Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Center for State and Local Government Excellence
    amount: $109,450
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To collect, analyze and code data on U.S. state pension statues and related policies that impact a retiree’s ability to continue working or return to work

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Joshua Franzel

    To collect, analyze and code data on U.S. state pension statues and related policies that impact a retiree’s ability to continue working or return to work

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  • grantee: National Press Foundation
    amount: $106,553
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To provide a four-day training in the public understanding of working longer to a set of 20 journalists

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Sandy Johnson

    To provide a four-day training in the public understanding of working longer to a set of 20 journalists

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  • grantee: Center for Economic and Policy Research
    amount: $15,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To analyze the Contingent Work Supplements (CWS) in order to better understand the incidence of nonstandard work arrangements among varying demographic groups and to assess changes found between 1995-2017

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Eileen Appelbaum

    To analyze the Contingent Work Supplements (CWS) in order to better understand the incidence of nonstandard work arrangements among varying demographic groups and to assess changes found between 1995-2017

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $971,750
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To examine the link between the receding retirement age of older workers and the shifts in demand for these workers associated with the expansion of artificial intelligence and robotic substitutes

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Freeman

    Funds from this grant support research by Harvard economist Richard Freeman that will link and then analyze 16 different data sets in order to examine the relationship between the increased employment/postponement of retirement by older workers and shifts in the demand for these workers associated with the changing composition of industries and the expansion of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotic automation. Freeman will examine differences in employment and earnings of these workers by gender, education, health status, and income, and by industry, occupation, and firm and will study the impacts of these technologies on earnings, as well as employment. Overall, this project seeks to identify new patterns of work and retirement, determine their effect on worker well-being, and project whether these patterns are likely to continue among younger cohorts as they age. In addition to his own analysis, Freeman will commission 10 additional papers from leading economists using this new linked dataset, which will then be made available for public access through application to the Census Bureau research centers. All papers will be published as NBER Working Papers and submitted for publication in leading peer-reviewed journals.

    To examine the link between the receding retirement age of older workers and the shifts in demand for these workers associated with the expansion of artificial intelligence and robotic substitutes

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  • grantee: National Opinion Research Center
    amount: $285,804
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2017

    To increase the amount and quality of news coverage of the economics of working longer, by training fellows in economics and data-driven journalism and by supporting the development of an original survey and enhanced coverage

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Trevor Tompson

    This grant provides twenty months of continued support for a partnership between National Opinion Research Center (NORC) and the Associated Press (AP) to marry NORC’s research expertise with AP’s media reach to create a vehicle for promoting public understanding of the barriers and facilitators, as well as the causes and patterns, to people working beyond conventional retirement age in the United States. Funds from this grant will provide twenty months of salary support to a NORC-AP journalism fellow, who is selected through a competitive application process. The fellowwill cover the older work force beat, producing thoughtful, scientifically informed, high-quality articles on a variety of issues at the intersection of aging and work, including retirement, work and health, productivity, older workers and the gig economy, and the economic impact of an aging work force on businesses, pensions, and government programs like Social Security. In addition, NORC will field a high-quality, nationally representative survey of older adults about issues facing older workers with the results distributed nationwide through the AP. Survey reporting will be supplemented with reporting on new economic research on the older work force and survey data will be made freely available to researchers in a public-use dataset.

    To increase the amount and quality of news coverage of the economics of working longer, by training fellows in economics and data-driven journalism and by supporting the development of an original survey and enhanced coverage

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $375,475
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To renew support for a three-year postdoctoral program on the economics of the aging workforce

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Nicole Maestas

    This grant provides four years of renewed support to a postdoctoral fellowship program run by the National Bureau of Economic Research which supports talented young researchers interested in working on the economics of an aging workforce. Fellows receive a one-year stipend to carry out research at NBER’s office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as well as limited funds for research-related purposes. In addition, fellows have the opportunity to participate in NBER’s weekly lunch seminars, NBER’s Summer Institute workshops on Aging and Labor Studies, relevant activities related to the larger NIA-NBER fellows program on Aging, and collaborative research and networking activities with a similar postdoctoral fellowship program at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Selection of the three fellows per year will be made by a panel of experts who are members of both the Aging and Labor Studies NBER programs. Nicole Maestas of Harvard University will chair the selection committee, which will include leading scholars in the fields of labor economics and the economics of aging. The committee’s decisions will be based on their evaluation of the fellows’ potential to make an important contribution to the understanding of the behavior of older workers and the functioning of labor markets for these workers.

