Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Project Implicit, Inc.
    amount: $49,500
    city: Lexington, MA
    year: 2013

    To lay the necessary groundwork for a replication website initiative, aimed at increasing and disseminating replications

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Stephanie Wykstra

    To lay the necessary groundwork for a replication website initiative, aimed at increasing and disseminating replications

    More
  • grantee: Association of Research Libraries
    amount: $50,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2013

    To develop a proof of concept prototype for the SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) federated digital repository for the public access, text and data mining, and long? term preservation of research articles and data produced by higher education

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Elliott Shore

    To develop a proof of concept prototype for the SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) federated digital repository for the public access, text and data mining, and long? term preservation of research articles and data produced by higher education

    More
  • grantee: ORCID
    amount: $349,659
    city: Bethesda, MD
    year: 2013

    To encourage the near-term implementation of ORCID identifiers by universities and professional associations, through a grant competition and community outreach

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Laurel Haak

    This grant supports efforts to increase adoption of the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), an enterprising new system that aims to provide a unique, persistent identifier to every researcher on the planet, allowing scholars, content aggregators, and the public to easily pull together research associated with that researcher’s ID, wherever it is published, however the author’s name appears. Funds from this grant will support expansion of ORCID through a small grant competition that challenges universities, professional societies, and other academic institutions to implement ORCID identifiers into existing repository, learning management, academic profile, conference management, and other technology platforms. Ten winners will be chosen from grant applicants based on the quality of the plans submitted and the likelihood that their work will lower barriers to ORCID adoption by peers.

    To encourage the near-term implementation of ORCID identifiers by universities and professional associations, through a grant competition and community outreach

    More
  • grantee: ImpactStory
    amount: $500,000
    city: Carrboro, NC
    year: 2013

    To support the scaling and further development to sustainability of ImpactStory, a nonprofit open altmetrics platform that helps scholars evaluate, sort, consume, and reward web-native products

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Jason Priem

    One of the goals of Sloan’s Scholarly Communication program is to better facilitate the discovery and review of research products available on the Internet. Since many of these materials (from working papers to datasets) do not appear in conventional journals, a small but growing community has begun to explore the idea of alternative metrics of value and impact, ranging from downloads and inclusion in personal reference manager databases to social media references.Funds from this grant support the continued development of ImpactStory, an innovative altmetrics platform that aggregates citations and other mentions of academic scholarship on the Internet, including references from arXiv, Mendeley, PLOS, Dryad, PubMed and Scopus, as well as Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube, and Wikipedia. Grant funds support development of the platform and the creation and implementation of a long term institutional sustainability plan.

    To support the scaling and further development to sustainability of ImpactStory, a nonprofit open altmetrics platform that helps scholars evaluate, sort, consume, and reward web-native products

    More
  • grantee: The American Assembly
    amount: $210,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2013

    To develop a vision and prototype for a large-scale online database of university course syllabi

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Joe Karaganis

    While there are currently many different ways to find out how much a given article or book has been cited, there is no way to know how many times it has appeared on a syllabus, and the impact of scholarly research in the classroom is a blind spot for which we have no accessible data. One could, for example, imagine a “syllabus count” alongside a citation count, not just for articles and books, but also for all sorts of other resources from datasets to websites. Beyond individual impact, a broad, computable archive of syllabi could be a valuable resource for research on the evolution of disciplines.This grant supports efforts by Joe Karaganis of the American Assembly to develop just such a resource.  Karaganis has assembled a diverse team of data providers, application designers and other collaborators to coordinate a planning and prototyping process aimed at bringing a robust syllabus archive to life.

    To develop a vision and prototype for a large-scale online database of university course syllabi

    More
  • grantee: National Information Standards Organization
    amount: $207,533
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2013

    To study, propose, and develop community-based standards or recommended practices in the field of alternative metrics for research products

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Todd Carpenter

    Altmetrics aggregators who draw together diverse sources of data about the use of research products face a fundamental challenge: the myriad dissemination and archival platforms used by academics can make it difficult (if not impossible) to get consistent and normalized access to the data they need. While a general consensus is emerging among online publishers and repositories of articles, datasets, software, and other materials that such impact data could be valuable to their users, no clear standards exist governing how organizations should make that data accessible to others.This grant funds efforts by the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) to lead a two-year standard-setting process for altmetrics data. NISO will begin by hosting a series of scoping meetings over the first 12 months of the grant, bringing stakeholders together to map the most salient sources of data based on demand from altmetrics services as well as the researchers, funders, and deans that represent altmetrics end-users. After synthesizing those findings in a white paper for wide distribution, NISO will shift into a formal standards-setting process targeting the most pressing use cases, ultimately producing standard data exchange formats for adoption by those who produce and consume altmetrics data.

    To study, propose, and develop community-based standards or recommended practices in the field of alternative metrics for research products

    More
  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $77,947
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2013

    To support a landscape survey and workshop on data sharing from research using technological tools to study human behavior in digital environments

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Eszter Hargittai

    To support a landscape survey and workshop on data sharing from research using technological tools to study human behavior in digital environments

    More
  • grantee: Dartmouth College
    amount: $13,075
    city: Hanover, NH
    year: 2013

    To incorporate and improve MathOverflow, an open question-and-answer exchange site for mathematicians

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Francois Dorais

    To incorporate and improve MathOverflow, an open question-and-answer exchange site for mathematicians

    More
  • grantee: University of Oklahoma
    amount: $13,162
    city: Norman, OK
    year: 2012

    To support a meeting to explore digital models for the Isis history of science bibliography

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Stephen Weldon

    To support a meeting to explore digital models for the Isis history of science bibliography

    More
  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $400,000
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2012

    To support the technical development of a platform for archiving executable content and the environment in which it runs, as well as a plan for the institutionalization and ongoing sustainability of such an archive

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Mahadev Satyanarayanan

    Reproducing computational research requires more than having access to lines of code or compiled software. Reproducibility often requires running computations on an identical processor, or using a now defunct operating system. But computer hardware and software become obsolete surprisingly quickly, making the replication of old computational environments difficult or impossible. The advent of cloud computing and virtualization technology has opened a promising opportunity to address this problem. A researcher could preserve not only data and the computational algorithms used to analyze it, but the entire computational environment in which his research was conducted. Future researchers could then use virtualization to precisely replicate that environment, whatever hardware changes the future brings. The power of virtualization makes it not implausible to envision a library of virtual machines simulating every physical computer across the history of computing. This grant supports a project led by Carnegie Mellon computer scientist Mahadev Satyanarayanan and university librarian Gloriana St. Clair to build just such a library, called the "Open Virtual Machine Image Library", known as Olive. Funds will support the technical development of the OLIVE platform, initiatives to reduce the resources required to run archived virtual machines, and the development of a business plan and long-term sustainability strategy.

    To support the technical development of a platform for archiving executable content and the environment in which it runs, as well as a plan for the institutionalization and ongoing sustainability of such an archive

    More