Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: College of William and Mary
    amount: $29,220
    city: Williamsburg, VA
    year: 2019

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments and Microbiology of the Built Environment programs at the 2019 American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) meeting

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Rachel O'Brien

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments and Microbiology of the Built Environment programs at the 2019 American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) meeting

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $25,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To support a planning meeting for a consensus study on the environmental health implications of emerging indoor chemistry research

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Marilee Shelton-Davenport

    To support a planning meeting for a consensus study on the environmental health implications of emerging indoor chemistry research

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  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $375,000
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2019

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces using advanced spectroscopy

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Franz Geiger

    This grant funds research by surface chemist Franz Geiger, Dow Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University, that will investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces. Using advanced spectroscopy, Geiger plans to expand our understanding of how indoor volatile and semivolatile organic compounds absorb from air to surfaces; how submonolayer amounts of these absorbed organic compounds convert into indoor molecular, nano-, and microlayers; the propensity of these newly formed layers to interact with oxidants; and how the dynamic response of molecular, nano-, and microlayers to gas-phase species vary with changes in relative humidity. The approach includes both mechanistic studies of idealized model surfaces as well as work on surfaces of samples derived from real-world indoor environments. Results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings.

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces using advanced spectroscopy

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  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $789,771
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2019

    To provide renewed support to the indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Manabu Shiraiwa

    The Modeling Consortium for the Chemistry of Indoor Environments (MOCCIE) is a multi-institutional collaboration devoted to developing comprehensive, integrated, physical-chemical models that simulate how occupants, indoor activities, and buildings influence indoor chemical processes. Founded with Sloan support in 2017, and overseen by Manabu Shiraiwa, Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, and Nicola Carslaw, Reader, University of York, MOCCIE links and modifies existing chemical models across a diverse range of physical scales and timeframes. The consortium also partners with experimental chemists working on the indoor environment in mutually beneficial ways. Experimental data can be used to test MOCCIE simulations, resulting in better predictions. These improved predictions, in turn, can then be used by experimentalists to generate hypotheses for further testing. Funds from this grant provide 18 months of continued support for MOCCIE. Over that time, MOCCIE will assess gaps in the fundamental understanding of indoor chemistry processes, guide experimental measurements through identification of parameters responsible for model uncertainties, indicate key species with predicted concentrations, improve design of experimental/fieldwork studies, and aid in interpretation of data from laboratory and field experiments.

    To provide renewed support to the indoor chemistry modeling consortium

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  • grantee: Drexel University
    amount: $468,436
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2019

    To examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Michael Waring

    This grant funds research by Michael S. Waring, Associate Professor of Architectural and Environmental Engineering and Peter DeCarlo, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry at Drexel University, that will examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Waring and DeCarlo’s work will focus on aerosol and gas-phase transformations, exploring how aerosol processing, composition, and component-based filtration are influenced by extreme and abrupt changes in temperature, relative humidity, and aerosol concentration as air is thermally conditioned and filtered. Utilizing a controllable HVAC system in a Drexel office building, Waring and DeCarlo will make seasonal measurements of the chemical composition of aerosols and trace gases at four locations in the HVAC system—outdoor, mixed, supply, and return air—to isolate the impact of HVAC system aerosol and gas composition. Aerosol composition will be measured using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer with other instruments capturing trace concentrations of CO, CO2, H2O, O3, NO, NO2. Grant funds also support Waring and DeCarlo’s continued analysis of data collected during 2018’s Sloan-funded HOMEChem field project.

    To examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system

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  • grantee: California Institute of Technology
    amount: $499,424
    city: Pasadena, CA
    year: 2019

    To examine the role of autoxidation in indoor environments

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Paul Wennberg

    This grant supports a collaboration between Paul Wennberg, R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, and Henrik Kjaergaard, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen, to examine the role of autoxidation (a series of unimolecular processes that rapidly yield oxidized compounds) in indoor environments. Kjaergaard will use computational chemistry methods to diagnose the autoxidation pathways and estimate the rate coefficients for the organic peroxy radical chemistry initiated by the reactions of ozone and the hydroxyl radical with chemicals typically found indoors, especially a suite of terpenes. Complementing this approach, Wennberg will study terpene chemistry in the laboratory to evaluate the computational work and provide guidance for how to extend the calculations to more organic substrates. The pair will publish a suite of mechanistic schemes that describe the chemistry in peer-reviewed manuscripts, present their findings at conferences and meetings, and integrate their work into existing indoor chemical models.

    To examine the role of autoxidation in indoor environments

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $198,325
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2019

    To coordinate efforts to integrate surface chemistry data by establishing the SURFace Consortium for Chemistry of Indoor Environments (SURF-CIE)

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Vicki Grassian

    To coordinate efforts to integrate surface chemistry data by establishing the SURFace Consortium for Chemistry of Indoor Environments (SURF-CIE)

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  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $41,150
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2019

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and the Microbiology of the Built Environment program

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Erica Hartmann

    To disseminate key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and the Microbiology of the Built Environment program

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  • grantee: American Association for the Advancement of Science
    amount: $85,296
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To support a one-day symposium on the Chemistry of Indoor Environments

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Annette Olson

    To support a one-day symposium on the Chemistry of Indoor Environments

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $900,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To provide renewed support to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources and fates of organic chemicals indoors

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Allen Goldstein

    This grant supports research by atmospheric chemist Allen Goldstein and environmental engineer William Nazaroff to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources, and fates of organic chemicals indoors. The work will focus on the roles of human occupants, emissions from the building and its contents, and the intrusion of outdoor pollutants as agents influencing indoor air chemistry. In a series of experiments, Goldstein and Nazaroff will characterize organic compound composition of the air in residential spaces, cataloging the relative abundance of volatile (VOC), intermediate volatile (IVOC), and semivolatile (SVOC) organic compounds in both the gas and particle phases, and to compare this composition with outdoor air. They will then analyze how organic compound composition changes across various dimensions: by time, by location inside the residence, and by human occupancy. Their methods will enable them to apportion indoor air organics into major source categories: building fabric and contents, occupants and activities, and outdoor air, with the ultimate objective of understanding the role of emissions influencing indoor air chemistry. This work will advance the state of knowledge regarding the contributions of humans, human activities, surface interactions, and oxidation processes influencing indoor air composition in residences. This new knowledge will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least three students will be trained.

    To provide renewed support to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources and fates of organic chemicals indoors

    More
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