Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $1,000,000
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2017

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Manabu Shiraiwa

    Funds from this grant support efforts by Manabu Shiraiwa, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with Nicola Carslaw at the University of York, to develop and lead an indoor chemistry modeling consortium. This two-year project will bring together experts from several different fields to begin to develop a model that realistically represents how buildings influence indoor chemical processes. The team will begin to find ways to link six different modeling techniques that deal with different aspects of indoor chemistry on scales ranging from micro- to macroscale and from very short (less than 1 second) to much longer lifetimes. The modeling consortium plans to address the following research questions: (1) Can we understand indoor chemistry well enough to predict it quantitatively with computer models of chemical and physical processes? (2) What are the major uncertainties that currently exist in these models? (3) What experiments/field measurements do we need to improve our models? (4) What experiments/field measurements do we need to evaluate our models? Models will be developed within the framework of exploring two relevant and highly topical research themes for indoor air chemistry: (1) reactions between indoor oxidants and human skin and (2) cleaning-related emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The research team will also conduct three workshops—at the beginning, middle, and end of the project—to foster collaboration and communication as well as to provide in-person opportunities to review work plans and progress. Six early-career researchers will be trained. The new knowledge and modeling tools will be shared in peer-reviewed publications as well as through presentations at conferences, such as Indoor Air 2018 and the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) meeting.

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

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  • grantee: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    amount: $750,000
    city: Chapel Hill, NC
    year: 2017

    To examine the roles of dampness, water soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Barbara Turpin

    This grant, to Barbara Turpin, professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will fund three-year effort to examine the roles of dampness, water-soluble organic gases (WSOGs), and surface chemistry on indoor air composition. The project is designed to improve characterization of indoor WSOGs, their chemistry and fate indoors, and to provide key information needed to predict the degree to which water in damp homes may alter indoor air composition. The research will address the following questions by conducting controlled experiments with real indoor surfaces at high vs. low relative humidity: What is the uptake rate and equilibrium partitioning of WSOGs on typical indoor surfaces? How much liquid water absorbs on these surfaces and how does liquid water mediate uptake? The research will also provide insights into surface chemistry and product formation in damp homes by measuring real-time chemical changes on indoor surfaces after the introduction of key gases (ozone, water vapor, and WSOGs) using sophisticated state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques. Finally, the UNC team will pilot real-time molecular-level characterization of WSOGs in one to three homes using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) over 15 days. The project will create new knowledge about the roles of dampness, water-soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition. The research findings will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences.

    To examine the roles of dampness, water soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $736,035
    city: Toronto, ON, Canada
    year: 2017

    To investigate the role of photochemistry indoors

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator D. James Donaldson

    This grant funds a research project by atmospheric photochemist D. James Donaldson, professor at the University of Toronto, and Christian George, a senior scientist at France’s National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Lyon, France to investigate the role of photochemistry indoors. The team plans to establish whether heterogeneous (gas/surface) photochemical reactions occur indoors, producing gas phase oxidants and their precursors, as well as particles. The team plans to address three main questions: (1) Are indoor surfaces of occupied spaces photochemically active in the formation of gas phase oxidants? (2) If so, how do local variables (temperature, relative humidity, specifics of illumination) affect the formation of gas phase oxidants? (3) Is heterogeneous photochemistry a source of indoor particulate matter? These questions will be addressed through a series of laboratory and chamber experiments in both laboratories in Toronto, Canada, and Lyon, France. To facilitate the long-distance collaboration, the team will conduct a series of two-way student exchanges, as well as annual meetings between the principal investigators in Toronto and Lyon. This exchange of students will encourage and support strong international scientific ties at all levels, allowing students to experience different societies and laboratory structures, and better preparing them for transnational activities in the future. This project promises to provide new knowledge about indoor photochemistry. The results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least three undergraduate students, three graduate students, and two postdoctoral fellows will be trained.

