Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Wisconsin, Madison
    amount: $633,044
    city: Madison, WI
    year: 2012

    To expand the scholarly understanding of effective teaching and learning in STEM fields, and of undergraduate student persistence in STEM majors, by a combination of surveys, interviews, and classroom observations of students and faculty at seven colleges

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Mark Connolly

    In the 1990s, the Foundation supported a project by Elaine Seymour and Nancy Hewitt of the University of Colorado, Boulder and Mark Connolly at the University of Wisconsin, Madison to conduct extensive ethnographies of students at seven selective colleges and universities to determine why majors in STEM fields switch majors for other areas. The results of their work, Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences, provides one of the most interesting, comprehensive accounts of what factors drive retention and attrition among undergraduates in STEM fields. Fifteen years later, Seymour endeavors to return to this issue, updating the findings original reported in Talking About Leaving and expanding her analysis to include examination of efforts by professors, departments, and school administrators to shrink attrition in STEM fields. Funds from this grant provide partial support to Seymour, her colleague Mark R. Connolly, and their team to conduct a series of new interviews at the same seven institutions sampled in Talking About Leaving and to support their subsequent analysis of the data they collect. Their efforts promise to provide new insights into what has changed and what has stayed the same when it comes to why undergraduates pursue or abandon STEM degrees.

    To expand the scholarly understanding of effective teaching and learning in STEM fields, and of undergraduate student persistence in STEM majors, by a combination of surveys, interviews, and classroom observations of students and faculty at seven colleges

    More
  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $666,956
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2012

    To expand the scholarly understanding of effective teaching and learning in STEM fields, and of undergraduate student persistence in STEM majors, by a combination of surveys, interviews, and classroom observations of students and faculty at seven colleges

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Anne-Barrie Hunter

    In the 1990s, the Foundation supported a project by Elaine Seymour and Nancy Hewitt of the University of Colorado, Boulder and Mark Connolly at the University of Wisconsin, Madison to conduct extensive ethnographies of students at seven selective colleges and universities to determine why majors in STEM fields switch majors for other areas. The results of their work, Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences, provides one of the most interesting, comprehensive accounts of what factors drive retention and attrition among undergraduates in STEM fields. Fifteen years later, Seymour endeavors to return to this issue, updating the findings original reported in Talking About Leaving and expanding her analysis to include examination of efforts by professors, departments, and school administrators to shrink attrition in STEM fields. Funds from this grant provide partial support to Seymour, her colleague Mark R. Connolly, and their team to conduct a series of new interviews at the same seven institutions sampled in Talking About Leaving and to support their subsequent analysis of the data they collect. Their efforts promise to provide new insights into what has changed and what has stayed the same when it comes to why undergraduates pursue or abandon STEM degrees.

    To expand the scholarly understanding of effective teaching and learning in STEM fields, and of undergraduate student persistence in STEM majors, by a combination of surveys, interviews, and classroom observations of students and faculty at seven colleges

    More
  • grantee: Council of Graduate Schools
    amount: $400,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To enhance the skills of future faculty in the assessment of student learning in STEM fields

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Daniel Denecke

    This three-year grant supports the launch of a major initiative by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) to assist graduate students to gain knowledge in the assessment of student learning, both for the improvement of their own course-based teaching and for the reflective analysis of student learning outcomes at the level of a program or major. Partnering with five universities, CGS will partner with five universities to develop programs aimed at training graduate students in the best practices for assessing student learning and in implementing these practices in their courses, with special attention paid to large "gateway" science and math courses with high student attrition. Grant funds will also support three annual meetings and 2 summer workshops where learning assessment will be discussed, and a web-based clearinghouse for resources on the topic.

    To enhance the skills of future faculty in the assessment of student learning in STEM fields

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  • grantee: American Sociological Association
    amount: $5,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To establish a common standard for tracking demographic data and measuring the process and outcome of diversity?-enhancing programs in the sciences

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Sally Hillsman

    To establish a common standard for tracking demographic data and measuring the process and outcome of diversity?-enhancing programs in the sciences

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  • grantee: University of British Columbia
    amount: $20,000
    city: Vancouver, BC, Canada
    year: 2012

    To accelerate the rate of exploration, adaptation and effective integration of methods of instruction that better support improved student learning, with a focus on undergraduate STEM education

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Lorne Whitehead

    To accelerate the rate of exploration, adaptation and effective integration of methods of instruction that better support improved student learning, with a focus on undergraduate STEM education

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  • grantee: St. Olaf College
    amount: $19,500
    city: Northfield, MN
    year: 2011

    To develop a new community of practice on evidenced? based design for the planning of undergraduate learning spaces

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Jeanne Narum

    To develop a new community of practice on evidenced? based design for the planning of undergraduate learning spaces

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  • grantee: Wellesley College
    amount: $39,828
    city: Wellesley, MA
    year: 2011

    To improve recruitment and retention of students in STEM fields and produce graduates who understand the role of science in society

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Adele Wolfson

    To improve recruitment and retention of students in STEM fields and produce graduates who understand the role of science in society

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  • grantee: Business-Higher Education Forum
    amount: $56,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To develop a plan for piloting strategies to increase enrollment, persistence, and successful graduation of undergraduate students, particularly among women and underrepresented minorities (URMs), in the STEM disciplines in Maryland

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Stephen Barkanic

    To develop a plan for piloting strategies to increase enrollment, persistence, and successful graduation of undergraduate students, particularly among women and underrepresented minorities (URMs), in the STEM disciplines in Maryland

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  • grantee: American Society for Engineering Education
    amount: $397,371
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To enable the American Society for Engineering Education to launch a program to routinely collect and report data on undergraduate engineering completion rates and time-to-degree

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Brian Yoder

    One of the objectives of our small program focusing on student retention in STEM disciplines at the undergraduate and graduate levels is to encourage universities to obtain and pay attention to data on the migration of their own students into and out of STEM disciplines. In the absence of such data, which most universities do not have, many campuses are either unaware of or ignore high net out-migration of students from their STEM departments. The result is wasted resources, underutilized faculty and facilities, and, depending on why students leave these disciplines, disappointed educational aspirations. Funds from this grant support a project by the American Society for Engineering Education to collect and report data on completion rates and time-to-degree in undergraduate engineering programs. Initial data collection will begin in the summer of 2012 with ASEE inviting all 380 U.S. engineering schools to participate. Data will be published in aggregate form, reporting separately on public and private institutions; schools that accept students as freshmen, sophomores, or juniors; and transfer and non-transfer students. The collected information will provide a rich dataset for scholarly analysis of student flows into and out of engineering.

    To enable the American Society for Engineering Education to launch a program to routinely collect and report data on undergraduate engineering completion rates and time-to-degree

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  • grantee: MentorNet
    amount: $60,000
    city: Sunnyvale, CA
    year: 2011

    To develop and launch a campaign on web-based social channels to recruit students directly into MentorNet's mentoring program

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator David Porush

    To develop and launch a campaign on web-based social channels to recruit students directly into MentorNet's mentoring program

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