Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: College of William and Mary
    amount: $50,000
    city: Williamsburg, VA
    year: 2018

    To develop the indoor surface extractor/collector

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Rachel O'Brien

    To develop the indoor surface extractor/collector

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  • grantee: National Press Foundation
    amount: $5,540
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To demonstrate how HOMEChem activities can be translated for a lay audience via journalism

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Sandy Johnson

    To demonstrate how HOMEChem activities can be translated for a lay audience via journalism

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $74,996
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To support HOMEChem documentation as a basis for education and outreach activities

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz

    To support HOMEChem documentation as a basis for education and outreach activities

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  • grantee: University of York
    amount: $254,546
    city: York, United Kingdom
    year: 2018

    To develop an open source model for investigating indoor gas-phase chemistry and expand science communications about indoor chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Nicola Carslaw

    Modeling is essential to the development of indoor chemistry as a field. Comprehensive, integrated physical-chemical models that include a realistic representation of how buildings influence indoor processes are needed to assess gaps in our understanding, to improve experimental design, to generate hypotheses for investigation, to guide measurements, and to indicate key species to quantify and the detection limits required for quantification. The MOdelling Consortium for Chemistry of Indoor Environments (MOCCIE) consists of six teams of investigators with expertise and models in six different areas: kinetic process modeling, gas-phase chemistry modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, modeling of indoor secondary organic aerosols and organic aerosols, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and modeling surface interactions and the role of clothing and textiles. MOCCIE has determined that the best way to ensure reproducible indoor chemical science would be to strive to construct a fully integrated open source model. This requires converting each of the six existing MOCCIE models into an open source format. Funds from this grant would support a project to convert Nicola Carslaw’s gas phase chemistry model into a fully open source platform using the Python programming language. Additional funds support the construction of a new user-friendly interface to facilitate the model’s use and production of supporting documentation.   In addition to the modeling work, Carslaw will work to expand science communications about indoor chemistry by engaging a U.K.-based freelance science journalist, Nina Notman. Notman will attend indoor chemistry events and conferences, and give a plenary on science communication at the 2018 Indoor Air Conference.

    To develop an open source model for investigating indoor gas-phase chemistry and expand science communications about indoor chemistry

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  • grantee: University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $70,043
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2018

    To examine ozone reactions with four common indoor materials

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Richard Corsi

    To examine ozone reactions with four common indoor materials

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $24,269
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2018

    To support a workshop on indoor surface chemistry

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Andrew Ault

    To support a workshop on indoor surface chemistry

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $125,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2018

    To provide partial support for an instrument to improve detection of volatile organic compounds

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Joost de Gouw

    To provide partial support for an instrument to improve detection of volatile organic compounds

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  • grantee: Drexel University
    amount: $84,797
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2017

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and Microbiology of the Built Environment program at Indoor Air 2018

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Michael Waring

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and Microbiology of the Built Environment program at Indoor Air 2018

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $1,251,611
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2017

    To initiate the development of community building and data infrastructure for the CIE program through HOMEChem, an interdisciplinary collaborative field experiment

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Marina Vance

    This grant funds a project led by Assistant Professor Marina Vance of the University of Colorado, Boulder, in collaboration with Associate Professor Delphine Farmer of Colorado State University to initiate the development of a data infrastructure for the field of indoor chemistry through an interdisciplinary collaborative field experiment named “House Observations of Microbial and Environmental Chemistry” (HOMEChem). The HOMEChem experiment will take place at a test house at the University of Texas at Austin in the summer of 2018, where researchers from 9 universities will aim to identify the most important factors controlling chemistry in indoor environments. Teams from each of these nine universities will make a wide range of measurements of the test house, including building and ventilation metrics; environmental parameters; spectral radiance and photolysis rates; aerosol concentrations and size distributions; aerosol composition; and the presence or absence of elemental and oxidized carbon, gas and particle phase organics, nitrogen oxides, ozone, nitrous acid, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane. Many of these factors will be the subject of multiple measurements by more than one instrument, allowing comparison of instruments and collection methodologies. In addition, Vance and Farmer will conduct controlled experiments regarding cooking and cleaning, so see how these common household activities affect the chemistry that takes place inside the house. The HOMEChem experiment promises not only to result in new knowledge about indoor chemistry, but to surface important issues regarding shared data and metadata needs among indoor chemists and to build community as the various research teams work together to execute the experiment and interpret their joint findings. Research results will be shared through at least eight publications and twenty presentations at high-profile sessions and plenaries at national and international meetings.

    To initiate the development of community building and data infrastructure for the CIE program through HOMEChem, an interdisciplinary collaborative field experiment

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  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $1,000,000
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2017

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Manabu Shiraiwa

    Funds from this grant support efforts by Manabu Shiraiwa, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with Nicola Carslaw at the University of York, to develop and lead an indoor chemistry modeling consortium. This two-year project will bring together experts from several different fields to begin to develop a model that realistically represents how buildings influence indoor chemical processes. The team will begin to find ways to link six different modeling techniques that deal with different aspects of indoor chemistry on scales ranging from micro- to macroscale and from very short (less than 1 second) to much longer lifetimes. The modeling consortium plans to address the following research questions: (1) Can we understand indoor chemistry well enough to predict it quantitatively with computer models of chemical and physical processes? (2) What are the major uncertainties that currently exist in these models? (3) What experiments/field measurements do we need to improve our models? (4) What experiments/field measurements do we need to evaluate our models? Models will be developed within the framework of exploring two relevant and highly topical research themes for indoor air chemistry: (1) reactions between indoor oxidants and human skin and (2) cleaning-related emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The research team will also conduct three workshops—at the beginning, middle, and end of the project—to foster collaboration and communication as well as to provide in-person opportunities to review work plans and progress. Six early-career researchers will be trained. The new knowledge and modeling tools will be shared in peer-reviewed publications as well as through presentations at conferences, such as Indoor Air 2018 and the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) meeting.

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

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