Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Cambridge
    amount: $149,130
    city: Cambridge, United Kingdom
    year: 2018

    To provide strategic vision and leadership of the Deep Carbon Observatory Synthesis Group for the 2019 program finale

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Marie Edmonds

    Funds from this grant provide 21 months of support for the continued operation of the Deep Carbon Observatory’s Synthesis Group 2019 (SG 2019). Led by University of Cambridge geologist Marie Edmonds, SG 2019 is tasked with overseeing and managing the synthesis of the intellectual output of the DCO, bringing together into a coherent whole the diverse observations, insights, models, and datasets generated over the past 10 years by hundreds of DCO scientists across the globe. Funded activities include the writing of a decadal report summarizing the DCO’s scientific and technical accomplishments; the planning and execution of several culminating events in 2019; the production of infographics, videos, and educational materials based on DCO insights; and the production of several synthesis papers for publication in high-value journals like Nature and American Mineralogist. Grant funds will provide administrative and travel support to Edmonds, allowing her to work closely and effectively with DCO leadership in the United States and around the world.

    To provide strategic vision and leadership of the Deep Carbon Observatory Synthesis Group for the 2019 program finale

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  • grantee: University of Rhode Island
    amount: $899,795
    city: Kingston, RI
    year: 2018

    To support Engagement: The Deep Carbon Observatory’s Road to 2019

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Robert Pockalny

    The core work of the Deep Carbon Observatory’s engagement team, headquartered at the University of Rhode Island (URI), consists of community building and management. The team writes the DCO’s newsletter, maintains a contact database of DCO-affiliated scientists, produces the DCO bibliography, handles educational and outreach partnerships with entities such as National Geographic and the Smithsonian, updates articles about the DCO and deep carbon science in Wikipedia, and conducts all media relations. As the DCO moves toward its planned conclusion in 2019, the engagement team will have additional responsibilities associated with the synthesis of DCO research and the effective communication of its import to the wider scientific community and the public. This grant continues operational support for the DCO’s engagement team for 21 months.

    To support Engagement: The Deep Carbon Observatory’s Road to 2019

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $750,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2018

    To lead the modeling and visualization activities of the Deep Carbon Observatory to achieve maximum contributions and legacies during the synthesis phase of the program

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Louise Kellogg

    One of the most far-reaching ambitions of the Deep Carbon Observatory is an omnibus modeling effort to integrate knowledge about the movements and transformations of carbon, an effort spanning the core, mantle, and crust over the four and a half billion years since Earth’s formation. The prospect is daunting, ranging from molecular processes to lava flows, to continent formation, from diamonds, to microbes, to billions of tons of sinking sediments, from temperatures conducive for life to those that melt iron, from pressures allowing delicate films to form to those that crush carbon into diamonds, and from momentary events to those so slow that in comparison the adjective “glacial” describes the blink of an eye. In addition, the temptation to model the evolution of the planet, including the emergence of life and the biosphere, proved irresistible.  Funds from this grant provide continued support to the Deep Carbon Observatory Modeling Forum in its efforts to provide an intellectual framework for the DCO’s modelers and to create key component models to speed and integrate their work. Over the next 21 months, the project team will continue its work developing open access platforms and tools for the modeling and visualization of deep carbon. Funded activities include software development, participation in the wider DCO’s synthesis activities, the holding of a workshop on modeling and visualization, and a series of “immersion” workshops designed to introduce DCO researchers to immersive model visualization.

    To lead the modeling and visualization activities of the Deep Carbon Observatory to achieve maximum contributions and legacies during the synthesis phase of the program

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  • grantee: George Washington University
    amount: $74,962
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To explore research areas in extreme biophysics, creation of new carbon-based materials, and implications for astrophysics and more extreme conditions not currently explored in the DCO

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Russell Hemley

    To explore research areas in extreme biophysics, creation of new carbon-based materials, and implications for astrophysics and more extreme conditions not currently explored in the DCO

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  • grantee: University of Sydney
    amount: $100,000
    city: Sydney, Australia
    year: 2017

    To modify models of the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years to incorporate visual knowledge of deep carbon cycle

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Sabin Zahirovic

    To modify models of the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years to incorporate visual knowledge of deep carbon cycle

