Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: American Association for the Advancement of Science
    amount: $500,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To provide institutions of higher education with the information they need to continue enhancing diversity efforts in ways that are mission-aligned and legally sustainable

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Shirley Malcom

    The Handbook on Diversity and the Law: Navigating a Complex Landscape to Foster Greater Faculty and Student Diversity in Higher Education is a comprehensive handbook for college and university administrators that provides practical, actionable guidance on how to design effective, legally compliant programs that advance diversity. Originally produced in 2010 with the help of a Sloan Foundation grant, the Handbook needs an update that reflects the myriad changes to the legal landscape since its publication. This grant to the American Association for the Advancement of Science provides funding for that purpose.   The Handbook on Diversity and the Law Edition 2 will add descriptions and analyses of recent court and agency decisions and changes to federal policy; provide new suggestions for process management, governance, structural barrier removal, and communications; and operationalize these resources through new user-friendly tools and training materials.

    To provide institutions of higher education with the information they need to continue enhancing diversity efforts in ways that are mission-aligned and legally sustainable

    More
  • grantee: Barnard College
    amount: $350,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To shape and implement a program to build undergraduate science and math pipelines to engineering degrees at the master’s level, aimed particularly at women and underrepresented minority students

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Linda Bell

    This grant funds a joint effort by Barnard College and Columbia University’s School of Engineering to prepare undergraduate women to succeed in an accelerated M.S. degree program in engineering. Selected students will complete a four-year undergraduate major at Barnard coupled with a one-year master’s degree at Columbia Engineering, for a “4+1” program. Students from racial and ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in engineering will be a special target for recruitment into the program, particularly those from low-income families. Four cohorts of eight students each will receive support across their junior and senior years at Barnard and their master’s year at Columbia. Barnard and Columbia Engineering will build a comprehensive structure of support for students in the program, including direct faculty advising, well-delineated paths for academic courses beginning in the junior year, career counseling, cohort-level support, and financial aid to encourage participation and success. All students will be guaranteed support for summer research experiences for two years, research-based cohort activities, and intensive faculty advising. Nine diverse scholastic pathways have been identified through the program to date, including mapping a major in chemistry to an M.S. in chemical engineering, and opportunities for math, statistics, economics, computer science, or physics majors to earn one of five M.S. degrees in the Columbia Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research.

    To shape and implement a program to build undergraduate science and math pipelines to engineering degrees at the master’s level, aimed particularly at women and underrepresented minority students

    More
  • grantee: Southern Regional Education Board
    amount: $1,408,919
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2019

    To support the Institute on Teaching and Mentoring as part of the national effort to increase doctoral degrees awarded to members of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields, with a special focus on preparation for careers in higher education

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Ansley Abraham

    The Institute on Teaching and Mentoring is an annual 3.5-day professional development conference for underrepresented minority doctoral students and recent Ph.D. recipients. Organized by the Southern Regional Education Board, the Institute is the single largest gathering in the country of underrepresented scholars pursuing advanced degrees. It presents an unrivaled opportunity for building community with and among such scholars and for addressing their specific educational and professional needs. The Institute also plays a central role in the Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. program. More than 150 scholars supported through the Sloan University Centers of Exemplary Mentoring attend each year. Attendees hear plenary speakers talk on substantive issues in graduate education and may choose from a large variety of workshops addressing topics across every stage of the educational pipeline, from the challenges of adapting to graduate study as a first-year student, to dissertation guidance, to making informed choices about the job market. The Institute also offers programming designed to build community among attendees, forge professional connections, celebrate the achievements of scholars, and introduce attendees to professional mentors and recruiters.  Funds from this grant provide partial support for the Institute for a period of four years.

    To support the Institute on Teaching and Mentoring as part of the national effort to increase doctoral degrees awarded to members of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields, with a special focus on preparation for careers in higher education

    More
  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $65,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To broadly disseminate to various stakeholders the new National Academies report, "MINORITY SERVING INSTITUTIONS: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce"

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Leigh Jackson

    To broadly disseminate to various stakeholders the new National Academies report, "MINORITY SERVING INSTITUTIONS: America's Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce"

    More
  • grantee: American Association for the Advancement of Science
    amount: $112,800
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To provide infrastructure funding to update legal guidance for colleges and universities on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in STEM and to assist with the pilot phase of SEA Change, a voluntary, metrics-based self-assessment system

    • Program Higher Education
    • Initiative Professional Advancement of Underrepresented Groups
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Shirley Malcom

    To provide infrastructure funding to update legal guidance for colleges and universities on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in STEM and to assist with the pilot phase of SEA Change, a voluntary, metrics-based self-assessment system

