Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: ICPO-INTERPOL
    amount: $1,600,000
    city: Lyon, France
    year: 2011

    To provide partial support to develop INTERPOL's Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism Prevention Program

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Ronald Noble

    Funds from this grant provide partial support to INTERPOL to develop a Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism Prevention Program (RNTPP). Building on the success of their Biological Terrorism Prevention Program, INTERPOL 's work plan for developing the RNTPP will include organizing three terrorism prevention courses and one tabletop terrorism prevention exercise per year for three years, holding a international working group meeting to produce a report targeting the needs of police services in preventing nuclear and radiological terrorism, developing an investigative handbook, and designing and deploying five e-learning modules. Partnering with the International Atomic Energy Agency, INTERPOL will also develop a joint course aimed specifically at educating and training emergency personnel and other likely first responders to potential nuclear or radiological attacks.

    To provide partial support to develop INTERPOL's Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism Prevention Program

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  • grantee: Middlebury College
    amount: $149,155
    city: Middlebury, VT
    year: 2011

    To enable the Monterey Institute of International Studies expand the science-based courses offered in its Masters Degree in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Nuclear Nonproliferation
    • Investigator William Potter

    This grant funds an initiative at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at Middlebury College's Monterey Institute of International Studies to expand course offerings at CNS's unique master's program in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies, broadening and strengthening the scientific aspects of the curriculum. Using Sloan Foundation funding, CNS will add five additional science- and technology-based courses with at least 15 students each; offer two new weekend workshops annually on science- and technology-based themes with at least 25 students each; and continue its pre-enrollment, two-week, non-credit course in basic science and mathematics for new M.A. students.

    To enable the Monterey Institute of International Studies expand the science-based courses offered in its Masters Degree in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies

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  • grantee: Middlebury College
    amount: $149,063
    city: Middlebury, VT
    year: 2011

    To enable the Monterey Institute of International Studies to provide nonproliferation education and training for diplomats, government officials and mid-career professionals at international organizations

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Nuclear Nonproliferation
    • Investigator William Potter

    In fall 2010, the Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) of Middlebury College's Monterey Institute of International Studies was selected by the Austrian Foreign Ministry to manage a new Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation in Vienna, home-city of the International Atomic Energy Agency and, therefore, the global center for nuclear diplomacy. In September 2011, CNS ran a pilot one-week intensive course on nonproliferation at the new Center, aimed at providing nonproliferation education and training for diplomats, government officials, and mid-career professionals at international organizations. Funds from this grant will allow CNS to expand its offerings in Vienna either to one two-week course annually or, if diplomats cannot spare that much time for training, to two one-week courses. Each course would have at least 20 participants, at least 70% of whom would be from Non-Aligned countries. The rest would be diplomats from other countries or employees of international organizations, most of whom have excellent technical backgrounds but limited knowledge of the politics, institutions, and agreements that govern the international nuclear regime.

    To enable the Monterey Institute of International Studies to provide nonproliferation education and training for diplomats, government officials and mid-career professionals at international organizations

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  • grantee: Mongolian American Scientific Research Center
    amount: $7,500
    city: Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
    year: 2011

    To provide additional funding for a conference on fresh and spent fuel management and regional nuclear cooperation in North East Asia

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Dashdorj Dugersuren

    To provide additional funding for a conference on fresh and spent fuel management and regional nuclear cooperation in North East Asia

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  • grantee: Resources for the Future, Inc.
    amount: $1,171,667
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To inform and improve regulatory and legislative activities affecting shale gas development

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Shale Gas
    • Investigator Alan Krupnick

