Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $677,783
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To develop and promulgate best practices in the review of statistical research software

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Karthik Ram

    Supported by the Sloan Foundation since 2013, rOpenSci is an open source community that develops research software inside the R computing environment, especially focusing on the creation of expansions and modifications of R useful to the research scientist. The rOpenSci community has become known for high-quality, trusted research software, largely because every user-developed package is run through a robust peer review process before it is added to the rOpenSci suite. Increased access to basic data science skills combined with the demand for research software has led to rapid growth in software packages, many of which implement statistical methods. A large proportion of these software packages are highly variable in quality and lack appropriate tests to ensure that the software produces correct results consistently, across a variety of conditions. Much of this is due to the lack of clear standards (within and across fields) and guidance on how to implement them. Funds from this grant support a two-year effort to address this pressure on two fronts: to extend the rOpenSci model of scientific software peer review into substantial assessment of the implementation of statistical methods, and to build out a technical infrastructure to manage this expanded review process.

    To develop and promulgate best practices in the review of statistical research software

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $280,942
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Marti Hearst

    Whether you call it machine learning, deep learning, or AI, a new set of methods at the interface of statistics and computer science are being applied to research across the sciences. A consequence of the excitement about these new methods is that disciplinary researchers eager to use them in their research must both get up to speed quickly and maintain an awareness of a new literature, one which is moving at high volume and velocity. Increased interest in the AI literature, however, comes just as that literature is getting harder to read thanks to a combination of short publish-response cycles and rapidly evolving norms about what should be cited and explained in a given paper. This grant funds a project by computer scientist Marti Hearst to develop interfaces to the AI literature that offer additional context and support for readers not deeply acquainted with the field. Hearst’s lab will develop algorithms and software to help readers see the meanings of symbols and terms anywhere in the text of a given article, regardless of where they are defined, and pull in explanations from papers in the co-citation network of the paper being read where definitions are not present in the text itself. The resulting software, implemented in a lightweight interface that integrates with PDF readers to ensure wide adoption, will be of value to researchers across the sciences who are adopting machine learning methods.

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

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  • grantee: Dryad
    amount: $635,915
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2019

    To support the integration of both community and technology initiatives in a central data curation hub for both researchers and institutions

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Melissanne Scheld

    This grant supports the expansion of Dryad, a well-respected nonprofit and open source data repository that has focused on the deposit and curation of datasets in fields lacking a disciplinary data repository. Partnering with the University of California’s California Digital Library and CERN’s Zenodo repository, Dryad aims to develop a community data curation and publication platform driven by researcher needs and institutional values. The envisioned expansion will integrate Dryad with other software systems commonly used by researchers across the academic research and publication pipeline, including Jupyter, rOpenSci, DataSeer, ScholarOne, and Editorial Manager. Additional funds will support a partnership with Zenodo to integrate the two systems, supporting publishers and researchers, and allowing for triaged deposits to best practice repositories based on content type.

    To support the integration of both community and technology initiatives in a central data curation hub for both researchers and institutions

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  • grantee: OCTO
    amount: $76,501
    city: Woodinville, WA
    year: 2019

    To support the development of a general-purpose tool to compare versions of a digital file

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Michael Hay

    To support the development of a general-purpose tool to compare versions of a digital file

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  • grantee: The American Assembly
    amount: $50,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To support technical and interface work in advance of the release of the Open Syllabus Explorer 2.0

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Joseph Karaganis

    To support technical and interface work in advance of the release of the Open Syllabus Explorer 2.0

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  • grantee: University of Virginia
    amount: $495,578
    city: Charlottesville, VA
    year: 2019

    To support development on Scholia, a software tool to facilitate the exploration and curation of the research literature

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Daniel Mietchen

    To support development on Scholia, a software tool to facilitate the exploration and curation of the research literature

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  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $65,780
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2018

    To support further development of PREreview, a platform to improve the training of scientists in peer review practices

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Daniela Saderi

    To support further development of PREreview, a platform to improve the training of scientists in peer review practices

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  • grantee: American Association for the Advancement of Science
    amount: $649,893
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2018

    To continue to promote the professionalization and institutionalization of the role of the community engagement manager in scientific societies and large-scale research collaborations

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Joshua Freeman

    In 2015 the Foundation funded a pilot Community Engagement Fellows program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The program is run by longtime scientific community manager Lou Woodley, who led a yearlong planning process to develop a curriculum that tailors community engagement skills training to the scientific research context, and then recruited the first cohort of fellows for the 2017 calendar year. Drawn from professional societies and large scientific collaborations, fellows came together for in-person workshops at the beginning, middle, and end of the fellowship year, as well as for regular webinars and other online discussions. A robust program evaluation made clear that the fellowship year wasn’t just extremely effective for the participants, it also led to tangible investments in and foregrounding of community management by many of the host organizations. This grant funds a continuation of the Community Engagement Fellows program, which includes funds for administration, for the recruitment and support of the 2019 fellows cohort, and for a shorter-term “visiting scholars” program that could draw on program alumni and other community management professionals.

    To continue to promote the professionalization and institutionalization of the role of the community engagement manager in scientific societies and large-scale research collaborations

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  • grantee: Aspiration
    amount: $448,800
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2018

    To reduce barriers to data publication by providing context-specific guidance on sharing best practice, including suitable repositories

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Kristen Ratan

    Recent years have seen a proliferation of policies coming from research funders, universities, and publishers intended to prod scientists toward more proactive archiving, citation, and data sharing practices. The mere presence of a policy, however, doesn’t guarantee compliance, so the Foundation has looked to support technologies that make it easier to adopt best practices in research data and software management. The grant funds work by the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and the California Digital Library to develop DataSeer, an open sourced rule-based platform that would be able to automatically identify data referenced explicitly or implicitly in a grant proposal, data management plan, or draft article and suggest appropriate repositories for deposit of that data. By providing nudges and suggestions at specific targeted moments in the research lifecycle (like the creation of a data management plan, submission of a grant proposal, or submission of a manuscript), DataSeer has the potential to substantively improve proactive data sharing and archiving by researchers, while reducing the costs of compliance checking for funders, libraries, and publishers.

    To reduce barriers to data publication by providing context-specific guidance on sharing best practice, including suitable repositories

    More
  • grantee: Lyrasis
    amount: $20,000
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2018

    To conduct a feasibility study to assess the potential for development of the open source SimplyE ebook platform to serve the academic community

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Robert Miller

    To conduct a feasibility study to assess the potential for development of the open source SimplyE ebook platform to serve the academic community

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