Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: FORCE11
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Diego, CA
    year: 2018

    To partially support the 2018 Future of Research Communication and eScholarship meeting

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Cameron Neylon

    To partially support the 2018 Future of Research Communication and eScholarship meeting

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  • grantee: University of Pittsburgh
    amount: $582,852
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2018

    To develop software and services for transforming mathematical results as they appear in journal article abstracts into formally structured data that machines can read, process, search, check, compute with, and learn from as logical statements

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Thomas Hales

    Computers do nothing but process logical statements. Mathematics consists of nothing but such statements. It would be reasonable to assume, then, that computers would be adept, perhaps uniquely, at reading, understanding, and cataloging the academic literature of mathematics. Not yet. People and machines, it turns out, speak different mathematical languages. If computers are to help manage mathematical knowledge, they need to be taught how to read math papers. The grant funds efforts by mathematician Thomas Hales to begin that instruction. Hales has raised an international army of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, which he plans to unleash on the abstracts of thousands of mathematical papers. They will carefully translate the definitions and results that appear in these abstracts into formal programming language. These formalized abstracts—“fabstracts,” for short—can then be used to train machine learning algorithms to “read” textual mathematics.   

    To develop software and services for transforming mathematical results as they appear in journal article abstracts into formally structured data that machines can read, process, search, check, compute with, and learn from as logical statements

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $741,681
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2018

    To accelerate scientific discovery by using statistical machine learning to enable advanced search of mathematical literature

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator John Lafferty

    To accelerate scientific discovery by using statistical machine learning to enable advanced search of mathematical literature

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  • grantee: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    amount: $67,100
    city: Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    year: 2018

    To support a Banbury meeting on signals of trust within scholarly communication

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Rebecca Leshan

    To support a Banbury meeting on signals of trust within scholarly communication

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  • grantee: Yale University
    amount: $1,000,000
    city: New Haven, CT
    year: 2017

    To expand emulation and software preservation infrastructure in order to ensure that software and software-dependent digital content is accessible by future generations

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Euan Cochrane

    Yale University Library digital archivist Euan Cochrane leads one of the most ambitious software archiving programs in United States research libraries. Currently accessible to Yale faculty and students, the Yale software collection relies on open source software called bwFLA that enables the creation, management, and distribution of “virtual machines” which can simulate the hardware of an older computer on a newer computer and then run older software on the simulated machine. In practice this means that if you have the right credentials, you can go to the Yale Library website, click a link, and suddenly be running Windows 3.1, the original MacOS, or any other operating system and software, right in your browser. This grant supports efforts by Cochrane and his team at Yale to further develop this infrastructure and, working with the Software Preservation Network, to cultivate this capability at other institutions. The grant will support focused work on four use cases: scientific software, CD-ROM archiving, restricted-access reading rooms, and a “Universal Virtual Interactor” that would automatically launch the correct software and version to open any given digital file. Other supported activities include technical refinements to the bwFLA platform and the archiving of the National Software Reference Library currently held by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.

    To expand emulation and software preservation infrastructure in order to ensure that software and software-dependent digital content is accessible by future generations

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  • grantee: Ithaka Harbors Inc
    amount: $20,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2017

    To support the pilot convening of the William G. Bowen Colloquium

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Catharine Hill

    To support the pilot convening of the William G. Bowen Colloquium

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  • grantee: University of Oxford
    amount: $65,000
    city: Oxford, United Kingdom
    year: 2017

    To streamline the publication workflow for data papers

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Neil Jefferies

    To streamline the publication workflow for data papers

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  • grantee: Rochester Institute of Technology
    amount: $470,458
    city: Rochester, NY
    year: 2017

    To develop a mathematically-aware search engine for popular use by both students and experts

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Richard Zanibbi

    A “math aware” search engine is exactly what it sounds like, a search engine that speaks and understands the language of mathematics. It would be able to locate not only words on pages, but to identify and recognize mathematical symbols, expressions, equations, formulas, and theorems. This is harder than it sounds, since common mathematical symbols can take on special meanings depending on the context in which they appear. This grant funds work by computer scientists Richard Zanibbi and Lee Giles to create an easy to use, fully math aware search engine. Zanibbi and Giles plan to develop state-of-the-art methods for extracting, indexing and retrieving math in documents; develop algorithms for the recognition of handwritten math and math captured in images; and implement these in a user-friendly interface with helpful features like autocompletion of common queries. The new engine will then be tested on Wikipedia and on CiteSeerX, an open-source repository of academic papers. The completed search engine, if successful, would vastly expand the possibilities of discovered for amateur and professional mathematicians alike, with numerous applications in both research and education.

    To develop a mathematically-aware search engine for popular use by both students and experts

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  • grantee: Association of Research Libraries
    amount: $315,100
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To develop and disseminate a Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Software Preservation

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Krista Cox

    This grant funds an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries to document and clarify copyright and intellectual property law issues related to the archiving of software. Led by intellectual property lawyer, Peter Jaszi, the initiative has three parts. First, Jaszi and a team of collaborators will undertake a broad literature review and conduct some 40 long-form interviews with legal experts, librarians, museum curators, software developers and other stakeholders to produce “a report on problems that arise in software preservation regarding issues of copyright and fair use.” The report will then become the basis for a set of small workshops to generate, after legal review, a code of reasonable best practices used by archivists to resolve those problems. Finally, a substantial outreach push will build community consensus in support of those best practices. The work will be stewarded by the Association of Research Libraries, whose membership has a strong interest in this area, but will also draw heavily on the museum community, as well as major professional organizations in computer science, and other computationally intensive disciplines. The effort promises the legal state-of-play surrounding several thorny intellectual property issues related to software archiving, promote better archival practices across the country and further the cause of reproducibility in research, which depends on the continued availability of software used to generate scientific results.

    To develop and disseminate a Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Software Preservation

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  • grantee: ORCID
    amount: $19,900
    city: Bethesda, MD
    year: 2017

    To support participant travel to a meeting that will inform the next ORCID strategic plan

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Laurel Haak

    To support participant travel to a meeting that will inform the next ORCID strategic plan

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