Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: North Carolina State University
    amount: $249,957
    city: Raleigh, NC
    year: 2019

    To study the effects of an aging labor force on firms’ decision to modify employment conditions and compensation programs

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    To study the effects of an aging labor force on firms’ decision to modify employment conditions and compensation programs

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  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $299,148
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2019

    To evaluate older workers’ value to employers and to inform policymakers as to any potential hurdles to working longer that retirees will face

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alicia Munnell

    Many older Americans are both healthy enough to work past conventional retirement age and want or need to stay in the labor market. But do employers need and want older workers? This grant to the Center on Retirement Research (CRR) at Boston College aims to produce an enhanced understanding of the extent to which employers are ready and willing to hire and retain older workers. The CRR initiative will involve four separate, but integrated research projects. First, the CRR team will survey a large sample of employers to acquire their perceptions of the productivity and costs of their older workers relative to their younger ones. Second, they will analyze a large proprietary dataset provided by RetirementJobs.com, a nationally recognized job site for workers over the age of 50, and analyze the sorts of jobs being offered to workers on the site. Third, they will use multiple data sources to construct an index that ranks occupations by how easy it is for older workers to stay working or be hired into that occupation. Fourth, they will use data from the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Survey (LEHD), the Census Business Register (CBR), and the Longitudinal Business Register (LBR) to compare quantitative measures of worker value—the actual productivity (revenue per worker) and profitability (revenue divided by wages)—at firms based on the age distribution of their employees.

    To evaluate older workers’ value to employers and to inform policymakers as to any potential hurdles to working longer that retirees will face

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  • grantee: Urban Institute
    amount: $573,819
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To provide federal and state policymakers with the necessary information to inform sound policies that eliminate work disincentives at older ages, facilitate paid employment for older adults, and improve older adults’ financial security

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Richard Johnson

    This grant supports a project by the Urban Institute, in partnership with the American Enterprise Institute, to harness the rich research findings from the Foundation’s Working Longer program to stimulate a meaningful, nonpartisan, fact-based policy discussion on older workers and retirement security. Urban Institute will not make specific policy recommendations, but instead will use Foundation-supported research to identify challenges and impediments to working past conventional retirement age and discuss how various policy reforms might both facilitate work at older ages and improve retirement income security. Supported activities include conducting a systemic review of findings of Sloan-supported articles, reports, and books on working longer; writing a synthesis report describing the policy implications of those findings; holding an expert roundtable to assess the merits of various reform options; conducting original policy analyses of the likely impacts of promising but understudied policy options that might facilitate work at older ages; producing and disseminating briefs, blog posts, and fact sheets that highlight the most promising reform proposals; and holding a series of public forums to engage federal and state policymakers.

    To provide federal and state policymakers with the necessary information to inform sound policies that eliminate work disincentives at older ages, facilitate paid employment for older adults, and improve older adults’ financial security

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $197,008
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2019

    To support research on the effects of a range of institutional policies and programs in higher education on faculty retirement decisions

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Frank Dobbin

    To support research on the effects of a range of institutional policies and programs in higher education on faculty retirement decisions

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  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $155,958
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2019

    To build upon previously Sloan-funded research on age discrimination, by studying the effects of ageist stereotypes in job ads on the age composition of job applicants for those jobs

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator David Neumark

    To build upon previously Sloan-funded research on age discrimination, by studying the effects of ageist stereotypes in job ads on the age composition of job applicants for those jobs

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  • grantee: Greater Washington Educational Telecommunications Association Inc.
    amount: $200,000
    city: Arlington, VA
    year: 2019

    To produce a nine-part series covering the challenges faced by older workers who want or need to stay on the job and by prospective employers

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lee Koromvokis

    To produce a nine-part series covering the challenges faced by older workers who want or need to stay on the job and by prospective employers

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $599,160
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2019

    To construct, field, and analyze a new survey to collect information about employers’ incentives and willingness to consider alternate work conditions for aging workers

