Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: New Venture Fund
    amount: $117,640
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2010

    To study experimentally the market for retail financial advice

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Antoinette Schoar

    The decisions individual households make about consumer financial products can be complicated, and so many people rely on expert advice. But is such advice any good? How well can consumers tell if it is or it isn't? Antoinette Schoar, a finance professor at MIT, and her collaborators have already conducted a pilot "audit study" to address the first question by dispatching trained actors to visit selected advisors. In addition to expanding this research on the supply side of the market for retail consumer financial advice, Schoar's team also plans new laboratory experiments to investigate the demand side of that market by measuring how consumers react to videotapes of different financial advisors. This project has already secured some highly competitive funding from the National Science Foundation, but more is needed to cover the experimental costs of sample sizes large enough to be statistically convincing. Sloan support will provide the necessary funds.

    To study experimentally the market for retail financial advice

    More
  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $63,249
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2010

    To investigate how consumers process complex financial data and decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator John Payne

    To investigate how consumers process complex financial data and decisions

    More
  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $85,682
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2010

    To perform experiments on how consumers' characteristics affect their annuity decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Eric Johnson

    To perform experiments on how consumers' characteristics affect their annuity decisions

    More
  • grantee: University of Pennsylvania
    amount: $35,000
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2010

    To devise a research program on choice engines that help consumers make better insurance decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Thomas Baker

    To devise a research program on choice engines that help consumers make better insurance decisions

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $70,385
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2010

    To test how choice architecture can affect how consumers make intertemporal tradeoffs

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Suzanne Shu

    To test how choice architecture can affect how consumers make intertemporal tradeoffs

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $34,951
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To study how risk databases and choice engines can improve consumers' financial decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Daniel Carpenter

    To study how risk databases and choice engines can improve consumers' financial decisions

    More
  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $122,263
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2010

    To study how and why consumers give up on making complex financial decisions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator John Lynch

    To study how and why consumers give up on making complex financial decisions

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $19,575
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To study career choice in terms of the benefits to society and tax costs to individuals

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Elaine Bernard

    To study career choice in terms of the benefits to society and tax costs to individuals

    More
  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $20,000
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2010

    To hold a workshop on "Frameworks for Systemic Risk Monitoring"

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Clifford Rossi

    To hold a workshop on "Frameworks for Systemic Risk Monitoring"

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $274,965
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2010

    To foster multilateral cooperation in trade, financial regulation, and macroeconomic policy by organizing a forum for leading academics and officials

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Feenstra

    Crises have a way of bringing out "every man for himself" instincts just when cooperation and coordination are most needed. This kind of thinking in 1930 resulted in America's Smoot-Hawley tariff. Its passage provoked the imposition of retaliatory tariffs by many other countries, reduced U.S. exports and imports by 50 percent, and, by most accounts, directly helped bring on the Great Depression. There is considerable reason, therefore, to avoid making similar mistakes in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis. Robert Feenstra and Alan Taylor are organizing a Global Forum for the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) on the topic "Globalization in an Age of Crisis: Multilateral Economic Cooperation in the Twenty-First Century." The event, to be hosted by the Bank of England, is specifically designed to facilitate interaction among leading academics and policymakers from around the world, including existing Sloan Foundation grantees working on theoretical, historical, or institutional aspects of international economics. Participants will be expected not only to critique the research, data, and analyses presented, but also to formulate plans and initiatives for fostering multilateral economic cooperation in the wake of financial turmoil.

    To foster multilateral cooperation in trade, financial regulation, and macroeconomic policy by organizing a forum for leading academics and officials

    More