Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $202,264
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To ensure that appropriate economic data will be collected and distributed concerning new policies for regulating Green House Gas emissions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Juha Siikamaki

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. will have significant impacts on our economy. There are strong positive and negative precedents for how to go about this. Powerful industry opposition to the transparent data collection and release was successfully overcome by prominent economists like Paul Joskow working through the Acid Rain Advisory Council. The thorough studies this made possible have helped make cap-and-trade for sulfur dioxide successful, most notably the definitive book Markets for Clean Air: The U.S. Acid Rain Program by Ellerman, Joskow, Schmalensee, Montero, and Bailey. Resources for the Future (RFF) has realized not only that it is critical to learn from past successes like this and build reporting requirements into the regulatory plans now being formulated, they have also recognized the need to train a new generation of scholars who will have a stake in monitoring and analyzing the data going forward many years. This project will also cooperate with an ongoing RFF study of how to measure carbon sequestration in forests that the Sloan Foundation has funded. Such grants do not necessarily signal the beginning of a full climate change program at the Sloan Foundation, but are consistent with our emphasis on promoting open access to information and enabling non-partisan policy relevant research.

    To ensure that appropriate economic data will be collected and distributed concerning new policies for regulating Green House Gas emissions

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $183,809
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2009

    To develop, test, and propagate innovative Bayesian methods for estimating and regulating risks taken on by financial institutions

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Nicholas Kiefer

    Nicholas Kiefer of Cornell University is developing new analytical techniques directly motivated by and applicable to the needs of effective international bank regulation. Specifically, the Basel Accords set standards for determining how much capital a bank should be required to keep in reserve to guard against financial and operating risks. There are two main approaches that statisticians use to estimate probabilities. Frequentists think of the probability of an event (say, flipping heads with a coin) as the long run proportion of repeated trials when it occurs. By contrast, Bayesian statisticians approach an estimation problem with subjective beliefs about the "prior probability" and then concentrate on systematically using whatever data becomes available to update their estimates. Through further consultations with practitioners, more research publications, continued work with graduate students, and the development of a course on Bayesian risk estimation in finance, this project stands to improve the understanding, management, and regulation of financial risk.

    To develop, test, and propagate innovative Bayesian methods for estimating and regulating risks taken on by financial institutions

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  • grantee: Center for a New American Security, Inc.
    amount: $66,760
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To generate a literature review and research agenda that explore the industrial organizational puzzles arising from the globalization of defense-related industries

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Ethan Kapstein

    To generate a literature review and research agenda that explore the industrial organizational puzzles arising from the globalization of defense-related industries

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $61,849
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To support a workshop on the data, analytical, and budgetary resources needed to regulate systematic financial risk

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Scott Weidman

    To support a workshop on the data, analytical, and budgetary resources needed to regulate systematic financial risk

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  • grantee: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences
    amount: $84,378
    city: Hanover, MD
    year: 2009

    To support and institutionalize a working relationship between INFORMS and the Industry Studies Association through formal academic panels at INFORMS Practitioner conferences

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Mark Doherty

    To support and institutionalize a working relationship between INFORMS and the Industry Studies Association through formal academic panels at INFORMS Practitioner conferences

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $123,954
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2009

    For research on Collaborative Filtering in Financial Markets

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard Zeckhauser

    For research on Collaborative Filtering in Financial Markets

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $44,159
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To provide expert input into the debate over automobile industry restructuring and to provide an agenda for related policy-oriented research in microeconomics

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Martin Baily

    To provide expert input into the debate over automobile industry restructuring and to provide an agenda for related policy-oriented research in microeconomics

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $26,073
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To develop policy advice and a research agenda for applying behavioral economics to federal regulatory design

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sendhil Mullainathan

    To develop policy advice and a research agenda for applying behavioral economics to federal regulatory design

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $323,115
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2009

    To create and launch an International Financial Crisis Database that provides open access information about many countries, many centuries, and many variables

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Carmen Reinhart

    Financial crises are thankfully infrequent. That means looking for patterns requires lots and lots of data. Two top macroeconomists, Ken Rogoff from Harvard and Carmen Reinhart from the University of Maryland, have been collecting financial crisis records covering many variables in many countries and going back many years. Their main finding is that, even though people always like to say, that this time is different, financial crises do follow patterns. Having heard about this work, scholars from around the world have contacted Reinhart and Rogoff about gaining access to their data and contributing even more data to expand the historical record. Rather than keeping this wealth of information to themselves, they plan to create a living and open-access database that researchers and the interested public can put to good use and help to expand. Launching this "International Financial Crisis Database" not only represents a great service to the field, it is also consistent with the Sloan Foundation's tradition of facilitating cooperation by scholars from around the world in compiling comprehensive, high quality, and open access research tools.

    To create and launch an International Financial Crisis Database that provides open access information about many countries, many centuries, and many variables

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $149,776
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2009

    To initiate research on the industrial organization of credit rating agencies

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Chester Spatt

    Credit rating agencies (CRAs) are supposed to help us measure the financial risk associated with securities issues by private and public organizations which turn to the public for financing. A bond rated AAA by Standard & Poor's, for example, means that its probability of default is deemed closer to zero than securities in any other category. On the other hand, a BB rating or lower earns it "junk" status, which the issuer must compensate for by offering investors a higher yield. Clearly, the issuers who pay for these ratings would like the highest grade possible. Do they "shop" by going to Moody's or Fitch or perhaps one of the lesser-known ratings agencies if they do not like Standard & Poor's estimates? Commentators have been quick to blame the CRAs for the current financial crisis since so many securities that they rated AAA or the equivalent are now considered toxic. Professor Chester Spatt has begun building the conceptual framework needed to address the important questions now being asked about CRAs.

    To initiate research on the industrial organization of credit rating agencies

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