    Funds from this grant support a project by Resources for the Future (RFF) to assess the risks associated with increased shale gas development in the United States as viewed by both experts and the public. Primary focus will be on water scarcity and water, air, and soil quality issues associated with surface operations at well sites, vertical well drilling, horizontal drilling, deep hydraulic fracturing, and wastewater disposal. Expert views will be assembled from existing literature, recent government analyses, and interviews with selected experts. Public views will be determined by means of interviews with up to 100 people, four focus groups, and a survey of 1,500 randomly selected adults that will focus on public willingness to pay to reduce risks from shale gas development. Participants in the interviews, focus groups, and surveys will be drawn from residents in the western region of the United States, including Texas, where oil and gas production has a long history, and from the six-state eastern region of the Marcellus shale formation, where oil and gas production had not occurred for many years until recently and where shale gas production could be extensive in the near future. Subsequent to this research, RFF will identify, describe, and analyze the drivers of environmental risks associated with shale gas production and the policy levers potentially available to reduce these risks. RFF will describe and analyze current and prospective regulation and legislation at the national, river basin commission, and state levels, with some attention to the local level. Finally, RFF will put all of this together to develop recommendations for improvements in regulation and legislation.

    To inform and improve regulatory and legislative activities affecting shale gas development

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  • grantee: Arius Association
    amount: $150,000
    city: Baden, Switzerland
    year: 2011

    To support continued efforts to launch regional repository working groups

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Charles McCombie

    As countries around the world consider building their first nuclear power plant, they must inevitably consider the question of what will happen to the used or "spent" nuclear fuel that will come out of these reactors. An attractive option, especially for countries that are small or that will have only a small number of nuclear power plants, is to work cooperatively with other countries to create a regional spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste repository, thus sharing among a set of partner countries the high costs of such a facility. Since 2009, the Foundation has provided funds to the Arius Association to enable them to promote the regional repository approach in the Arabian Gulf-Middle East region and in South East Asia. Several countries in each of these regions are committed to launching nuclear power programs. Funds from this grant will provide support to Arias for the continuation of these efforts. During that time they will help plan and provide the intellectual backing for two regional meetings. The United Arab Emirates will host an Arabian Gulf-Middle East meeting; and the International Atomic Energy Agency will host a South East Asia meeting. By the end of the two-year grant period, Arius aims to facilitate the creation of multinational working groups considering the desirability and feasibility of creating regional repositories in each of these regions. Working with partner countries and the IAEA, Arius will draft the technical and legal documents needed to make this possible. They will also publish at least one article in a major international magazine that explains and publicizes their work on regional repositories and showcases their progress.

    To support continued efforts to launch regional repository working groups

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  • grantee: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
    amount: $19,800
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To fund the travel of American Participants in a conference on reprocessing in Northeast Asia to be hosted by the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Lora Saalman

    To fund the travel of American Participants in a conference on reprocessing in Northeast Asia to be hosted by the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $1,501,154
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2011

    To determine the capability of U.S. shale gas to contribute significantly to natural gas supply over the next twenty years, given various assumptions about natural gas prices

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Shale Gas
    • Investigator Scott Tinker

    Though new technology has recently led to a huge increase in the estimates of the amount of natural gas that can be produced economically from U.S. shale deposits, detailed objective analysis of how much gas can actually be produced from these deposits has not yet been done. This grant to the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) will support just such an analysis. BEG will obtain government and company data-some public and some proprietary-on all existing gas wells in the five major shale gas regions of the United States and use these data to perform a well-by-well analysis of production capacity. Although the BEG project will not cover all shale regions, the ones included are expected to yield the lion's share of shale gas over the next 20 years, the time horizon for the study. BEG will also quantify the needs for land and water use to enable various levels of shale gas production to be achieved.

    To determine the capability of U.S. shale gas to contribute significantly to natural gas supply over the next twenty years, given various assumptions about natural gas prices

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  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $15,000
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2011

    To provide travel support for attendees at a conference on macroeconomic theory and environmental issues

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator V. Smith

    To provide travel support for attendees at a conference on macroeconomic theory and environmental issues

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  • grantee: Smithsonian Institution
    amount: $60,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To conduct international dialogues, especially for the Americas, and related activities to explore the feasibility of an international academic network for measurement and monitoring of the world's forests

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Forests
    • Investigator Leonard Hirsch

    To conduct international dialogues, especially for the Americas, and related activities to explore the feasibility of an international academic network for measurement and monitoring of the world's forests

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