Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Open Knowledge Foundation
    amount: $749,624
    city: Cambridge, United Kingdom
    year: 2018

    To support adoption and use of a lightweight data packaging standard in order to reduce the frictions experienced in the acquisition, sharing, use, and reuse of research data

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Paul Walsh

    In 2015, a Sloan Foundation grant to Open Knowledge led to the creation of the “frictionless data” standard, a set of protocols for packaging tabular datasets in uniform ways that could be used, if adopted widely enough, to greatly simply the logistics of exporting, transporting, and importing data. This grant funds efforts by Open Knowledge to broaden adoption of the frictionless data standard through outreach to scholarly organizations, data platforms, analysis tools, and specific research fields. Over the three-year grant period, Open Knowledge will use grant funds to conduct outreach and support activities, structured partly as high-touch field/context-specific pilots, and partly as broader outreach and engagement to the wider user community.

    To support adoption and use of a lightweight data packaging standard in order to reduce the frictions experienced in the acquisition, sharing, use, and reuse of research data

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  • grantee: City College of New York - CUNY
    amount: $250,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To develop an open source framework for prototyping 3D scientific visualization applications using game engines

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Huy Vo

    Major video game rendering engines are capable of rich 3D environmental rendering and physics simulation, not to mention built-in virtual and augmented reality capabilities. They are, however, rarely utilized in scholarly research, in part because researchers who have explored their use for data visualization have had to manage the arduous task of configuring and structuring their research data in order to load it into the game engine. This grant funds a two-year initiative by Huy Vo of the City College of New York to dramatically lower barriers to the use of game engines for scientific visualization. In the first year, Vo will develop a standardized workflow and open source plug-in for the popular Unity 3D gaming engine that will enable the easy importation of research data, generation of geometries, and construction of interactive visualizations. In year two, Vo will pilot the plug-in himself in two research collaborations (one with CUNY researchers on climate adaptation and the reliability of power sector infrastructure, one with AT&T Research Labs on mobile antenna placement). He will also use it as the platform for student projects in a CUNY data visualization course.

    To develop an open source framework for prototyping 3D scientific visualization applications using game engines

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  • grantee: Rhizome
    amount: $19,800
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To help support a version of Wikibase that is easily deployed and used by institutions small and large, and to create a community of practice around Linked Data modeling

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Dragan Espenscheid

    To help support a version of Wikibase that is easily deployed and used by institutions small and large, and to create a community of practice around Linked Data modeling

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  • grantee: NumFOCUS
    amount: $20,000
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To support travel to and attendance at JuliaCon2018 by underrepresented minorities in computing who are users of and contributors to the Julia programming language

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Jane Herriman

    To support travel to and attendance at JuliaCon2018 by underrepresented minorities in computing who are users of and contributors to the Julia programming language

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  • grantee: Community Initiatives
    amount: $19,500
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To partially support the first CarpentryCon

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Tracy Teal

    To partially support the first CarpentryCon

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  • grantee: NumFOCUS
    amount: $20,000
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To support travel by students and junior faculty to a workshop focused on the development of scientific software using the R statistical computing language

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Karthik Ram

    To support travel by students and junior faculty to a workshop focused on the development of scientific software using the R statistical computing language

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  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $123,240
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2018

    To support community engagement and beta testing of Stencila Sheets

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Nokome Bentley

    To support community engagement and beta testing of Stencila Sheets

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  • grantee: University of Vermont
    amount: $683,273
    city: Burlington, VT
    year: 2018

    To lower barriers to large-scale research computing through the development of a distributed, volunteer, in-browser system for elastic computing resources

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Josh Bongard

    Distributed volunteer computing has not changed substantially since the late 1990s when the SETI@Home project offered a downloadable screensaver that used spare PC computing cycles to analyze radio astronomy data, and thereby allowed hundreds of thousands of citizens to participate in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Computer scientist Josh Bongard at the University of Vermont proposes to bring that idea of volunteer computing into the internet era by building a volunteer computing platform that lives in the web browser, allowing users who visit a special webpage to contribute computing capacity and/or disk storage to computational researchers. This grant will provide three years of support to Bongard and his team for the initial build out and deployment of the platform, which could complement or provide an alternative to local supercomputing facilities and cloud services from companies like Amazon or Microsoft.

    To lower barriers to large-scale research computing through the development of a distributed, volunteer, in-browser system for elastic computing resources

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  • grantee: University of Nebraska, Omaha
    amount: $449,423
    city: Omaha, NE
    year: 2018

    To advance understanding of open source project health and sustainability and how people and organizations prosper from open source work

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Matt Germonprez

    This grant supports research by information scientists Matt Germonprez (University of Nebraska) and Sean Goggins (University of Missouri) to develop and test rubrics for the evaluation of the health of online, open source development communities. Building on previous work that resulted in the successful Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software (CHAOSS) project and using a rich dataset drawn from GitHub and other sources, Germonprez and Goggins will investigate how definitions of the health of an online community might rightly vary depending on the type of community in question or type of project being jointly developed, how the injection of money into an online development community influences individual contributor behavior, and how individual decisions by contributors impact overall community health.

    To advance understanding of open source project health and sustainability and how people and organizations prosper from open source work

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  • grantee: University of Minnesota
    amount: $526,438
    city: Minneapolis, MN
    year: 2018

    To launch and expand a cross-institutional staffing model for curating disciplinary research data

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Lisa Johnston

    One crucial component of the current and future data workforce is the data curators who steward and curate research data in the interests of reproducibility and reuse. Academic libraries seeking to increase data curation support face a structural problem, however: it’s simply not possible to hire an expert data curator for every discipline. From 2016 to 2018, seed funding from the Sloan Foundation was used to plan a network that could facilitate the sharing of disciplinary data curation expertise across a cohort of partner universities. Funds from this grant support the launch and expansion of this Data Curation Network over the next three years. Initial participating institutions include Cornell; Duke; Johns Hopkins; Penn State; and the universities of Minnesota, Michigan, and Illinois at Urbana Champaign. The grant will support a modest amount of each participating data curator’s time, a network coordinator to be based at the University of Minnesota under the supervision of principal investigator Lisa Johnston, annual meetings of the network, and a business consultant to test business models and plan for sustainability beyond the funded launch period.

    To launch and expand a cross-institutional staffing model for curating disciplinary research data

    More
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