Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $407,959
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To investigate the divergence of retirement and mortality trends between high- and low-income workers and determine the impact of the interaction of these two trends on the income distribution of the aged and the optimal design of public pension formulas

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Gary Burtless

    This grant to The Brookings Institution funds the work of economists Gary Burtless and Bary Bosworth, who are investigating whether longer lifespans coupled with longer work lives and delayed retirement leads to greater income disparities among Americans aged 60 to 74. Burtless and Bosworth will estimate the effects of delayed retirement on the distribution of annual incomes among workers and retirees between 60 and 74; assess the effects of delayed retirement on inequality trends among individuals past age 75; estimate the effects of delayed retirement and lengthening life spans on the distribution of lifetime incomes; and offer conclusions about the public policy implications of the changing relationship among income, expected longevity, and retirement behavior.The income distribution issues cited above are particularly important as Congress considers reforms to the Social Security and Medicare systems in order to maintain their financial solvency. The tradeoff between restoring financial balance and avoiding adverse distributional effects is a key consideration in designing sensible reforms. The results from this research are essential to understanding possible adverse distributional effects.

    To investigate the divergence of retirement and mortality trends between high- and low-income workers and determine the impact of the interaction of these two trends on the income distribution of the aged and the optimal design of public pension formulas

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $174,458
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2013

    To expand the understanding of age discrimination in employment through comprehensive examination of Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) charges

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Sarah von Schrader

    In 1967, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) was passed by Congress with the intent to “promote employment of older persons based on their ability rather than age; to prohibit arbitrary age discrimination in employment.” While it has been viewed as successful in increasing employment rates for older workers, research suggests that older worker stereotypes and age discrimination still persist—or at least the perception of this discrimination still exists. Age-related charges of discrimination brought forward to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) have been on the increase. Whilst that may be the case, there has not been systematic examination of these charges.This grant funds work by a team led by Sarah Von Schrader of Cornell University that combines descriptive analyses with model-based approaches to better understand the phenomenon of perceived age-discrimination in the workplace. The study will look at a number of factors, including the characteristics of ADEA charges, charging parties, and employers receiving charges over time; individual and contextual factors associated with the outcomes of ADEA charges; and the characteristics of employers, along with local labor market factors, associated with ADEA charges. Von Schrader and her team will use restricted access data sets from the EEOC in conducting this research. By developing a better understanding of perceived discrimination in the workplace, it will be possible to better identify policies and practices to mitigate such discrimination.

    To expand the understanding of age discrimination in employment through comprehensive examination of Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) charges

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  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $282,710
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To better understand the retirement and work prospects of currently active college women by connecting events in their early adult lives to their later employment histories

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Claudia Goldin

    This grant funds work by economic historian Claudia Goldin and labor economist Lawrence Katz to understand how education, employment, marriage, fertility, and health events from college to mid-life shape employment and retirement later in life among college-educated women. Goldin and Katz will study cohorts born from the mid-1930s to the early 1960s and that entered college from around 1950 to 1980. These cohorts, born up to 30 years apart, will provide sharp contrasts and differences in early, late, or no marriage; types of subjects majored in college; work patterns and whether they were intermittent or continuous; and if and when they had children. All of these factors contribute to how long college-educated women remain in the labor force and under what conditions. While existing research examines distinct cohorts of women, this will be the first study to link systematically the older, younger, and transitional cohorts.In addition to peer-reviewed articles and research papers, the project team will organize a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) conference and produce an NBER volume on women working longer.

    To better understand the retirement and work prospects of currently active college women by connecting events in their early adult lives to their later employment histories

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  • grantee: George Mason University
    amount: $89,951
    city: Fairfax, VA
    year: 2013

    To identify the primary causes of age-related differences in training outcomes and develop and examine interventions to ameliorate age-related performance discrepancies

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Eden King

    To identify the primary causes of age-related differences in training outcomes and develop and examine interventions to ameliorate age-related performance discrepancies

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $19,200
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2013

    To study the effects of academic hiring, promotion, diversity, and work-life policies on the professional advancement of STEM faculty from underrepresented groups, and overall faculty diversity

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Frank Dobbin

    To study the effects of academic hiring, promotion, diversity, and work-life policies on the professional advancement of STEM faculty from underrepresented groups, and overall faculty diversity

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  • grantee: Finance Flows, Inc
    amount: $20,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To establish a non-profit designed to launch and administer a 2 year fellowship work program re-employing older (50+) senior managers in multiple New York City metro area industries

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Joan Biermann

    To establish a non-profit designed to launch and administer a 2 year fellowship work program re-employing older (50+) senior managers in multiple New York City metro area industries

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  • grantee: TIAA-CREF Institute
    amount: $104,650
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To convene a select group of policymakers, think tanks, academic researchers, & press to consider two approaches, suggested by the National Academy of Sciences study, that address the economic challenges of an aging population-working longer & saving more

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Stephanie Bell-Rose

    To convene a select group of policymakers, think tanks, academic researchers, & press to consider two approaches, suggested by the National Academy of Sciences study, that address the economic challenges of an aging population-working longer & saving more

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  • grantee: ReServe Elder Service, Inc.
    amount: $45,000
    city: Brooklyn, NY
    year: 2013

    To develop a business plan for ReCap, a new workforce development strategy for older workers who face barriers to employment due to their age, skill level and workplace requirements

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Mary Bleiberg

    To develop a business plan for ReCap, a new workforce development strategy for older workers who face barriers to employment due to their age, skill level and workplace requirements

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $487,109
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2012

    To improve measurement and modeling of the evolving labor market behaviors, expectations, and preferences of middle and upper-middle income households headed by older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Andrew Caplin

    The most popularly used survey of older Americans-the National Institute on Aging's (NIA) Health and Retirement Study (HRS)-has a limited number of questions that address with any specificity the ways that Americans work into their 60s and 70s as they transition from full-time employment to full-time retirement. What is needed is an opportunity to devise and test questions that will better capture the aspirations, expectations, and work patterns of aging Americans so as to improve the measurement and modeling of older Americans' evolving labor market behaviors. This grant to fund the work of New York University economist Andrew Caplin provides such an opportunity. Caplin has formed a partnership with NIA and Vanguard, one of the world's largest investment management companies, to createe a panel of older Americans, entitled, the MINYVan panel. This MINYVan panel will allow Caplin and colleagues to experiment with questions that will better measure labor market preferences and opportunities of an aging population. They will also pose questions concerning expectations of future work and pay and questions concerning hypothetical behavior in various possible future contingencies. For example, they will investigate whether or not an individual who chooses to stop work believes that they would be able to return to work for high pay at some point in the future. By studying panel responses Caplin and colleagues will begin to develop appropriate structural models of labor market behavior and design a complementary survey that will focus on labor market preferences and behaviors. This work will not only yield interesting insights in itself, but will be useful to future discussions about how how labor-market activities questions on the HRS can be made more robust.

    To improve measurement and modeling of the evolving labor market behaviors, expectations, and preferences of middle and upper-middle income households headed by older Americans

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $101,491
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2012

    To hold a two-day conference at Stanford University on aspects of the institutional adjustments needed to accommodate longer lifetimes, particularly related to working longer and retirement

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    To hold a two-day conference at Stanford University on aspects of the institutional adjustments needed to accommodate longer lifetimes, particularly related to working longer and retirement

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