    To investigate the role of photochemistry indoors

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $749,760
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2017

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Vicki Grassian

    This grant supports efforts by Vicki Grassian, Distinguished Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of California, San Diego, to monitor the chemistry that occurs on indoor surfaces. Grassian and her team will compare surface adsorption and surface reactions (kinetics, extent of reaction) over a range of different types of material surfaces found in homes, offices, and public spaces, including glass (windows), titanium dioxide (paints and self-cleaning surfaces), concrete, and drywall. She will conduct these experiments on model systems to better understand the chemistry of these materials, as well as on surfaces coated with thin films to determine if they behave differently. Gases of interest include ozone, nicotine, cyclomethylsiloxanes (components of personal care products), ammonia, and co-mixtures of these. In addition, Grassian will conduct a series of controlled experiments that vary the relative humidity, temperature, and light surfaces are exposed to, and measure how chemical reaction mechanisms and reaction kinetics vary across cases. An important aspect of this research is to understand how these factors drive the chemistry of indoor surfaces with gases present in indoor environments. They plan to probe the molecular processes that occur on these indoor surfaces using molecular-based probes such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, and scanning probe techniques such as atomic force microscopy. This project will characterize many of the physical and chemical transformations taking place on indoor surfaces and generate new data for indoor chemistry models. This proposal will provide a molecular-level understanding of chemistry on indoor surfaces as affected by important factors such as organic coatings, light, and relative humidity. The results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least two students and one postdoc will be trained.

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces

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  • grantee: Gordon Research Conferences
    amount: $20,000
    city: West Kingston, RI
    year: 2017

    To provide partial support for the 2017 Atmospheric Chemistry Gordon Research Conference

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Kimberly Prather

    To provide partial support for the 2017 Atmospheric Chemistry Gordon Research Conference

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  • grantee: Memorial University of Newfoundland
    amount: $49,800
    city: St. John's, NL, Canada
    year: 2017

    To share the key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and the Microbiology of the Built Environment program

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Cora Young

    To share the key results from the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program and the Microbiology of the Built Environment program

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $50,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2016

    To support planning activities to guide community building, education and outreach activities for the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Marina Vance

    To support planning activities to guide community building, education and outreach activities for the Chemistry of Indoor Environments program

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  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $750,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2016

    To expand understanding of chemical sources, sinks, and transformations taking place indoors

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Paul Ziemann

    Funds from this grant support work by atmospheric chemist Paul Ziemann to expand our understanding of chemical sources, sinks, and transformations of indoor environments, and to develop physical-chemical mechanisms to describe these processes. Ziemann will conduct a series of pilot studies to examine a range of indoor environments. His studies will aim to (1) identify similarities and differences in the organic chemical composition of indoor gases, particles, and surfaces; (2) determine organic chemical contributions from various sources; (3) determine the effects of organic gases, oxidants, acids, humidity, light, and temperature on gas, particle, and surface composition; (4) determine potential effects of organic compounds emitted by humans, either directly or as a result of reactions; and (5) develop physical-chemical mechanisms to explain observed compositions and processes. The range of indoor environments to be tested includes an art museum, classrooms, offices, a student athletic center, student dining facilities, and local residences. This project will provide new insights into the physical and chemical processes that determine the composition of indoor air and allow for development of a deeper understanding of how different indoor environments function. The results also promise to be valuable for developing models for predicting the chemical composition of indoor air and strategies for improving indoor air quality. The results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least two students and one postdoctoral fellow will be trained.

    To expand understanding of chemical sources, sinks, and transformations taking place indoors

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  • grantee: Colorado State University Foundation
    amount: $54,044
    city: Fort Collins, CO
    year: 2016

    To support an indoor chemistry data needs workshop

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Delphine Farmer

    To support an indoor chemistry data needs workshop

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  • grantee: Missouri University of Science and Technology
    amount: $55,553
    city: Rolla, MO
    year: 2016

    To support an indoor chemistry modeling workshop

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Joel Burken

    To support an indoor chemistry modeling workshop

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