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jeffrey Wenger

    While some evidence exists about the types of job conditions that could encourage older workers to remain in the labor force, it is unknown whether and the extent to which those conditions are or could be available in the labor market. Surveys of older workers, for instance, regularly report high demand for workplace flexibility—specifically hours flexibility—as well as other conditions. Yet, employee preferences for job conditions like these are only half of the labor market equation. Substantially less research has been done on the employer side of the equation to understand firm-level incentives and capabilities. This grant funds a project by Jeffrey Wenger and David Powell at the RAND Corporation, in collaboration with a team at the Indeed Hiring Lab that will survey human resource (HR) professionals, hiring managers, and employers to collect information about firms’ working conditions, the variation in those working conditions across workers in the same firm, and the varying on-the-job amenities from which workers can select. In addition to collecting and analyzing these data, the team will construct a set of vignettes that display the tradeoffs between job conditions and wages that firms are capable of and willing to make. This project will produce some of the first evidence about firm-level behavior regarding the willingness of employers to accommodate older workers with specific work conditions.

    To construct, field, and analyze a new survey to collect information about employers’ incentives and willingness to consider alternate work conditions for aging workers

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  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $450,048
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2018

    To strengthen Network member engagement of the Sloan Research Network and successfully transition to a new structure and leadership

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jacquelyn James

    The Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work (SRNAW) is the only multidisciplinary research network focused on the aging of the workforce in the United States and abroad. Bringing together 235 members from 21 countries and more than 24 disciplines including economics, psychology, sociology, and management studies, SRNAW is a critical communication hub for the development of shared theories, frameworks, and research projects on aging and work. Funds from this grant support continued operation of the network along with activities designed to increase and strengthen member engagement in SRNAW. Additional grant funds support the development of plans for sustainable long-term financing of the network.

    To strengthen Network member engagement of the Sloan Research Network and successfully transition to a new structure and leadership

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $219,875
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2018

    To shed new light on the prevalence and nature of independent contracting (including gig work), with a focus on documenting how both pre- and post-retirement older workers combine independent contracting with other sources of income

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Annette Bernhardt

    This grant funds a project led by Annette Bernhardt and Jesse Rothstein at the University of California, Berkeley to study the incidence and characteristics of independent contracting using tax return data for California from 2013 to 2017. The study will focus, in particular, on how both pre- and postretirement older workers combine independent contracting with other sources of income. Analyzing both W-2s and 1099s, Bernhardt and her team will look closely at persons with both types of incomes, permitting an assessment of whether independent contracting is the main or supplemental work activity. The richness of the dataset will also allow preliminary analysis of trends and patterns into and out of independent contracting work over time and correlations between independent contracting and race, gender, ethnicity, and age. The linked dataset created will also provide a significant resource to the state of California, to other states wanting to broaden data sources on independent contractors, and to researchers who can apply to use the datasets in their own work.

    To shed new light on the prevalence and nature of independent contracting (including gig work), with a focus on documenting how both pre- and post-retirement older workers combine independent contracting with other sources of income

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $561,331
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To develop a better and more cohesive understanding of current and future trends in aging and labor force participation in the United States and to impart that information to the general public

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lisa Berkman

    Changes in health, family, and work may make working longer difficult if not risky for substantial sections of the future U.S. population. This grant supports a community of scholars to produce 12 papers involving original research that will introduce a new framework for understanding current and future trends in working longer. The resulting volume—published either as a book or in a high-impact special journal issue—will examine multiple contexts that shape Americans’ likelihood of working longer, with emphasis on two cross-cutting themes of change across cohorts and heterogeneity across population subgroups, which have not been sufficiently studied to date. Under the leadership of Lisa Berkman of Harvard, this project will bring together a multidisciplinary group of distinguished scholars and invite them to collaborate with promising junior scholars, inviting the next generation of researchers to critically examine conventional thinking in this area. Grant funds will support three meetings so that authors can integrate objectives, gain important feedback from each other, and present their results in a policy-relevant setting. The project’s goals are threefold: to publish original research that brings critical, new perspectives to the scholarship on working longer; to build a new, intergenerational community of scholars who will set the agenda for future research; and to disseminate high-impact findings that have the potential to influence policymakers and public discourse.

    To develop a better and more cohesive understanding of current and future trends in aging and labor force participation in the United States and to impart that information to the general public

    More