Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Rhode Island
    amount: $967,731
    city: Kingston, RI
    year: 2016

    To continue conducting engagement activities and to provide support for synthesis activities of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Robert Pockalny

    Funds from this grant continue support for the Engagement Team of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), which provides internal and external communications services to the international community of DCO geoscientists. Led by Sara Hickox at the University of Rhode Island, the Engagement Team provides content for the Deep Carbon Observatory website, publishes a newsletter and blog, compiles an up-to-date bibliography of DCO publications, maintains a contact database on the approximately 800 DCO researchers, oversees network-wide events, spearheads public engagement efforts, provides graphic design services for DCO researchers, and works to ensure smooth intra-DCO communication of goals, priorities, and achievements. Grant funds support the continuation of these activities for an additional two years. In addition, Hickox and the Engagement Team will provide support to the newly created Synthesis Group of the DCO, which focuses on synthesizing the diverse research accomplishments of DCO researchers in anticipation of the project’s contemplated end in 2019.

    To continue conducting engagement activities and to provide support for synthesis activities of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Johns Hopkins University
    amount: $99,955
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2015

    To build an International Deep Earth Water Group for the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Dimitri Sverjensky

    To build an International Deep Earth Water Group for the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Oregon State University
    amount: $119,444
    city: Corvallis, OR
    year: 2015

    To conduct the second field-based summer school of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Frederick Colwell

    To conduct the second field-based summer school of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Rockefeller University
    amount: $1,500,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To support Jesse Ausubel's continued leadership on behalf of the Sloan Foundation of the Deep Carbon Observatory program initiated in 2009

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Jesse Ausubel

    Funds from this grant continue support for Jesse H. Ausubel, Director of Rockefeller University’s Program for the Human Environment, in his role as the Sloan Foundation’s primary liaison to the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO).  As Sloan’s representative at the DCO, Ausubel serves as a member of the DCO leadership, elicits grant proposals in support of the DCO’s four research communities, oversees progress and reporting on the Foundation’s approximately 30 active DCO grants, represents the Foundation’s policies, priorities, concerns, and aspirations to the DCO leadership, and prepares periodic reports to the Foundation on the DCO’s progress towards its decadal goals.  Grant funds provide primary salary and administrative support for Ausubel and his team’s activities through the anticipated completion of the DCO in 2019, where his work will focus on managing important late-stage DCO projects related to modeling and visualization, intellectual synthesis of DCO discoveries, dissemination of DCO results, and crafting stable institutional and intellectual legacies for the program after Foundation support ends in 2019.  

    To support Jesse Ausubel's continued leadership on behalf of the Sloan Foundation of the Deep Carbon Observatory program initiated in 2009

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  • grantee: Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris
    amount: $300,150
    city: Paris, France
    year: 2015

    To create and lead “Task Force 2020” to consider possible futures for the Deep Carbon Observatory after its first decade

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Claude Jaupart

    Though the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) was conceived as a 10-year effort, a midterm external review of the collaborative’s achievements suggested that the DCO leadership explore the possibilities for continuing the collaboration after Sloan Foundation funding lapses in 2019. This grant supports the creation of a special task force to explore such options. Led by French geologist Claud Jaupert, the task force will outline practical requirements and consequences of post?2019 options for the Deep Carbon Observatory, exploring the ways in which the DCO might be continued, expanded, or wound down. It will scan the intellectual horizon for new research ventures; outline international cooperative programs that could build on the DCO community and expand its scientific reach; identify researchers and academic institutions that might participate in post?2019 activities; and search for institutions, funding bodies, and foundations that could provide financial support for post?2019 activities. It would carry out these activities through commissioned papers, visits with key stakeholders and institutions, and a trio of workshops, including special focus on the (now) younger scientists who will be in the prime of their careers during the decade of the 2020s. The effort represents a reasoned, prudent way to evaluate what to do, if anything, with the databases, websites, instruments, models, monitoring networks, and human capital created by the DCO’s first decade of discovery.

