Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $119,611
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2015

    To develop methods to optimize recovery of RNA from indoor microbiome samples

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Gary Andersen

    To develop methods to optimize recovery of RNA from indoor microbiome samples

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  • grantee: The University of Chicago
    amount: $881,666
    city: Chicago, IL
    year: 2015

    To develop new knowledge about the metabolism of indoor microbial communities using experimental and modeling approaches

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Jack Gilbert

    Recent field investigations of the microbiology of the built environment have demonstrated that the biological composition of indoor air and building surfaces is vastly more complex than previously thought. Very little is known, however, about the fundamental ecology of the microbes that colonize these locations. This grant supports efforts by a research team led by Jack Gilbert, associate professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago, to develop new knowledge about the metabolism of indoor microbial communities using experimental and modeling approaches. The team plans to examine how different building surface materials, under variable temperature and humidity conditions, influence microbial growth, evolution, and survival and will develop a mechanistic model that can predict the succession and metabolism of microbial communities on surfaces. Dr. Gilbert and his team will seed tile, laminate, wood, and metal surfaces with defined microbial consortia acquired from human skin, dog fur, and soil, and observe microbial community succession under various temperature and humidity conditions. Their observations will test a number of important hypotheses, including how humidity affects the diversity of metabolically active bacteria and fungi, whether taxonomic diversity of active microbes decreases over time, how air temperature affects cell grow rates, and how the bacteria-to-phage ratio in a given microbial community affects overall community size.   If successful, the project will result in new knowledge about bacterial succession in the built environment and provide a mechanistic model to improve understanding of the metabolic activities of indoor microbes. The team plans to share their findings through publications in peer-reviewed journals, presentations at meetings and conferences, and through the use of social and traditional media. At least two postdoctoral fellows and two graduate students will be trained.

    To develop new knowledge about the metabolism of indoor microbial communities using experimental and modeling approaches

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $326,700
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2015

    To develop improved software tools for studying the microbiology of the built environment that integrate sequence data, metabolic data, and building science data

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Robin Knight

    Researchers identify indoor microbes based on sequence data, i.e., analysis of DNA that is isolated from samples taken indoors. Though DNA sequencing has led to the discovery of a vast array of new indoor microbes, important gaps in our knowledge remain. We have an increasingly detailed picture of which microbes thrive indoors, but we don’t know what those microbes are doing. Enter mass spectronomy, an analytical chemistry technique that identifies the types and amounts of chemicals in a sample based on molecular weight. By using mass spectronomy to analyze indoor samples for chemicals produced by microbial metabolism, researchers can peer into the actual workings of indoor microbial communities. This grant funds a project by microbiologist Rob Knight of the University of Colorado and Pieter Dorrestein, professor of pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, to expand the capabilities of two popular software platforms, QIIME and GNPS, to enable each to integrate sequence data, metabolic data, and building science measurements and permit researchers to easily perform DNA analysis and chemical data analysis on the same samples. The expanded systems will allow scholars to examine related microbial and metabolic processes directly in samples from the built environment, and in some cases to reanalyze samples already collected.

    To develop improved software tools for studying the microbiology of the built environment that integrate sequence data, metabolic data, and building science data

    More
  • grantee: Weill Cornell Medical College
    amount: $119,830
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2015

    To support an international consortium of researchers studying the metagenomics of subways and mass transit systems

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Christopher Mason

    To support an international consortium of researchers studying the metagenomics of subways and mass transit systems

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  • grantee: University of Cincinnati
    amount: $110,000
    city: Cincinnati, OH
    year: 2015

    To support scientific exchange with research groups in Finland and neighboring countries

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Tiina Reponen

    To support scientific exchange with research groups in Finland and neighboring countries

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $35,612
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2015

    To disseminate key results from the Sloan Microbiology of the Built Environment Program at Healthy Buildings 2015 America

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Shelly Miller

    To disseminate key results from the Sloan Microbiology of the Built Environment Program at Healthy Buildings 2015 America

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  • grantee: International Society for Indoor Air Quality and Climate
    amount: $70,000
    city: Santa Cruz, CA
    year: 2014

    To support the Sloan Symposium at Healthy Buildings 2015 Europe

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Hal Levin

    To support the Sloan Symposium at Healthy Buildings 2015 Europe

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $120,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2014

    To examine the role of the built environment as a venue for microbial cross inoculation between infants

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Zachery Lewis

    To examine the role of the built environment as a venue for microbial cross inoculation between infants

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $120,000
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2014

    To examine the regulation of the microbial community structures in drinking water, from source to tap

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Sarah Haig

    To examine the regulation of the microbial community structures in drinking water, from source to tap

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  • grantee: The Forsyth Institute
    amount: $120,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2014

    To examine the microbiomes of indoor track facilities and the runners who train indoors versus outdoors

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Brian Klein

    To examine the microbiomes of indoor track facilities and the runners who train indoors versus outdoors

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