Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National Information Standards Organization
    amount: $207,533
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2013

    To study, propose, and develop community-based standards or recommended practices in the field of alternative metrics for research products

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Todd Carpenter

    Altmetrics aggregators who draw together diverse sources of data about the use of research products face a fundamental challenge: the myriad dissemination and archival platforms used by academics can make it difficult (if not impossible) to get consistent and normalized access to the data they need. While a general consensus is emerging among online publishers and repositories of articles, datasets, software, and other materials that such impact data could be valuable to their users, no clear standards exist governing how organizations should make that data accessible to others.This grant funds efforts by the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) to lead a two-year standard-setting process for altmetrics data. NISO will begin by hosting a series of scoping meetings over the first 12 months of the grant, bringing stakeholders together to map the most salient sources of data based on demand from altmetrics services as well as the researchers, funders, and deans that represent altmetrics end-users. After synthesizing those findings in a white paper for wide distribution, NISO will shift into a formal standards-setting process targeting the most pressing use cases, ultimately producing standard data exchange formats for adoption by those who produce and consume altmetrics data.

    To study, propose, and develop community-based standards or recommended practices in the field of alternative metrics for research products

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  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $77,947
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2013

    To support a landscape survey and workshop on data sharing from research using technological tools to study human behavior in digital environments

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Eszter Hargittai

    To support a landscape survey and workshop on data sharing from research using technological tools to study human behavior in digital environments

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  • grantee: Dartmouth College
    amount: $13,075
    city: Hanover, NH
    year: 2013

    To incorporate and improve MathOverflow, an open question-and-answer exchange site for mathematicians

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Francois Dorais

    To incorporate and improve MathOverflow, an open question-and-answer exchange site for mathematicians

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  • grantee: University of Oklahoma
    amount: $13,162
    city: Norman, OK
    year: 2012

    To support a meeting to explore digital models for the Isis history of science bibliography

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Stephen Weldon

    To support a meeting to explore digital models for the Isis history of science bibliography

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $400,000
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2012

    To support the technical development of a platform for archiving executable content and the environment in which it runs, as well as a plan for the institutionalization and ongoing sustainability of such an archive

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Mahadev Satyanarayanan

    Reproducing computational research requires more than having access to lines of code or compiled software. Reproducibility often requires running computations on an identical processor, or using a now defunct operating system. But computer hardware and software become obsolete surprisingly quickly, making the replication of old computational environments difficult or impossible. The advent of cloud computing and virtualization technology has opened a promising opportunity to address this problem. A researcher could preserve not only data and the computational algorithms used to analyze it, but the entire computational environment in which his research was conducted. Future researchers could then use virtualization to precisely replicate that environment, whatever hardware changes the future brings. The power of virtualization makes it not implausible to envision a library of virtual machines simulating every physical computer across the history of computing. This grant supports a project led by Carnegie Mellon computer scientist Mahadev Satyanarayanan and university librarian Gloriana St. Clair to build just such a library, called the "Open Virtual Machine Image Library", known as Olive. Funds will support the technical development of the OLIVE platform, initiatives to reduce the resources required to run archived virtual machines, and the development of a business plan and long-term sustainability strategy.

    To support the technical development of a platform for archiving executable content and the environment in which it runs, as well as a plan for the institutionalization and ongoing sustainability of such an archive

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  • grantee: Sage Bionetworks
    amount: $124,959
    city: Seattle, WA
    year: 2012

    To prototype interfaces for scholarly communication on top of the existing Synapse computational research management platform

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Erich Huang

    To prototype interfaces for scholarly communication on top of the existing Synapse computational research management platform

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  • grantee: Hunter College of the City University of New York
    amount: $57,708
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2012

    To develop a model for ScienceBetter, a network of domain-specific websites to support informal information dissemination about the innovative approaches to scholarly practice

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Kelle Cruz

    To develop a model for ScienceBetter, a network of domain-specific websites to support informal information dissemination about the innovative approaches to scholarly practice

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  • grantee: Planetwork NGO, Inc.
    amount: $525,800
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2012

    To develop and launch a system for web-scale annotation and review of online documents

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dan Whaley

    In a conventional journal, the mechanisms for feedback on published articles are limited to a letter to the editor or direct correspondence with the author. As an increasing quantity and diversity of scholarly products are disseminated on the web, one could imagine much more efficient and constructively visible commenting mechanisms. Initial experiments in so-called "post-publication review," however, have fallen flat. Comment boxes on online articles and other research materials overwhelmingly lie empty. Perhaps comment boxes are the wrong tool. Rather than asking a reader to comment on a full article, a much more granular approach might fare better, allowing readers to comment on a particular point, equation, or assumption in a published work. Funds from this grant support the development of hypothes.is, a particularly promising effort to build precisely such a granular web annotation system. This one-year grant to Planetwork NGO will support the design, testing, and launch of hypothes.is, bringing an innovative new pilot platform to fruition that has the potential to reshape how researchers communicate and interact with one another and with online scholarly resources.

    To develop and launch a system for web-scale annotation and review of online documents

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $420,640
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2012

    To further develop RunMyCode, a platform that links data and code for real-time reproduction of published studies

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Victoria Stodden

    In March of 2012, Christophe PŠ¹rignon and Christophe Hurlin unveiled RunMyCode (runmycode.org), a pilot platform for linking research datasets and code with scholarly articles. The site links published papers with a RunMyCode "companion website" that provides a real-time environment where researchers can rerun the computations reported in the paper and reproduce the experimental findings reported. Initially launched with 40 econometrics and finance papers, the platform is an innovative attempt to use the Web to enhance the reproducibility and verifiability -and thus the reliability-of scientific research. Funds from this grant support a project by Columbia University's Victoria Stodden, Chief Science Officer of RunMyCode, to expand and enhance the platform. Over 16 months, Stodden will test the RunMyCode model in a number of additional fields, including computational mathematics, statistics, and biostatistics. Stodden will also pilot integration with existing scholarly platforms, enabling researchers to discover relevant RunMyCode companion websites when looking at online articles, code repositories, or data archives. Additional funds support the development of a comprehensive business plan and funding strategy for RunMyCode.

    To further develop RunMyCode, a platform that links data and code for real-time reproduction of published studies

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $385,328
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2012

    To examine the impacts of online working paper repositories on the diffusion of scholarly ideas

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Erik Brynjolfsson

    Though working paper repositories have become integral to a number of fields, including high-energy physics and economics, the impact of working paper circulation on the actual practice and production of research is relatively unexplored. For example, does circulation of working papers on digital platforms actually improve the quality of the work, whether in revised drafts or in final published form? How do researchers decide what to spend time reading, given the lack of a referee system? Can usage data from working paper repositories predict ultimate publication in refereed journals and citation counts of articles after formal publication? Funds from this grant support a research project by Erik Brynjolfsson of MIT and his Ph.D. student Heekyung Kim aim to explore these and other questions using the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) as a case study. In order to isolate the impact of the circulation of research in working form, they will draw on SSRN's logs of web server traffic, working paper citation data, and full-text analysis of individual papers to compare the usage and citation of papers posted in bulk by departments as they join SSRN (which are often already published elsewhere) with that of papers that have evolved as working papers on SSRN in advance of publication. SSRN will also perform a randomized experiment of different search algorithms on the live site in order to better understand user discovery and filtering behavior. In addition to this research, grant funds will support a workshop to bring together publishers and platform developers with economists and other social scientists studying scholarly communication to discuss existing research findings and potential future collaborations in this area.

    To examine the impacts of online working paper repositories on the diffusion of scholarly ideas

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