

    The use of biopharmaceutical products has increased greatly over the past twenty years and is expected to continue to increase in volume and importance in years to come. Like many other manufacturing operations, there has been a substantial increase in the globalization of biopharmaceutical production within the last five to ten years. The FDA, the Government Accountability Office, and Congress are well aware of the challenges and tradeoffs involved when industries globalize, and in response the FDA has adjusted its inspection policies and practices. Funds from this grant will support a multidisciplinary team of researchers based at MIT's Center for Biomedical Innovation and led by Georgetown University Professor Jeffrey Macher, in their work to study how globalization has changed regulatory practice surrounding the production and distribution of biopharmaceuticals.

    To examine the effects of globalization on U.S. domestic regulatory policies, compliance, and economics in biopharmaceutical product manufacturing

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  • grantee: Clean Air Task Force
    amount: $10,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2010

    To plan a full scale study of US energy efficiency potential on the building and industrial sector

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Steven Brick

    To plan a full scale study of US energy efficiency potential on the building and industrial sector

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $605,347
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    For an annual and independent forum that will identify, analyze, discuss, and promote options for international monetary reform

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Eswar Prasad

    Multinational financial organizations like the International Monetary Fund (IMF) can sometimes become insular, politicized, ponderous, and unaccountable. That is why Raghuram Rajan from the University of Chicago and Barry Eichengreen from the University of California, Berkeley, plan on establishing an independent "Council on International Monetary Reform" (CIMR) to monitor, advise, consult with, and critique the IMF. These two professors are among the world's most respected and engaged authorities on international financial and monetary economics. The CIMR will consist of fewer than 18 members representing a balanced variety of countries, ideologies, and economic approaches. The grant budget provides for a CIMR planning conference followed by three annual meetings. The Council will interact with senior IMF officials, with attendees at the main IMF meetings each fall, and with the media as well. Establishing this CIMR is just one component of the Sloan Foundation's developing initiative on international financial regulation. The goal of this entire initiative is to inform, prepare, and eventually institute significant reforms of the international financial and monetary system.

    For an annual and independent forum that will identify, analyze, discuss, and promote options for international monetary reform

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $349,324
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To stimulate new academic research on global aspects of the financial crisis and "Great Recession"

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Kristin Forbes

    Surprisingly few ideas from the field of international economics have turned out to be useful either in the run-up to the recent financial upheaval or in its aftermath. To reinvigorate the field of international macroeconomics, Kristin Forbes of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Jeff Frankel of Harvard University are organizing a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) project on "The Global Financial Crisis." Pairing the two of them illustrates how their project, like everything NBER does, will be strictly non-partisan and aimed at developing fundamental understanding rather than explicit policy recommendation. For example, three basic research questions this project will concentrate on are: How did global imbalances contribute to the crisis? How was the crisis transmitted internationally? How has the global nature of the crisis affected macroeconomic policy ranging from fiscal and monetary policy to bank regulation and the role of the dollar? The plan is to issue a broad call for proposals to prepare and present papers on these topics, commission a dozen of the best submitted in the competitive solicitation, post them as working papers, and hold a pre-conference with assigned discussants to provide critiques. Refocusing and revitalizing research on international macroeconomics like this is just one component of the Sloan Foundation's developing initiative on international financial regulation. The goal of this entire initiative is to inform, prepare, and eventually institute significant reforms of the international financial and monetary system.

    To stimulate new academic research on global aspects of the financial crisis and "Great Recession"

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $333,500
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2009

    To improve understanding of copyright economics in the digital age

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Stephen Maurer

    The "copyright clause" of the U.S. Constitution empowers Congress "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." Digitization has made intellectual property issues like this so important that, for the first time, the President has appointed a "copyright czar" to serve in the White House. Students face huge fines for sharing songs over the Internet, for example. Incentives to create or share innovations appear threatened. And the proposed "Google Settlement" could (arguably) monopolize access to certain books, including "orphan works," as discussed at the recent meeting hosted by the Sloan Foundation on "Open Access and Dissemination of Knowledge" and a brief filed by the United States Department of Justice in the U.S. District Court reviewing the Settlement. How can research help? Whereas patenting has been studied extensively by legal scholars and economists, thorough theoretical and empirical analyses of copyright policy and its effects in the digital age remain yet to be done. To this end, Berkeley Professor of Economics, Law, and Public Policy-Suzanne Scotchmer-proposes to study the benefits, costs, and distributional consequences of potential solutions to a set of copyright problems. One is compulsory licensing by collective rights management organizations like Broadcast Music, Inc. (music performance rights) and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. This project will help provide theoretical foundations for a Sloan Foundation initiative that will sponsor further theoretical, empirical, and interdisciplinary research on copyright policy and information goods.

    To improve understanding of copyright economics in the digital age

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  • grantee: Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP) Inc.
    amount: $19,580
    city: Lexington, MA
    year: 2009

    To survey, inform, and plan improvements in education about finance and decision making

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Solomon Garfunkel

    To survey, inform, and plan improvements in education about finance and decision making

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To develop a research program and data survey on the economics of the copyright system

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Scott Stern

    To develop a research program and data survey on the economics of the copyright system

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $20,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To prepare and post a comprehensive data base for studying the effects of rent control

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator David Autor

    To prepare and post a comprehensive data base for studying the effects of rent control

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  • grantee: Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, Inc.
    amount: $120,200
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To investigate the role of market discipline in regulating the risks taken by financial institutions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Hal Scott

    To investigate the role of market discipline in regulating the risks taken by financial institutions

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $107,410
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    To promote research on the economics of household finance

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Peter Tufano

    To promote research on the economics of household finance

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