Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $599,839
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2017

    To support a conference series in order to foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    The annual Stanford Institute Economic Research (SIEPR) Working Longer Conferences allow researchers working at the intersection of aging and work to present their findings, compare approaches, imagine new projects, and get constructive feedback from fellow researchers. Over the past four years, more than 90 different scholars have presented high-quality research as authors, co-authors, or discussants, and each conference has averaged 60 to 70 attendees. The conferences also provide the opportunity for Sloan to identify new potential grantees and to introduce and welcome junior scholars to the community of working longer researchers. This grant provides funds to Stanford University to continue organizing, administering, and hosting the SIEPR Working Longer conferences for an additional three years.

    To support a conference series in order to foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $80,668
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2016

    To convene a conference of academic researchers and human resource practitioners to discuss practical ideas to apply emerging academic research to managing an aging workforce

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    To convene a conference of academic researchers and human resource practitioners to discuss practical ideas to apply emerging academic research to managing an aging workforce

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  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $125,000
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2016

    To investigate the impact of the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test, which creates substantial disincentives for work, on the elderly employment rate

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Damon Jones

    To investigate the impact of the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test, which creates substantial disincentives for work, on the elderly employment rate

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  • grantee: ProPublica
    amount: $125,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2016

    To research and publish data-driven systems investigations of the major trends, structures and programs shaping the lives of Americans age 60 forward with an eye to uncovering where these arrangements might limit opportunities or fail to adequately serve both 60-plus individuals and the broader society

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Peter Gosselin

    To research and publish data-driven systems investigations of the major trends, structures and programs shaping the lives of Americans age 60 forward with an eye to uncovering where these arrangements might limit opportunities or fail to adequately serve both 60-plus individuals and the broader society

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $125,000
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2016

    To analyze how technological change affected the retirement behavior of older workers in the last three decades with a case study of computerization, arguably the most important technological change of our era

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Peter Hudomiet

    To analyze how technological change affected the retirement behavior of older workers in the last three decades with a case study of computerization, arguably the most important technological change of our era

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $399,958
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2016

    To find out how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened, and whether the trend towards working at older ages is likely to continue in the future, especially in view of adverse trends in health

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Susann Rohwedder

    The ability to accurately predict the U.S. labor force participation rate among older workers is important, not least because it bears significantly on the finances of the Social Security system. Traditional methods for predicting this crucial statistic involve extrapolating from past trends. Past trends, however, may not continue. Over the past 25 years, for instance, the labor force participation rate of the population aged 60 to 69 has been increasing, in part because Americans in their 60s were getting progressively healthier. But recent studies suggest this is no longer the case. What effects, if any, will the halting of this trend toward better health in older Americans have on labor force participation rates? This grant funds the work of researchers Susann Rohwedder and Michael Hurd, who are examining this issue. Using twelve waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), Rohwedder and Hurd will study how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened and examine whether the trend toward working at older ages is likely to continue, especially in view of adverse trends in health. One particular focus of their work will be the relationship between labor force participation rates and individuals’ forecasts about how long they will continue to work as they age, examining how predictive these forecasts have been in the past and how their predictive power varies along multiple dimensions. Once this relationship is better understood, the hope is to use this knowledge to inform forecasts of labor force participation rates going forward.

    To find out how labor force participation at older ages has increased even as some determinants of participation have worsened, and whether the trend towards working at older ages is likely to continue in the future, especially in view of adverse trends in health

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  • grantee: Urban Institute
    amount: $204,951
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To identify policy reforms that could reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Johnson

    This grant supports the planning of a project led by Richard Johnson and Eugene Steuerle of the Urban Institute to identify, simulate, and evaluate policy reforms that, taken alone, as well as simultaneously, would reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults. In so doing, this larger project would provide important new information about the likely costs and benefits of reforming Social Security, Medicare, employer-sponsored retirement plans, and tax incentives for retirement saving. The larger project will use DYNASIM, the Urban Institute’s dynamic microsimulation model, to simulate the likely impact of potential retirement program reforms across a vast array of dimensions, including effects on employment at older ages; on older adults’ household wealth; on annual income; on lifetime Social Security benefits; on income tax payments; and on out-of-pocket spending on medical care. The team will also model the effects of hypothetical reforms on government revenues and outlays. The planning activities funded by this grant will lay the groundwork for the larger project by implementing necessary enhancements to DYNASIM, specifying criteria for evaluating policy reforms, and making the case for the need to reform retirement programs to eliminate work disincentives.

    To identify policy reforms that could reduce work disincentives at older ages and more equitably and efficiently provide retirement benefits to older adults

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $14,500
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2016

    To include the current and former NBER pre- and post-doc Aging Fellows in the group of participants at the October 6th and 7th, 2016 Working Longer Conference held at SIEPR

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    To include the current and former NBER pre- and post-doc Aging Fellows in the group of participants at the October 6th and 7th, 2016 Working Longer Conference held at SIEPR

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  • grantee: Brookings Institution
    amount: $400,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To measure how employers’ benefit costs change with age of employees

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Gary Burtless

    Funds from this grant support work by Gary Burtless to measure how employers’ benefit costs vary with age of employees. Burtless will use data from nationally representative microcensus files to obtain reliable estimates of the costs facing employers who hire or retain older workers rather than equally qualified younger workers who are paid the same wage. Cost differences to be examined include health insurance coverage for workers at different ages; compensation for scheduled and unscheduled leave, in particular for sickness; costs associated with the possibility that an older worker’s career will end sooner than that of an equally qualified younger worker; and retirement benefit costs, particularly under defined-benefit plans. Once calculated, these costs will be evaluated against a series of alternate policies that could reduce differences between older and younger workers.

    To measure how employers’ benefit costs change with age of employees

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $449,944
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2016

    To build on the momentum of the previous Age Smart Employer Awards to raise awareness of employers about the value of an age-diverse workforce and effective strategies to recruit, engage, and retain older workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Ruth Finkelstein

    This grant supports a third year of the Age Smart Employer Awards, an annual awards program that honors innovative New York City employers who have adopted effective strategies to recruit, engage, and retain older workers. Emerging research shows that older workers offer distinct advantages to employers. As a group, they are viewed by managers and human resource professionals as motivated, reliable, loyal, and superior in interpersonal communication skills compared to younger workers. Additional research suggests that workforces that are heterogeneous in terms of age are more creative than homogeneous ones. Additionally, because older workers mirror aging consumers, they relate to customers in a growing “silver economy.”  Yet, these advantages are often discounted or offset by employers’ concerns about the costs of employing older workers. The Age Smart Employer Awards aim to combat these concerns by honoring those employers who are successfully facilitating age-diverse workforces. Grant funds will support the administration of a third year of the awards; outreach and publicity efforts; the development of a new tool to help employers understand, identify, and articulate Age Smart practices and policies; expansion of the awards to three new localities; and efforts to expand the Awards’ institutional partners.

    To build on the momentum of the previous Age Smart Employer Awards to raise awareness of employers about the value of an age-diverse workforce and effective strategies to recruit, engage, and retain older workers

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