Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Tennessee
    amount: $273,130
    city: Knoxville, TN
    year: 2012

    To study assessments by academic researchers of the trustworthiness of diverse scholarly information sources and channels

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Carol Tenopir

    We know from server log analysis that a substantial and growing percentage of the readers of any online academic article arrive not because they are browsing a given journal or author, but through the results of a search query using a search engine like Google or Bing or Proquest. We know little, however, about how researchers decide which items in search results are worth reading or citing or about how these changing information discovery and consumption patterns influence the choice of where one publishes one's work. This grant supports work by David Nicholas and Carol Tenopir of the University of Tennessee to better understand the behavior of academics as both producers and consumers of scholarly literature, in particular the role that judgments of trust and quality play in choices of publication channel, citation, and time investment in reading new material. Nicholas and Tenopir have built a unique corpus of web usage data from a number of major publishers' online platforms, which they will mine for insights into user behavior. Patterns of behavior in that usage data will inform the design of a series of focus groups and a broad survey to investigate reading and dissemination channel choices, and a series of "critical incident reports" will drill deeply into the underlying motivations for citation by asking select authors to walk through the discovery of and rationale for each citation in their most recent paper's bibliography.

    To study assessments by academic researchers of the trustworthiness of diverse scholarly information sources and channels

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  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $125,000
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2012

    To support the technical and organizational development of an altmetrics platform: Total-Impact

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Heather Piwowar

    To support the technical and organizational development of an altmetrics platform: Total-Impact

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $1,058,994
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2012

    To help social science journals process and publish the data associated with research articles

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Gary King

    According to a 2011 survey by Philip Glandon, only 35 percent of the 20 most cited journals in the field of economics have policies requiring as a condition of publication that authors make the data they use in their papers available to others. This is worrying, since empirical research requires quality control and lots of checking. Without access to the primary data a researcher works with, the larger economic community is unable to replicate her results, evaluate her faithfulness to her methodology, or re-use her data for other projects. What's worse, compliance is spotty even at those journals that do require authors post their research data, with fewer than half of all authors publishing the required datafiles. And when authors do make their data available, the files they post are often useless, since there are no discipline-wide standards governing what should be posted, what metadata should be included, or how programming code, procedural records, or explanations should appear. Funds from this grant support a project by Peter King to develop a software platform that has the potential to ameliorate some of these difficulties. King has developed the DataVerse Network, a platform specifically for publishing, sharing, referencing and analyzing social science datasets. With Sloan support, King will create a pilot platform that will allow participating journal editors to use the DataVerse Network in their article evaluation process, giving authors a uniform, standards-based capacity to upload and store research data, which can then be used both by editors and reviewers as an article moves through the publication process, and which will subsequently be available to the wider scientific community post-publication. The project represents a promising avenue in which information technology may help transform for the better scholarly communication.

    To help social science journals process and publish the data associated with research articles

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $214,720
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2012

    To support a network of practitioners working to transform scholarly communication via online community-building and a "Beyond the PDF 2" workshop

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Philip Bourne

    In early 2011, computational biologist Phil Bourne hosted a meeting at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) titled "Beyond the PDF," which brought together the emerging community of researchers, librarians, publishers, and developers who are rethinking scholarly communication in the sciences. The primary focus of the agenda was a discussion of the future shape of scientific articles. Presentations ranged from models for data or software publication to so-called "executable" papers, in which results are not simply described but are actually computed on the fly in live, adjustable figures. The initial "Beyond the PDF" meeting was unusually productive, bringing together a group of stakeholders to think creatively about scientific communication, and forming a nascent community that has continued to develop through a series of international conversations throughout the year. Funds from this grant support a second "Beyond the PDF" workshop, to be held in the summer of 2011. Support includes funds for agenda development and planning, as well as monies to hire a full-year staff member to focus on providing services to the growing community of scientists and technologists focused on thinking seriously and imaginatively about the future of scholarly communication.

    To support a network of practitioners working to transform scholarly communication via online community-building and a "Beyond the PDF 2" workshop

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  • grantee: The Wolfram Foundation
    amount: $123,453
    city: Champaign, IL
    year: 2012

    To prototype part of a Mathematical Heritage Library by constructing and demonstrating a computable database concerned with continued fractions

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Michael Trott

    To prototype part of a Mathematical Heritage Library by constructing and demonstrating a computable database concerned with continued fractions

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  • grantee: Planetwork NGO, Inc.
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2011

    To support a workshop on reputation systems and web annotation

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dan Whaley

    To support a workshop on reputation systems and web annotation

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  • grantee: Association of American Universities
    amount: $94,041
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To plan the launch of a sustainable media outlet for communicating with the public about academic research results

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Andrew Jaspan

    To plan the launch of a sustainable media outlet for communicating with the public about academic research results

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $124,996
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To create a graphical, open-source Citation Style Language (CSL) editor that can be used to develop, edit, and customize bibliographic reference styles

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Damon Jaggars

    To create a graphical, open-source Citation Style Language (CSL) editor that can be used to develop, edit, and customize bibliographic reference styles

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  • grantee: Library of Congress
    amount: $38,750
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To support a two-day meeting to identify gray literature preservation priorities in the sciences

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Martha Anderson

    To support a two-day meeting to identify gray literature preservation priorities in the sciences

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  • grantee: Social Science Research Network
    amount: $60,490
    city: Rochester, NY
    year: 2011

    To develop a plan for extending the Social Science Research Network's scope to include research data as well as preprint articles

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Gregory Gordon

    To develop a plan for extending the Social Science Research Network's scope to include research data as well as preprint articles

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