Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Wikimedia Foundation
    amount: $3,015,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2016

    To transform Wikipedia Commons' media files from free text into machine-readable, structured data, enabling new uses for millions of media files on Wikipedia and across the web

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Katherine Maher

    Wikimedia Commons is the world's largest repository of freely licensed educational media, with 34 million photo, video, and audio files, and is growing by some five million files a year—faster than Wikipedia itself—as people submit photos and image-rich institutions their collections. Unfortunately, most of those files are not accessible either to Wikipedia text searches or to the rest of the internet because they lack good metadata. To address the lack of metadata, the Wikimedia Foundation has launched the Structured Data on Commons Project, an ambitious attempt to create infrastructure and tools that will transform all the media files on Wikimedia Commons into an accessible form—known as structured, linked data—that is machine readable and will enable easy search of the Commons by Wikipedia readers and contributors; by educational, cultural, and scientific organizations; and by anyone with access to the web. Once cleaned and integrated, the structured data for each file can be understood by machines and linked to other content on the wider internet. The structured data can also be instantly available in any language, answering a huge need for the 289 languages that comprise Wikipedia and facilitating greater interoperability among language communities. Structured data will also allow developers both within and outside Wikipedia to create software tools to help with use and reuse of these files. It will help contributors more effectively illustrate Wikipedia content and it will enable readers to more quickly and easily find the right media and share it. It will also allow for more partnerships with content providers and provide incentives for these providers to structure their media when releasing it to the public.

    To transform Wikipedia Commons' media files from free text into machine-readable, structured data, enabling new uses for millions of media files on Wikipedia and across the web

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  • grantee: Digital Public Library of America, Inc.
    amount: $1,497,674
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2016

    To leverage DPLA's national network for the creation of a free eBook collection available in 50 states and a pilot eBook marketplace for thousands of libraries and schools

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Daniel Cohen

    Funds from this grant support a two-pronged initiative by the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) to significantly expand access to eBooks for thousands of libraries and schools across the country. First, DPLA plans to improve the curation and distribution of open eBook content by creating a new DPLA eBook collection, which it will make available to 16,000 libraries across the country. Working with authors, publishers, and both corporate and nonprofit partners, the DPLA collection will include at least 3,000 popular fiction and nonfiction titles, textbooks, and educational resources, all formatted in the highly flexible EPUB format. Second, the DPLA will pilot a new spin-off entity, which will use market-based methods to increase the availability and reduce the price of eBooks from publishers and potentially generate revenue for DPLA and its library partners. Building on work done with the New York Public Library, the DPLA will explore different revenue models for a nationwide marketplace for buying eBooks, with licensing restrictions, that aims to enable low-cost bulk purchases of eBooks for statewide virtual libraries, promising to significantly expand access to eBooks to millions across the country.

    To leverage DPLA's national network for the creation of a free eBook collection available in 50 states and a pilot eBook marketplace for thousands of libraries and schools

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  • grantee: Annual Reviews
    amount: $800,000
    city: Palo Alto, CA
    year: 2016

    To publish a digital magazine that unlocks scientific research to inform the public discourse in multiple subjects with compelling, timely, and impartial knowledge

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Richard Gallagher

    Annual Reviews is a nonpro?t publisher of a prestigious series of multi?author reviews in 46 discipline?speci?c ?elds in natural and social science. From analytic chemistry to economics to virology, these reviews are considered authoritative syntheses of scienti?c developments in each ?eld as determined by 600 leading scientists and academics. Funds from this grant provide partial support for the launch of a digital magazine that would utilize its treasure trove of research to inform the public discourse. This new, web?based magazine will use essays, interviews, videos, podcasts, infographics, and animations to engage a broad audience and will feature the latest scienti?c research on a wide range of subjects, highlighting the real?world signi?cance of scienti?c research and demonstrating how it can illuminate subjects that might otherwise appear opaque, confusing, or controversial. Beyond the research community, the magazine is aimed at non–research professionals, the media, educators and students, policy specialists, patients and patient advocates, and the general public. The magazine would produce five to ten substantive text and multimedia items per week, plus one long video per month and weekly short videos. All items will be supported by two to three AR reviews freely available for a speci?ed period, allowing readers a deep dive into popular social issues. In addition, all magazine content will be free to read and with appropriate attribution to republish online and in print, signi?cantly increasing its value for research, education, and innovation and multiplying the readership, especially on social media.

    To publish a digital magazine that unlocks scientific research to inform the public discourse in multiple subjects with compelling, timely, and impartial knowledge

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  • grantee: Digital Public Library of America, Inc.
    amount: $1,901,709
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    Support for the Digital Public Library of America to complete its Nationwide Service Hub Network and to pilot an eBooks distribution program

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Daniel Cohen

    This grant supports the Digital Public Library of America to expand its nationwide service hub network. Service hubs are on-ramps in each state for uploading and sharing digital content from the smallest private collection in a remote rural library to the largest state library or museum. As such, they are the key to DPLA's grass-roots, bottom-up, decentralized approach to building a national digital library. Hubs host locally provided digital content for the DPLA, correct and add metadata to uploaded items, coordinate local events and public outreach, and collaborate with state cultural institutions on digital initiatives. Grant funds will allow the DPLA to add eight new service hubs to its current roster of 15, increasing coverage by 50 percent and moving the institution closer to its goal of being a truly national digital library. Funds from this grant also support a DPLA initiative to partner with authors, publishers, libraries, and the White House to launch a new service network that provides free eBooks to children.