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  • grantee: Marine Biological Laboratory
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Woods Hole, MA
    year: 2017

    To integrate and synthesize the activities of the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Mitchell Sogin

    Funds from this grant provide two years of operational and research support to the Deep Life Community of the Deep Carbon Observatory. Led by US microbiologist Mitch Sogin and German biogeochemist Kai Hinrichs, the Deep Life Community is a global collaborative network of some 250 researchers working together to enhance our understanding of the nature, distribution, abundance, and limits of the deep biosphere. Funds from this grant will allow the Deep Life Community to conclude its research as the Deep Carbon Observatory approaches its planned conclusion in 2019, as well as begin integrative work to synthesize the community’s findings with the work of the larger DCO community. Grant funds will support the completion of three major sampling studies: one in mainland Oman, one in the Atlantis Massif on the north Atlantic seafloor, and one in the Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan. Other funded research includes the completion of a “Census of Deep Life” that draws on deep life surveys of more than 90 locations worldwide. In addition, the Deep Life community continue laboratory studies of “extreme biophysics” that probe how biological molecules behave at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, the Deep Life Community will contribute several chapters to the technical volume that will summarize the entire body of DCO work and will contribute to the Deep Earth Carbon modeling initiative that provides integrative frameworks for the many faces of the DCO. The modeling has the exciting, maximal aim to predict the distribution of all deep life on Earth in space and time.

    To integrate and synthesize the activities of the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2017

    To lead and synthesize the activities of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Craig Manning

    Funds from this grant provide two years of operational and research support to the Extreme Physics and Chemistry Community of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO). The Extreme Physics and Chemistry community is a global network of researchers working together to better our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of carbon in the high temperature, high pressure environments characteristic of the deep Earth. Led by geophysicist Wendy Mao of Stanford and geologist Craig Manning of UCLA, the community is concerned with the 90% of Earth’s carbon that resides in the interior as solids, magmas and melts, and low density fluids. It addresses the transformations that occur both as carbon rises from the core to the mantle to the crust and also as surface carbon is subducted beneath the crust and subjected to extraordinary temperatures and pressures. Grant funds will support research and administrative costs of the Extreme Chemistry community as it moves towards the planned conclusion of the DCO in 2019, with the majority of funds supporting a network of postdoctoral research associates at 20 participating institutions. Other funds support workshops, “hackathons,” and computational simulation and modeling work associated with integrating insights from the community with discoveries by the larger DCO community.

    To lead and synthesize the activities of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: University College London
    amount: $70,000
    city: London, United Kingdom
    year: 2017

    To conduct a workshop and publish a special journal issue on catastrophic perturbations to Earth’s deep carbon

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Adrian Jones

    To conduct a workshop and publish a special journal issue on catastrophic perturbations to Earth’s deep carbon

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $45,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2017

    To support the inaugural Gordon Research Conference on deep carbon science as a legacy of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Craig Manning

    To support the inaugural Gordon Research Conference on deep carbon science as a legacy of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2017

    To complete and synthesize the work of the Deep Energy community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Edward Young

    The grant provides two years of support to Deep Energy (DE) community of the Deep Carbon Observatory. Representing 176 researchers in 32 nations, the group is about half from the United States and half from the rest of the world, the Deep Energy Community is the branch of the DCO that examines the abundance, distribution, and origins of deep Earth abiotic hydrocarbons and the reactions between energy and rock that produce energy. Grant funds will provide research support to the community as it completes a set of eight initiatives on reduced carbon formation, the fate of reduced carbon, confined hydrogen behavior, isotopic bond ordering of methane, ocean floor serpentinization, Precambrian cratons, analysis of sediment cores taken from a drilling site in Oman, and monitoring of subsurface microbial activity rates. The last project, joint with the Deep Carbon Observatory’s Deep Life community, aims to determine how rapidly changes in subsurface metabolic activity occur in response to seismic events. (In plain words, earthquakes might cause deep microbial blooms.) Along with completing these studies, the DE community would carry out a range of activities to synthesize and integrate the component activities, including through the DCO’s collective effort to create a system of models of deep Earth carbon.

    To complete and synthesize the work of the Deep Energy community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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