Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National Opinion Research Center
    amount: $987,258
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2014

    To increase the amount and quality of news coverage on the economics of working longer, by extending the AP-NORC Center's education, research, and public outreach for two additional cycles

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Trevor Tompson

    This grant provides two years of continued support for a partnership between National Opinion Research Center (NORC) and the Associated Press (AP) to marry NORC’s research expertise with AP’s media reach to create a vehicle for promoting public understanding of critical social issues. Funds from this grant will provide two years of salary support to a NORC-AP fellow who will cover the older work force beat, producing thoughtful, scientifically informed, high-quality articles on a variety of issues, including aging and work, retirement, flexible work arrangements for older workers, productivity, and the economic impact of an aging work force on businesses, pensions, and government programs like Social Security.  In addition, NORC will field a high-quality, nationally representative survey of older adults about issues facing older workers with the results distributed nationwide through the AP. Survey reporting will be supplemented with reporting on new economic research on the older work force and survey data will be made freely available to researchers in a public-use dataset.

    To increase the amount and quality of news coverage on the economics of working longer, by extending the AP-NORC Center's education, research, and public outreach for two additional cycles

    More
  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $498,556
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2014

    To inform decisions that affect the labor force activity, employment opportunities, and retirement security of older Americans, accounting for differences in socio-economic status

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alicia Munnell

    This grant to Alicia Munnell and her colleagues at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College supports research on the aging work force through the lens of workers’ socio-economic status (SES).  Munnell and her team will launch five integrated projects related to retirement, financial security, and employment opportunities that address the following questions.   How long do people need to work to achieve a financially secure retirement? How would retirement ages vary if they reflected differential mortality by socio-economic status? How does job-changing affect the ability to retire securely? How do job opportunities narrow with age? How much would reducing the price of older workers’ labor increase their attractiveness to employers? The project promises fill significant gaps in our understanding of the older work force.

    To inform decisions that affect the labor force activity, employment opportunities, and retirement security of older Americans, accounting for differences in socio-economic status

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $15,383
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2014

    To understand low and variable levels of female political representation in the United States

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Frances Rosenbluth

    To understand low and variable levels of female political representation in the United States

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $663,141
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2014

    To enhance and expand the scope of the Age Smart Employer Awards

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Ruth Finkelstein

    This grant provides continued support for the second year of the Age Smart Employer Awards, which honor local New York City employers who have demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to leveraging older workers’ talent while meeting the goals of both the business and its employees.   Grant funds will support the administration of the awards, the selection process, and outreach activities.  Particular emphasis will be placed on expanding the circle of businesses that know about and apply for the awards as well as increasing the visibility for winning employers and the innovative practices for which they are being honored.  Outreach strategy will particularly target small businesses (those employing fewer than 100 workers) and employers in New York City’s growing health care sector.

    To enhance and expand the scope of the Age Smart Employer Awards

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $862,416
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2014

    To foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity through a conference series and a post-doc/first sabbatical program

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator John Shoven

    This grant supports three, two-day, annual conferences exploring the latest economic research related to changing labor market institutions and regulatory policy in ways that accommodate the increasing lifespans of the American worker.   Hosted by economist John Shoven, director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR), the conferences will serve as an annual event where the growing community of new and established economists working on these issues can gather to network, share ideas, and learn about the latest research.  Topics to be discussed at the conferences will cover a wide range of issues, including retirement security, how existing regulatory regimes affect worker incentives, retirement strategies, pensions, the likely effects of proposed alternative regulatory regimes, and systematic differences between labor markets for older workers and those for younger cohorts.  Additional funds will support a small postdoc/first sabbatical fellowship program that will support the work of two researchers interested in conducting original, high-quality economic research in this area.

    To foster more research and policy discussion about changing labor market institutions to accommodate increased longevity through a conference series and a post-doc/first sabbatical program

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $307,604
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2014

    To identify the effect of public policies that promote extended employment on the health of older Americans

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Maria Fitzpatrick

    As the health of the U.S. population improves and the sources of retirement income become potentially more unstable, older Americans are expected to continue their current trend of both needing and wanting to work longer.  The health impacts of longer working lives, however, are inadequately understood, particularly when work is induced by policy changes such as increasing the age of full retirement for Social Security benefits. This grant supports research by Maria Fitzpatrick of Cornell University and Timothy Moore of George Washington University that examines this issue by studying the changes made in 1983 to the statutory retirement ages for Social Security benefits.  Combining administrative with data and detailed data on health behaviors and expenditures, Fitzpatrick and Moore will examine how and whether differences in the length of working lives change health outcomes such as mortality and morbidity.

    To identify the effect of public policies that promote extended employment on the health of older Americans

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  • grantee: North Carolina State University
    amount: $81,951
    city: Raleigh, NC
    year: 2013

    To better understand the research on how employees respond to individuals desiring to work longer

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    To better understand the research on how employees respond to individuals desiring to work longer

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  • grantee: University of Pennsylvania
    amount: $15,000
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2013

    To enable 25 graduate students and international scholars to attend the WFRN 2014 conference

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jerry Jacobs

    To enable 25 graduate students and international scholars to attend the WFRN 2014 conference

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $89,973
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2013

    To understand potential pathways between working longer and cognitive performance

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Laura Carstensen

    To understand potential pathways between working longer and cognitive performance

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  • grantee: American Council on Education
    amount: $737,318
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To deepen understanding within higher education as to how institutions can support senior faculty choosing to work longer, assist them in transitioning to an active next career phase, and promote culminating career legacies

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jean McLaughlin

    Funds from this grant support efforts by the American Council on Education (ACE) to understand and increase the impact of the Sloan Awards for Retirement Transitions, a series of awards given to 15 U.S. colleges and universities to honor and accelerate innovative, effective policies for successfully managing the culminating stages of faculty careers. First, ACE will monitor the progress of the 15 retirement award winners. They will collect campus reports as to how innovative practices and programs have been embedded in campus culture so that faculty members feel free to use them and are satisfied with the outcome. Second, from this group of 15 winners, ACE will select five to six institutions that are ready and committed to take their programs to the next level of institutional transformation. Three, ACE will identify three or four institutions that were initially interested in competing for the awards, but because of timing or other issues on their campuses, reluctantly chose not to compete. ACE will work closely with these schools to achieve the institutional changes necessary to support faculty in their final career stage as they are transitioning to retirement. Knowledge gained from these activities will be used to mount a deep and widespread communication effort within higher education to educate other institutions about effective ways that universities and colleges can change their campus cultures in order to support senior faculty choosing to work longer, assist them in transitioning to an active next career phase, and promote culminating career legacies.

    To deepen understanding within higher education as to how institutions can support senior faculty choosing to work longer, assist them in transitioning to an active next career phase, and promote culminating career legacies

    More