Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Washington Center for Equitable Growth
    amount: $250,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2020

    To fund original research on the causes, consequences, and measurement of market power concentration, especially in high tech and platform industries

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Michael Kades

    To fund original research on the causes, consequences, and measurement of market power concentration, especially in high tech and platform industries

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  • grantee: Dartmouth College
    amount: $104,880
    city: Hanover, NH
    year: 2020

    To investigate causal factors responsible for gender and socioeconomic disparities in innovation

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Na'ama Shenhav

    To investigate causal factors responsible for gender and socioeconomic disparities in innovation

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $157,809
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2020

    To advance research on scientific career trajectories through collaborations between social scientists and RoRI science funders

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Donna Ginther

    To advance research on scientific career trajectories through collaborations between social scientists and RoRI science funders

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  • grantee: University of Southern California
    amount: $95,353
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2020

    To investigate the role of scientific quality in the diffusion patterns of science through different forms of digital news media

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Florenta Teodoridis

    To investigate the role of scientific quality in the diffusion patterns of science through different forms of digital news media

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  • grantee: Urban Institute
    amount: $396,298
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2020

    To build and test a prototype validation server that enables privacy-preserving research on administrative tax data

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Claire Bowen

    The grant funds a project by Claire Bowen, Lead Data Scientist at the Urban Institute, to facilitate more research on IRS data. Such data is extremely valuable for probing a series of pressing questions in social science, but the data is extremely sensitive. Strict privacy protection laws inhibit access to this data, such that hardly anyone outside the IRS has ever laid eyes on it. Bowen and her team propose to exploit recent mathematical advances in the theory of what’s called “differential privacy” to create tools that can be used to increase researcher access to IRS data without fear of violating the privacy of the American taxpayer. The project is divided into two parts. In the first, Bowen will create a high-quality synthetic dataset from original IRS data. Mathematical theory shows how to safely do this by reconstructing microdata details from statistical tables to which small bits of noise have been added. For many research questions, queries of this “noisy” synthetic dataset will provably yield the same answer that the same query would yield of the original IRS data, without the danger of exposing the identity of any of the individuals in the data. For some more complicated research questions--nonlinear calculations such as correlations or regression coefficients, for instance—there is no guarantee that queries of the synthetic noisy dataset will yield the same results as similar queries of the original. Without a means for further testing, researchers cannot be certain whether a relationship they find in the synthetic data is real or an artifact. The second part of Bowen’s project will address this concern through the construction of a “verification server.” The server, which would have access to the original IRS data, can verify whether a result reached through analysis of the synthetic dataset is consistent with the original data, guaranteeing the fidelity of research results without allowing researchers to see the sensitive data. If successfully constructed, this two-pronged system—synthetic dataset plus verification server—promises to provide researchers with reliable but privacy-protecting access to one of the most valuable datasets in social science.

    To build and test a prototype validation server that enables privacy-preserving research on administrative tax data

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  • grantee: University of Zurich
    amount: $399,646
    city: Zurich, Switzerland
    year: 2020

    To study the extent to which irrational behaviors and biases can be explained by inattention

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Behavioral and Regulatory Effects on Decision-making (BRED)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Nick Netzer

    Funds from this grant support a pair of projects aimed at understanding the role that attention and inattention play in consumer behavior and decision-making. In the first, economist Nick Netzer of the University of Zurich will develop the beginnings of a theoretical framework that treats attention as a relatively-fixed resource that decision-makers allocate as they move through the world and make decisions. Netzer will work to incorporate insights from psychology and neuroscience into standard economic decision-making models, allowing a more nuanced, psychologically realistic account of how humans make decisions, one that has the potential to more gracefully explain common behavioral phenomena, like why decisions made in a rush or while multi-tasking tend to be non-optimal. In the second phase of the project, Netzer will partner with behavioral neuroscientist Phil Tobler to test his framework. Tobler has designed a series of experiments that aim to quantify how increases in subjects’ attentional resources, occasioned by the administration of low-dose attention-enhancing drugs, affect their performance on decision-making tasks. The experiments will be able to demonstrate whether increased attentional resources improve decision-making in the ways predicted by Netzer’s models.

    To study the extent to which irrational behaviors and biases can be explained by inattention

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $498,364
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2020

    To develop datasets, tools, and findings that help support the recovery of universities and their academic researchers from the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Jason Owen-Smith

    Established in 2014, the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS) at the University of Michigan systematically collects, cleans, compiles, and curates administrative data from universities about their grant spending, including financial and HR records. IRIS then links these datasets with patenting, publishing, and other important information sources, notably confidential Census files. Using state-of-the-art privacy protection techniques, IRIS makes aggregate statistics available to the university community, while also making detailed microdata available to qualified researchers for further exploration. For example, IRIS researchers have traced how a particular grant supported a particular lab that hired a particular student who went on to publish papers, file patents, and start a company in the same particular field. Assembling this kind of information in bulk for statistical study has been the dream of generations of scholars concerned with innovation and of policymakers and administrators interested in evaluating the return on investments in research. Funds from this grant provide two years of operational support for IRIS, with a particular emphasis on projects to collect and analyze data that will advance our understanding of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on research activities within universities. Additional funds will support outreach activities aimed at helping IRIS expand its roster of partner universities and grow the number of affiliated scholars working to analyze the data collected.

    To develop datasets, tools, and findings that help support the recovery of universities and their academic researchers from the COVID-19 pandemic

    More
  • grantee: Institute for Advanced Study
    amount: $50,000
    city: Princeton, NJ
    year: 2020

    To support the study of the role that government plays in the progress of scientific and technological research

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Alondra Nelson

    To support the study of the role that government plays in the progress of scientific and technological research

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  • grantee: Princeton University
    amount: $40,000
    city: Princeton, NJ
    year: 2020

    To identify practical enhancements to Randomized Controlled Trials in order to increase the external validity of applied research in economics

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sylvain Chassang

    To identify practical enhancements to Randomized Controlled Trials in order to increase the external validity of applied research in economics

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $48,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2020

    To investigate the impact of autonomous vehicles on public health outcomes and labor markets across different socio-economic groups

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard Freeman

    To investigate the impact of autonomous vehicles on public health outcomes and labor markets across different socio-economic groups

    More
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