    More
  • grantee: Georgia State University Research Foundation
    amount: $125,000
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2018

    To develop programming establishing the CASA Science Fellows Program, a STEM PhD Pipeline for Georgia State University students

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Kyle Frantz

    To develop programming establishing the CASA Science Fellows Program, a STEM PhD Pipeline for Georgia State University students

    More
  • grantee: Association of American Universities
    amount: $301,550
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To construct more student-centered educational environments for all graduate students by active institutional and departmental support for a variety of career options and for increased inclusion of students from underrepresented groups

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Tobin Smith

    Funds from this grant support a multidimensional national effort by the Association of American Universities (AAU) to help make U.S. graduate education more student-centered. The need for such an effort stems from a recognition that the organization of much of graduate education has been too focused on the singular goal of research productivity at the expense of preparing doctoral students for a broader array of professional careers inside and outside the academy. AAU will run a pilot program at 8 universities drawn from its 62 highly respected member institutions. Over the course of three years, two departments from each university will conduct analyses to support the development and implementation of action plans to provide greater support for students’ pursuits of diverse Ph.D. career pathways The project will also increase transparency by making Ph.D. and career outcomes data readily available, and foster cross-institutional learning and broad dissemination of effective strategies and practices through workshops, virtual webinars, and activities aimed at fostering more student-centered educational environments for all doctoral students.

    To construct more student-centered educational environments for all graduate students by active institutional and departmental support for a variety of career options and for increased inclusion of students from underrepresented groups

    More
  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $1,061,264
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2018

    To establish a collaboration of 11 large R-1 universities that will accelerate and enhance efforts to improve foundational courses in STEM through learning analytics research into, and development of, equitable and inclusive STEM curricula and teaching practices

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Timothy McKay

    A recent study of undergraduates across five Big Ten research universities found that women in large classes in biology, chemistry, physics, accounting, and economics performed about a third of a grade point lower (e.g. A- to B+) than similarly situated men. Understanding the basis for this gendered performance difference has the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the poorer persistence patterns of women and other demographic groups in STEM, and to the development of means by which those differences can be eliminated. This grant funds an effort by University of Michigan physicist Timothy A. McKay to assemble a broad coalition of university collaborators to jointly undertake further research and interventions. The acronym for the project is SEISMIC, for the Sloan Equity and Inclusion in STEM Introductory Courses project, appropriately reflecting the opportunity for powerful disruption of an entrenched system. SEISMIC will bring together 11 institutions, each contributing a team of approximately 10 faculty members, students, and staff. The teams will examine all introductory STEM courses on all campuses through current analytics and engage in parallel data analysis, data sharing, coordinated experiments, a continuous exchange of speakers (about 60 per year), and extended annual summer meetings. Attention will be paid to the diversity of institutions chosen. Gender will continue to be an object of study, and the project will also examine other student demographics including race/ethnicity, first-generation (first-gen) college students, and various forms of intersectionality, e.g., Latina women or first-gen men. A planning meeting and three annual collaboration summer meetings will be held to accelerate research, build community, and enhance the spread of ideas. Results will be disseminated broadly through presentations at national professional meetings and publication in several peer-reviewed articles that will reach broad STEM and STEM-education audiences.

    To establish a collaboration of 11 large R-1 universities that will accelerate and enhance efforts to improve foundational courses in STEM through learning analytics research into, and development of, equitable and inclusive STEM curricula and teaching practices

    More
  • grantee: Northeastern University
    amount: $247,641
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2018

    To support an intensive, year-long academic leadership program for 40-50 mid-career STEM faculty of color from a consortium of seven Boston-area universities

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Debra Franko

    This grant provides two years of support for a new multi-institutional leadership development program for mid-career STEM faculty of color in the Boston area. Participating universities include Northeastern University, Boston University, the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Suffolk University, Tufts University, and the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Successful applicants to the program will attend an initial, four-day workshop that focuses on self-assessment, skills building, and creation of a networked cohort. The workshop will be followed with individualized mentoring by seven institutional leaders about governance and successfully navigating the institutional structure of a university. Finally, participants will develop team projects that they will execute, evaluate, and then present to a group of provosts and deans. All program participants will be tracked for two-years after completion of the program to gauge its effects.

    To support an intensive, year-long academic leadership program for 40-50 mid-career STEM faculty of color from a consortium of seven Boston-area universities

    More
  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $122,846
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2018

    To integrate engineering principles and thought into the Masters of Public Policy/Masters of Public Administration programs to enhance the effectiveness of public and nonprofit managers

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Donald Siegel

    To integrate engineering principles and thought into the Masters of Public Policy/Masters of Public Administration programs to enhance the effectiveness of public and nonprofit managers

    More