Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $120,000
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2016

    To examine "Abundance, Aerosolization, and Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens in the Built Environment"

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Yun Shen

    To examine "Abundance, Aerosolization, and Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens in the Built Environment"

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $69,975
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2016

    To support a MoBE workshop in Singapore to foster relationships with MoBE researchers in East Asia

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jordan Peccia

    To support a MoBE workshop in Singapore to foster relationships with MoBE researchers in East Asia

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  • grantee: Ohio State University
    amount: $19,987
    city: Columbus, OH
    year: 2016

    To support the Microbiology of the Built Environment Symposium at the National Council for Science and the Environment 2017 Conference and Global Forum

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Karen Dannemiller

    To support the Microbiology of the Built Environment Symposium at the National Council for Science and the Environment 2017 Conference and Global Forum

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $516,490
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2016

    To conduct a longitudinal analysis of the microbiomes of dormitories and their inhabitants at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA)

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Christopher Lowry

    This grant provides partial support for a longitudinal study of the microbiomes of dormitories and their inhabitants at the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA). Over the course of nine weeks, a University of Colorado research team led by principal investigator Christopher Lowry and Lt. Col. Andrew Hoisington will sample indoor and outdoor surfaces at USAFA dormitories, characterize environmental conditions, and take skin and stool samples from a cohort of 48 U.S. Air Force cadets. Samples will then be analyzed to determine the degree to which the dorm room locations of cadets and their interactions with each other influence the microbial profiles of the cadets and their dorm rooms. The uniformity of the dorm room construction and the unique standardization in diet, lifestyle, and age among cadets makes them a particularly attractive target for study that will maximize researchers’ ability to detect confounding factors that impact host-derived microbial colonization of the dormitories. The team plans to share its findings through conference presentations, open access peer-reviewed publications, social media, and websites. The team also plans a symposium to share findings and discuss how current and future research directions in human and built environment microbiomes might advance the aims of the Department of Defense.

    To conduct a longitudinal analysis of the microbiomes of dormitories and their inhabitants at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA)

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $748,629
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2016

    To expand understanding of the microbial ecology of the built environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Thomas Bruns

    This grant supports two additional years of research by a team at the Berkeley Indoor Microbial Research Consortium, which aims to expand our understanding of the microbial ecology of the built environment as mediated by interactions among organisms, particulate matter, and volatile and nonvolatile chemicals. Under the direction of principal investigator (PI) Thomas Bruns, professor of plant and microbial ecology at the University of California, Berkeley, the proposed work plan is organized around four objectives: Build an integrated understanding of the role of occupancy and occupant behaviors on bioaerosols and microbially derived chemical emissions in residential environments. The biological measurements will be made in collaboration with the Berkeley Chemistry of Indoor Environments (CIE) team (see Berkeley CIE proposal) as part of the intensive field campaign taking place in one-to-two residences. Characterize the chemistry of biological interactions among microorganisms on residential indoor surfaces, incorporating both mVOC measurements and the study of nonvolatile chemical compounds, as measured through nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (NanoDESI MS). Determine the metabolic state and activity of indoor microbes. Develop improved methods for sampling and assaying microbial communities in built environments. Research findings will be shared through peer-reviewed publications, presentations at conferences and meetings, and through blogs on microBE.net. At least three postdoctoral fellows will be trained in the course of the project.

    To expand understanding of the microbial ecology of the built environment

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  • grantee: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    amount: $250,000
    city: Blacksburg, VA
    year: 2016

    To examine how warm ambient water temperatures and recycled water influence the building plumbing microbiome

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Amy Pruden

    Drinking water regulations focus on the quality of the water coming out of the water treatment plant, but water can pick up bacteria and other microbes as it travels from the plant to the faucet.  Since 2012, the Foundation has supported researchers at Virginia Tech to characterize the plumbing microbiome and how it affects the microbial profile of household water. This two-year grant continues Foundation support for this work.  Professors Amy Pruden and Marc Edwards at Virginia Tech have designed a series of experiments to explore how warm (30°C) ambient water temperatures and use of recycled water influence the building plumbing microbiome. Over the next two years, they will use complementary batch and continuous flow experiments to study how water temperature affects abundance and diversity among bacteria and amoebae in household water and whether recycled water’s distinct chemistry (relative to potable water) causes greater proliferation of bacteria and free-living amoebae in bulk water and biofilms. The Virginia Tech team will share their findings through peer-reviewed papers and presentations at national and international conferences and through blog posts and other social media. The sequence data will be deposited in public databases. At least one student and two postdoctoral fellows will be trained under the grant.

    To examine how warm ambient water temperatures and recycled water influence the building plumbing microbiome

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $750,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2016

    To provide renewed support to examine the microbiology of the neonatal intensive care unit environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jillian Banfield

    With Foundation support, a team led by Jillian Banfield at the University of California, Berkeley has been investigating how preterm infants, taken from their mothers at birth and placed in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), nonetheless acquire the microbes that will become their human microbiome. Initial findings suggest microbes from the “sterile” NICU itself colonize the infants. This grant supports the continuation of Banfield’s work for an additional three years. Banfield hypothesizes that certain forms of microbial life can survive in NICU environments for months or years, travel from room to room by riding on nurses’ clothing, and eventually become incorporated into infant gut, oral, or skin microbiomes. To test these hypotheses, Banfield and her team will track three rooms and their occupants in the NICU of the Magee-Women’s Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA over two years. Using advanced metagenomic techniques, the team will identify persistent, room‐adapted strains of microbes living in the NICU, identify which of these strains successfully colonize infant patients, and quantify the transfer of microbes via bioaerosols and travel vectors such as nurses’ uniforms. The team will share their findings through journal publications, presentations at national and international conferences, and through blogs on microBE.net.

    To provide renewed support to examine the microbiology of the neonatal intensive care unit environment

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, Baltimore
    amount: $20,000
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2016

    To conduct planning activities for the MoBE 2017 meeting

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Lynn Schriml

    To conduct planning activities for the MoBE 2017 meeting

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  • grantee: Emory University
    amount: $124,617
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2016

    To support a national workshop on the microbiology of legionella in the built environment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Ruth Berkelman

    To support a national workshop on the microbiology of legionella in the built environment

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $125,000
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2016

    To examine how disinfectants may promote antibiotic resistance through horizontal gene transfer

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Ilana Brito

    To examine how disinfectants may promote antibiotic resistance through horizontal gene transfer

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