Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $498,059
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2012

    To obtain a comprehensive characterization of the role of firms in labor force transitions of older workers in the United States with comparative analyses to the role of firms in Germany

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Till von Wachter

    This grant funds research investigating demand for older workers in labor markets and how the behavior of firms affect older worker's decisions to work beyond conventional retirement age. Led by Till Von Wachter, previously of Columbia and now at UCLA and RAND, David Card of UC Berkeley, and Lars Vilhuber of the U.S. Census Bureau, the research team will analyze the role of firms in labor force transitions of older workers in the United States, with a comparative analysis to firm behaviors in Germany. Their research addresses four critical questions. "First, do common firm-level events, such as mass layoffs and plant closings, contribute significantly to observed retirement rates? Second, is there a significant difference in the rate of early retirement among firms (net of worker characteristics)? Third, do differences in firm-specific retirement rates correlate with more commonly studied firm-level differences in wages and productivity, and what do the results imply for the sources of firm-level differences in retirement rates? Fourth, is the role of firms in retirement similar in Germany?" In addition to providing valuable insights, the effort promise to draw scholarly attention to the need for additional research on the demand side of the older worker labor market.

    To obtain a comprehensive characterization of the role of firms in labor force transitions of older workers in the United States with comparative analyses to the role of firms in Germany

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  • grantee: George Mason University
    amount: $100,000
    city: Fairfax, VA
    year: 2012

    Winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Linda Harber

    Winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Best Practices for Faculty Retirement Transitions

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $3,200,145
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2012

    To follow up the original nationally representative High School and Beyond (HSB) study to produce a valuable new data infrastructure and research findings about the foundation for working longer

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Chandra Muller

    This grant funds a project by sociologist Chandra Muller and economist Sandra Black at the University of Texas to re-contact and survey the nationally representative High School and Beyond (HSB) sophomore class cohort, a sample of nearly 15,000 individuals, just before most turn 50 years old. The original HSB surveyed this cohort every two years from 1980 to 1986, and again in 1992. Data collected include metrics on cognitive and noncognitive skills, parent and teacher evaluations, high school transcripts, student financial aid records, utilization patterns of public entitlement programs, college transcripts, early-life work experiences, and answers to detailed student questionnaires. Resurveying this cohort now, more than 30 years after the initial survey, will create a uniquely rich and robust public use dataset that will enable scholars from diverse disciplines to study in previously unavailable detail the relationship between early-life human capital and later-life outcomes.

    To follow up the original nationally representative High School and Beyond (HSB) study to produce a valuable new data infrastructure and research findings about the foundation for working longer

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  • grantee: National Academy of Social Insurance
    amount: $450,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To help Americans understand how they can enhance their long-term retirement security by working longer and delaying Social Security benefits

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Virginia Reno

    Lack of confidence about the future of Social Security has led many Americans mistakenly to believe that they had better file for Social Security benefits as soon as they are eligible (typically when they turn 62), so they can lock in their benefits before Social Security "is gone." Yet Social Security's finances are more secure than most Americans think, and analysis shows that for the typical American it is economically advantageous to start taking benefits no earlier than full retirement age (now 66) and in many cases to delay taking benefits until age 70. To help American workers make retirement decisions based on accurate information, it is imperative to both clarify the future of Social Security's finances and its capacity to meet future benefit commitments and to communicate the advantages of delaying benefits. Funds from this grant support a project by the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) to design and execute an integrated public education initiative aimed at helping middle- and lower-income Americans understand how they can enhance their long-term retirement security by working longer and delaying receipt of Social Security benefits. NASI will produce a series of accurate, high-quality written, visual, and graphic materials accessible to the public that will lay out the economic advantages of working longer and delaying Social Security and combat commonly held misconceptions about the economics of retirement. Based on the most up-to-date research, the materials will then be disseminated to the public through financial planners, HR professionals, journalists, and non-profit community-based grassroots organizations.

    To help Americans understand how they can enhance their long-term retirement security by working longer and delaying Social Security benefits

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  • grantee: The Urban Institute
    amount: $423,824
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2012

    To support research on employment prospects for less-educated older workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Johnson

    Men born between 1940 and 1944, who have no more than high school diplomas, are nearly 50 percent more likely than college graduates to claim Social Security benefits at age 62. There are many reasons why less-educated older adults retire early. Workers with limited education have greater incidences of poor health and histories of physically demanding work and are more apt to be employed in the public sector and unionized workplaces, where defined benefit pension plans often discourage work at older ages. But little is known about which of these or other factors are most important in the decision of older Americans with limited educations to end work early. Even less is known about the nature of the work trajectories of those with limited educations who go on to work after 62. This grant supports research by The Urban Institute's Richard Johnson, to investigate these questions. Combining data on detailed job characteristics from the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Information Network (O*Net) with household survey data from the Health and Retirement Study, American Community Survey, and the 1980, 1990, and 2000 decennial censuses, Johnson will investigate how job characteristic and employment and earnings patterns vary by education and how those patterns have changed over the last 30 years. In addition to the research, additional grant funds will support an expert roundtable to discuss the findings and their potential implications for the future course of public policy.

    To support research on employment prospects for less-educated older workers

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $250,000
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2012

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jennifer Raymond

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

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  • grantee: Upstate Medical University
    amount: $25,000
    city: Syracuse, NY
    year: 2012

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Paula Trief

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

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  • grantee: Washington University in St. Louis
    amount: $250,000
    city: St. Louis, MO
    year: 2012

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Diana Gray

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

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  • grantee: Boston University
    amount: $250,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2012

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Emelia Benjamin

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $25,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2012

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lydia Howell

    To further accelerate the school's progress in achieving faculty career flexibility. Funds granted to institution as a winner of the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Faculty Career Flexibility in Medical Schools

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