    Support for the Digital Public Library of America to complete its Nationwide Service Hub Network and to pilot an eBooks distribution program

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  • grantee: Digital Public Library of America, Inc.
    amount: $124,919
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2015

    To help the DPLA launch a new nationwide service bringing together libraries and publishers to provide children with free ebooks

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Daniel Cohen

    To help the DPLA launch a new nationwide service bringing together libraries and publishers to provide children with free ebooks

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  • grantee: New York Botanical Garden
    amount: $1,155,244
    city: Bronx, NY
    year: 2014

    As support for the New York Botanical Garden to digitize 20,000 plant species records and to become a major Content Hub for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), while co-heading World Flora Online, the first complete online scientific resource for all Earth's 350,000 plant species

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator WIlliam Thomas

    Though plants have enormous value for society in terms of food, medicine, the environment, and economics, and hold significant social and cultural value, no single site provides accurate, comprehensive, and open access data on the known species of flowering plants.  This grant to the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) supports its efforts become one of four lead international institutions spearheading the creation of World Flora Online (WFO), the first open access, online resource for accurate and comprehensive information for all of Earth's 350,000 known plant species.  NYBG will also become one of a dozen major content hubs for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), making available not only its first 20,000 plant species records and all 85,000 records when completed, but also depositing over a million existing plant specimen records in DPLA's index, a 15 percent increase in DPLA's current holdings.

    As support for the New York Botanical Garden to digitize 20,000 plant species records and to become a major Content Hub for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), while co-heading World Flora Online, the first complete online scientific resource for all Earth's 350,000 plant species

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  • grantee: Wikimedia Foundation
    amount: $3,000,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2014

    As a final grant to bolster Wikipedia’s readership and editors, including more women, expand its mobile presence, and strengthen its technical infrastructure as it moves to self-sustainability

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Lisa Gruwell

    This grant to the Wikimedia Foundation provides continued administrative and operational support for Wikipedia, the fifth largest website in the world and the largest encyclopedia in history.  Over the next five years, grant funds will be used in a series of projects to bolster Wikipedia’s technical infrastructure, improve editor engagement, increase the number of women editors, increase the number of contributions via mobile devices, better integrate multimedia offerings such as video, audio, and photography into Wikipedia pages, and help Wikipedia improve and monitor article quality while moving toward self-sustainability.

    As a final grant to bolster Wikipedia’s readership and editors, including more women, expand its mobile presence, and strengthen its technical infrastructure as it moves to self-sustainability

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  • grantee: New York Public Library
    amount: $60,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To support a summer teachers fellowship program at the New York Public Library to define best practices for how NYPL resources and other digital collections could be used and to share that information with the DPLA for the benefit of broader audiences

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Maggie Jacobs

    To support a summer teachers fellowship program at the New York Public Library to define best practices for how NYPL resources and other digital collections could be used and to share that information with the DPLA for the benefit of broader audiences

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $384,565
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2013

    For a third year of funding to continue to develop solutions to copyright law obstacles faced by digital library initiatives such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Pamela Samuelson

    Funds from this grant provide one year of continued support to efforts by a team led by Pamela Samuelson at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law to examine the legal obstacles posed by copyright law to digital library initiatives and the digital storage and dissemination of in-copyright works. The Berkeley team will examine a diverse range of issues, including orphan works, library and archive copyright exceptions, private ordering solutions, collective licensing for certain copyrighted works, digital lending of in-copyright works, and metadata ownership and use issues. Samuelson’s team will also provide advice and counsel to the Digital Public Library of America on legal issues related its mission and will serve as a locus for informed legal discussion of copyright issues in the digital age.

    For a third year of funding to continue to develop solutions to copyright law obstacles faced by digital library initiatives such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

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  • grantee: Digital Public Library of America, Inc.
    amount: $1,200,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2012

    To launch Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as an independent, national organization and to support its executive director and two key staff to begin operations and scale up for the first two years

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Daniel Cohen

    This grant provides two years of continued support for the development, launch, and operation of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Scheduled to launch in April 2013, the DPLA aims to create an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that will make the nation's scientific and cultural heritage universally accessible to the public. Funds from this grant support the continued development of the DPLA platform architecture and interface, community-building efforts and technical support to expand and strengthen the growing network of content providers, and administrative funds for the hiring of an executive director and two full time staff members.

    To launch Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) as an independent, national organization and to support its executive director and two key staff to begin operations and scale up for the first two years

    More