Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Hypothesis Project
    amount: $12,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To partially support a workshop and hackathon to develop a joint roadmap for open science software tools

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dan Whaley

    To partially support a workshop and hackathon to develop a joint roadmap for open science software tools

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  • grantee: Ithaka Harbors Inc
    amount: $20,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To partially support the second Bowen Colloquium

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Catharine Hill

    To partially support the second Bowen Colloquium

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  • grantee: University of Pennsylvania
    amount: $48,784
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2018

    To support continued development of Manubot, a git-native authoring tool for scientific manuscripts

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Daniel Himmelstein

    To support continued development of Manubot, a git-native authoring tool for scientific manuscripts

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  • grantee: The Internet Archive
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To partially support participation in the 2018 Decentralized Web Summit

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Wendy Hanamura

    To partially support participation in the 2018 Decentralized Web Summit

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $384,633
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To develop a global, scalable, and sustainable technical and organizational infrastructure for persistent unique identifiers of physical scientific samples

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Kerstin Lehnert

    The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) grew out of an initial need to foster better citation of geological samples. As of mid-2018, there are over 6.5 million individual physical specimens represented within the IGSN, and a network of 25 IGSN “allocating agents” across five continents. After a number of years of growth within geoscience, the IGSN is confronted with increased interest from other disciplines; for example, the IGSN has already been used to register IDs for biological specimens and archaeological artifacts. Rather than encourage the development of a number of different discipline-specific registries, Lehnert and an international team of collaborators plan to redesign IGSN to support physical samples and specimens from across the sciences. Funds from this grant support technical development of the IGSN platform and a series of working meetings to bring together current IGSN registrars, other stakeholders, and persistent identifier (PID) experts to strategically plan the organizational and technical future of the initiative.

    To develop a global, scalable, and sustainable technical and organizational infrastructure for persistent unique identifiers of physical scientific samples

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  • grantee: Wikimedia Foundation
    amount: $200,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To support three years of workshops, hackathons, and outreach at the intersection of academic citation, bibliographic metadata, and Wikipedia

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dario Taraborelli

    This grant provides three years of support for gatherings of WikiCite, a project within the Wikipedia ecosystem designed to both improve citation within Wikipedia and to expand the Wikidata project in ways useful to the scientific community. Grant funds will support a dedicated annual WikiCite meeting, as well as a series of smaller satellite meetings at other Wikimedia events. The organizers will also maintain a strong presence at other scholarly communication meetings, bringing the energy and technical sophistication of the Wikimedia community to bear on innovation in scholarly communication more broadly.

    To support three years of workshops, hackathons, and outreach at the intersection of academic citation, bibliographic metadata, and Wikipedia

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  • grantee: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    amount: $501,416
    city: Chapel Hill, NC
    year: 2018

    To improve the ability to curate and verify replication datasets within the Dataverse data archiving platform by integrating computational notebooks and software containerization with data curation workflows

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Jonathan Crabtree

    This grant funds a project led by Jonathan Crabtree, Director of Cyberinfrastructure at the University of North Carolina’s Odum Institute, to improve and expand the capabilities of the Dataverse open source data repository platform. Odum is responsible for executing and implementing the Replication and Verification Policy for the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS) and uses Dataverse as the underlying platform where authors who publish in AJPS can upload their data and software code to ensure results may be replicated. Because Dataverse was originally designed for data and not software, however, the process can be unwieldy and time consuming. Crabtree and his team plan to use the Jupyter computing platform and the open source software “containerization” toolkit Docker to create a “Confirmable Reproducible Research (CoRe2) environment” for Dataverse that would combine the ability to containerize computational research with communication and workflow tools. This would greatly speed and partially automate the process of verifying that submitted research results can be verified using the code and data uploaded. Grant funds will provide support for this project for three years.  years.

    To improve the ability to curate and verify replication datasets within the Dataverse data archiving platform by integrating computational notebooks and software containerization with data curation workflows

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $499,697
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To improve the ability to curate and verify replication datasets within the Dataverse data archiving platform through a suite of software containerization and metadata tools, and to support the development of a new data curation service at the Harvard Dataverse

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Merce Crosas

    This grant funds a series of four projects by Mercи Crosas, Chief Data Science and Technology Officer at Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science to expand and improve software handling capabilities of the Dataverse open source data repository platform. First Crosas will integrate Dataverse with Encapsulator, an open source tool that allows the creation of a computational “time capsule” that preserves the exact computational environment used to conduct a piece of data analysis. Second, Crosas will create links between Dataverse and Code Ocean, a computational reproducibility platform that was spun out of Cornell Technion’s incubator program. Third, Crosas will develop a set of metadata versioning and exploration tools that will increase incentives for data curation by returning richer usage statistics to data providers and publishers. Finally, Crosas will model and pilot a fee-based curation service that would allow the sustainable scaling of data and code curation in Dataverse. This work, like all other development on and organizational innovation within the Dataverse community, will be freely available and useful to the dozens of other institutions running the software to power their own data archives.

    To improve the ability to curate and verify replication datasets within the Dataverse data archiving platform through a suite of software containerization and metadata tools, and to support the development of a new data curation service at the Harvard Dataverse

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  • grantee: Center for Open Science
    amount: $499,431
    city: Charlottesville, VA
    year: 2018

    To implement and test features to signal credibility and trust on preprint services

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Brian Nosek

    The Center for Open Science’s (COS) preprint platform was designed to serve a variety of scholarly communities, especially lowering barriers to entry for those disciplines new to preprint publication whose needs were not being served by the larger, more highly powered preprint servers like arXiv. This grant funds a project by COS founder Brian Nosek to use the COS preprint platform as the setting for a series of experiments that will test how user trust is affected by different preprint platform features. Nosek proposes to use the launch of already-planned features like annotation and visual icons to run a set of experiments on the assignment of trust by readers of scientific research. While the budget includes some technical development, the bulk of the requested funding will support the COS “metascience” team to take a mixed-methods research approach, combining surveys with analysis of usage data from the preprint servers to understand the impact of annotation and “reproducibility badges” on readers’ perceptions of trustworthiness of individual preprints and of the preprint server overall.

    To implement and test features to signal credibility and trust on preprint services

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  • grantee: National Information Standards Organization
    amount: $197,372
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2018

    To support the implementation of MathML in the open source Chromium browser

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Todd Carpenter

    Somewhere between 50% and 60% of internet users use Google Chrome to browse the web. Chrome, unfortunately, doesn’t natively display mathematics using the standard XML markup language MathML. This forces sites like Wikipedia to generate static images of mathematical notation from the underlying MathML when Chrome can’t render the markup on its own. Not only does this have implications for accessibility, it also inhibits the development of innovative new interfaces and applications that would rely on dynamic interaction with mathematical notation via browser-based programming languages like JavaScript. Funds from this grant will support a project led by the National Information Standards Organization to implement full MathML rendering in Chromium (the open source codebase underlying the Chrome web browser). Technical development will be undertaken by developers at Igalia, an open source software consultancy that has played a key role in MathML integration in other major web engines.

    To support the implementation of MathML in the open source Chromium browser

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