    To renew support for a three-year postdoctoral program on the economics of the aging workforce

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  • grantee: Urban Institute
    amount: $1,876,012
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To identify, simulate, and evaluate policy reform options that could reduce work disincentives at older ages, more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults, and ensure long-term solvency of U.S. retirement programs

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Johnson

    To make sound decisions about potential changes to Social Security, Medicare, and other retirement programs, policymakers need reliable, objective predictions based on the best available data on how reforms would likely affect retiree income and benefits, labor market activities, taxpayer burdens, and program costs and solvency. The predictions are often provided by DYNASIM, the Urban Institute’s well-respected microsimulation model. This grant funds a project by the Urban Institute to expand and improve the DYNASIM model. DYNASIM is a more ambitious tool than nearly every policy evaluation model in use today. It attempts to predict a wider range of outcomes than do most models developed by CBO or the analytical offices of Cabinet agencies. For example, a raise in the early and full retirement ages would almost certainly affect retirement ages, earnings, savings patterns, and the distribution of incomes of those 60 to 74 years in age. It may also influence marriage rates and living arrangements, and could indirectly affect the health status and health insurance coverage of some older Americans. Simple models often focus on just one or two of these outcomes. DYNASIM’s predictions, however, attempt to capture all these indirect effects. With this grant, the Urban Institute will develop further the predictive capabilities of DYNASIM so that the model can be used to produce credible and detailed predictions of the impact of government policy reforms that affect the nation’s elderly. The programs of interest include Social Security, including its Disability Insurance (SSDI), Medicare, tax policies that affect retirement saving, and important components of Medicaid. The grant will examine how reforms in one or more of these programs will affect old-age labor supply, the prevalence of old-age poverty, the distribution of income in old age, out-of-pocket spending on health care in old age, and tax burdens of the elderly. The DYNASIM model will also produce predictions of the effects of these policy changes on both the elderly and the nonelderly. In addition to providing for the needed improvements, the grant includes funds to maintain DYNASIM during the project period, such as by incorporating the latest economic and demographic assumptions used by Social Security and updating tax and other policy parameters. In addition, the Urban Institute team will use some funds to train additional DYNASIM analysts, to ensure the sustainability of the model, and to find ways to provide access to other researchers, so that it can continue to provide the research and policy community with the best information on the effects of retirement policy reforms after the grant period ends.

    To identify, simulate, and evaluate policy reform options that could reduce work disincentives at older ages, more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults, and ensure long-term solvency of U.S. retirement programs

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $281,750
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To provide partial support for the International Social Security (ISS) project in order to understand how labor force participation responds to Social Security reforms in 12 countries and to draw lessons for the United States

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Courtney Coile

    This grant supports an ongoing NBER project, the International Social Security (ISS) project, led by Courtney Coile and Axel Bцrsch-Supan, that will examine a variety of retirement and social safety net reforms that have been implemented in other countries, including Canada, Japan, and nine European countries. Teams of investigators from 12 countries (11 mentioned above and the U.S) will examine the precise financial incentives associated with those reforms and the effects of the changed financial incentives on work, retirement, and claiming behavior at older ages. The studies will use a common template, which will enable meaningful, if complicated, comparisons across countries. While the institutional and cultural contexts differ across countries to various degrees, the commonality of demographic pressures and the limited scope of options for restoring financial sustainability to retirement programs make the experiences of other countries directly relevant to Social Security reform discussions in the United States. 

    To provide partial support for the International Social Security (ISS) project in order to understand how labor force participation responds to Social Security reforms in 12 countries and to draw lessons for the United States

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $657,748
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2017

    To support research that addresses how work conditions shape observed employment transitions of older workers and how age and employment status affect preferences for working conditions

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Nicole Maestas

    This grant funds follow-up research by Harvard’s Nicole Maestas in the aftermath of the 2015 American Working Conditions Survey (AWCS). The AWCS is alone among major workplace surveys in its attention to cataloging both the pecuniary and the nonpecuniary characteristics of jobs, which allows researchers to analyze how these characteristics shape older Americans’ decisions regarding working into later ages. In tandem with the AWCS, Maestas fielded a stated preference experiment designed to assess how much older workers value different job characteristics. Funds from this grant will allow Maestas to reconnect with survey participants three years after the original ACWS survey, allowing the collection of new data and enabling a clearer look into both how workplace characteristics shape retirement decisions and the dynamics of how worker preferences about the desirability of various workplace characteristics change over time. 

    To support research that addresses how work conditions shape observed employment transitions of older workers and how age and employment status affect preferences for working conditions

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  • grantee: Princeton University
    amount: $383,891
    city: Princeton, NJ
    year: 2017

    To improve the Contingent Worker Supplement (CWS) questions in order to increase validity, reduce measurement error, and include appropriate categories of alternative workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alan Krueger

    Our understanding of the size and characteristics of the alternative work force—freelance workers, contract workers, contingent workers, on-call workers, temporary workers, etc.—is severely limited by inadequate federal surveys. They are inadequate in several ways: lack of a clear and agreed upon taxonomy of work; questionable phrasing of questions; sporadic fielding of the surveys; and failure to take into account entirely new forms of work, often referred to as the gig economy, the platform economy, or the on-demand economy.   The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is fielding its first Contingent Work Survey (CWS) in 10 years. This grant funds a project by Princeton economist Alan Krueger and Edward Freeland, Director of the Princeton Survey Research Center to identify and examine ways to improve the CWS questions in order to increase validity, reduce measurement error, and determine if new or additional categories of alternative work are needed.

    To improve the Contingent Worker Supplement (CWS) questions in order to increase validity, reduce measurement error, and include appropriate categories of alternative workers

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