    To create and lead “Task Force 2020” to consider possible futures for the Deep Carbon Observatory after its first decade

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $700,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2015

    To form a Deep Carbon Modeling Forum and to stimulate creation of a system of linked models that represent and explore the dynamics of the deep carbon system as a whole

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Louise Kellogg

    Funds from this grant support an effort by Louise Kellogg of the University of California, Davis to lead a multidisciplinary group of Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) researchers in the development of the first stages of a Deep Carbon Earth Model that integrates existing geophysical knowledge with insights uncovered by the Deep Carbon Observatory. The project will involve representatives from each of the DCO’s four scientific communities—Reservoirs and Fluxes, Deep Energy, Deep Life, and Extreme Physics and Chemistry—as they come together to craft a series of interoperable modules that can be used to model the quantities, movements, origins, and forms of deep Earth carbon. Though a fully functional, predictive model is the ultimate goal, the project promises to provide several ancillary benefits to the larger DCO effort, including identifying gaps in existing knowledge, increasing communication between the DCO’s diverse communities, and establishing project-wide modeling protocols that can serve as the basis for both current and future modeling efforts.

    To form a Deep Carbon Modeling Forum and to stimulate creation of a system of linked models that represent and explore the dynamics of the deep carbon system as a whole

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2015

    To continue to lead and coordinate the activities of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Craig Manning

    The Extreme Physics and Chemistry (EPC) community of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is an international collaboration of geologists and geophysicists who have come together to transform our understanding of the unique physical and chemical properties of the 90 percent of Earth’s carbon estimated to reside in the planet’s high-pressure, high-temperature interior. EPC researchers study the diverse variety of forms deep carbon takes—solids, magmas, melts, low-density fluids—and examine the physical and chemical transformations carbon undergoes as it rises from the core to the surface and falls from the surface to the core. This grant provides two years of continued core support for the EPC as it moves toward completion of its ambitious research agenda.

    To continue to lead and coordinate the activities of the Extreme Physics and Chemistry community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Marine Biological Laboratory
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Woods Hole, MA
    year: 2015

    To continue to lead and coordinate the activities of the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Mitchell Sogin

    The Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is an international collaboration of researchers who have come together to identify and quantify interactions between deep life and deep Earth carbon, to transform our understanding of the processes that define the diversity and distribution of deep life, and to determine the environmental limits of deep life. This grant provides two years of support to the Deep Life community as it continues its research agenda. Over the next two years the community plans to launch five major field expeditions; conduct genomic?based studies of the diversity and function of deep life; measure and estimate presently unknown quantities like the magnitude of deep Earth biomass and the number of deep Earth endospores; and explore the molecular basis of microbial adaptation to extreme deep subsurface conditions. In addition, Deep Life community scientists will contribute to a DCO-wide modeling and visualization initiative and strengthen the field through the coordination of workshops, community meetings, and fellowships.

    To continue to lead and coordinate the activities of the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    amount: $100,395
    city: Troy, NY
    year: 2015

    To accelerate biophysical research in the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory with a workshop and related development of a microscopy chamber capable of withstanding high pressure

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Catherine Royer

    To accelerate biophysical research in the Deep Life community of the Deep Carbon Observatory with a workshop and related development of a microscopy chamber capable of withstanding high pressure

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $1,250,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2015

    To continue the activities of the Deep Energy community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Edward Young

    This grant provides two years of continued support to the Deep Energy community of the Deep Carbon Observatory. Researchers working in the Deep Energy community investigate the abiotic methane and hydrogen in the deep recesses of Earth. These compounds, when oxidized, release energy into the rocks around them, feed microbial life, and possibly contribute to humanity’s store of energy resources. Recent discoveries, many of them by DCO researchers, suggest that such deep energy reserves are significantly more plentiful than science has imagined. Over the next two years, Deep Energy researchers will use both field-based investigations in oceanic and continental settings and lab experiments on fluid-rock interactions to shed light on a number of important scientific questions, including how to differentiate between abiotic and biotic hydrocarbons; the role of serpentinization and other hydrogen-generating reactions in the production of deep energy; how deep energy reactions mediate the form, quantities, distribution, and mobility of abiotic carbon and hydrogen; and the relationship between deep energy and deep microbial life. In addition, the Deep Energy team will begin collaborative work with other DCO communities to bring together insights from numerous disciplines in geoscience to create a functional four-dimensional Deep Carbon in Earth Model.

    To continue the activities of the Deep Energy community of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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