Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National Information Standards Organization
    amount: $222,706
    city: Baltimore, MD
    year: 2011

    To develop a new specification for the real-time synchronization of web resources housed in separate repositories

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Todd Carpenter

    No central authority tracks updates to an article or a dataset as it moves through various publication channels or institutional, disciplinary, or personal repositories over the course of its lifetime. A scholarly research paper, for example, might be available on a preprint server, the author's home page, a journal's website, and in an institutional repository. Imagine the difficulty an author would face should she wish to add a passage about updated findings to previous versions of the paper. The proliferation of copies means online materials behave surprisingly like physical paper; once you print out a copy of an article, the author can't push revisions to your copy. To address this need, the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is beginning a project to convene a group of key computer and information scientists to develop a standard for the versioning and synchronization of web resources. They also plan to hold a series of workshops that follow the community development process, resulting in a codified standard that meets the needs of publishers, repositories, and other stewards of scholarly products. Alongside other work on data citation, annotation, and canonical author identifiers, the resulting NISO standard would be a valuable tool to facilitate the publication of scholarship and research data on the web, and is likely to be useful in other contexts as well. Funds from this grant will provide partial support for NISO's efforts over the next two years.

    To develop a new specification for the real-time synchronization of web resources housed in separate repositories

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  • grantee: Public Library of Science
    amount: $353,393
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2011

    To develop, deploy, and promote Article Level Metrics tools and approaches

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Peter Binfield

    From a user's perspective, rapid-publication "megajournals" like PLoS ONE share a common problem with preprint servers like arXiv or the Social Science Research Network: without traditional quality indicators, researchers are left having to make sense of an ever-growing pile of undifferentiated articles. Readers need better mechanisms at the article level to enable them to see in a moment how one paper relates to others in terms of citation, usage, and other indicators of quality so that they can easily make informed choices about which papers are most relevant to their own research and interests. This two-year grant to the Public Library of Science supports efforts to develop, deploy, and promote just such article-level metrics both for PLoS and for the wider academic community. Funds will support three related activities. First, the PLoS team will extend their existing publishing platform to pull in data well beyond basic download counts, from inbound web links to usage statistics via popular research management platforms like Mendeley and Zotero. Second, PLoS will substantially refine the interfaces used to present that data, testing a number of design approaches to determine what visualizations are most helpful to their users. Finally, PLoS will launch a substantial outreach program, circulating white papers and engaging both open-access and commercial publishers in a broad conversation about article-level metrics adoption. Code developed through this grant will be released under a free/open-source license.

    To develop, deploy, and promote Article Level Metrics tools and approaches

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $334,667
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To study the feasibility of an online and open access Mathematical Heritage Library

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Scott Weidman

    Funds from this grant support a project by the National Academy of Sciences' Board on Mathematical Sciences and their Applications to study the feasibility of creating an online, open-access Mathematical Heritage Library. Issues to be addressed by the study include evaluating the potential value of such a library, identifying desired and useful capabilities for the library, assessing potential obstacles and challenges to the development process, and estimating probable costs of the library's development, deployment, and maintenance.

    To study the feasibility of an online and open access Mathematical Heritage Library

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  • grantee: The Graduate Center of The City University of New York
    amount: $107,500
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To develop and test with the Modern Language Association (MLA) an alpha version of a "Commons-in-a-Box" software tool for scholarly communities first developed at City University of New York

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Matthew Gold

    To develop and test with the Modern Language Association (MLA) an alpha version of a "Commons-in-a-Box" software tool for scholarly communities first developed at City University of New York

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $15,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2011

    To support the Microsoft Research eScience Workshop: Transforming Scholarly Communication

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Alyssa Goodman

    To support the Microsoft Research eScience Workshop: Transforming Scholarly Communication

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  • grantee: Stanford University
    amount: $125,000
    city: Stanford, CA
    year: 2011

    To fund development of the Open Monograph Press platform, including an innovative pre-publication module

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator John Willinsky

    To fund development of the Open Monograph Press platform, including an innovative pre-publication module

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  • grantee: George Mason University
    amount: $861,762
    city: Fairfax, VA
    year: 2011

    To pioneer new methods for capturing and highlighting online scholarly materials in ways that are useful to research communities

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Joan Fragaszy

    The shift to digitally-mediated forms of scholarship has been characterized by a substantial growth in channels for and diversity of scholarly work. We see this in the flourishing of content in preprint servers and rapid- publication channels like arXiv, PLoS ONE, and the Social Science Research Network alongside unconventional forms of scholarly communication like research blogs and personal websites, all of which enable scholars to put their work out for broad access. Part of the Foundation's emerging strategy to ease this transition is to support the development of new models of filtering and curating online scholarly materials. This three-year grant supports the work of Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt at George Mason University's Center for History and New Media (CHNM) in the development of a software platform that will enable professional societies and interdisciplinary networks of scholars to collectively organize and review relevant resources. Cohen and Scheinfeldt will undertake a detailed study of various models for aggregating scholarly content, as well as a broad landscape survey of new and changing techniques for managing content on the "open web." In addition to contributing to the general body of knowledge about collective information filtering systems, this research will also directly inform the development of CHNM's "PressForward" platform, a substantial modification of the popular "Wordpress" blogging application that will enable the aggregation and curation of online scholarly resources at both an editorial and community level. Funds from this grant also support the experimental expansion of PressForward, currently powering DigitalHumanitiesNow.org, into four additional scholarly disciplines.

    To pioneer new methods for capturing and highlighting online scholarly materials in ways that are useful to research communities

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  • grantee: New Media Studio
    amount: $32,450
    city: Santa Barbara, CA
    year: 2011

    To build and test an open-source, active archiving service for science/engineering meeting posters

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Bruce Caron

    To build and test an open-source, active archiving service for science/engineering meeting posters

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $281,258
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To develop, analyze, and promote standards for the citation and attribution of data sets by research communities

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Paul Uhlir

    Progress in science depends critically on a familiar but delicate system that rewards citations and priority. Scientists are rewarded for discovering something first, and they are rewarded for writing something that other scientists frequently reference. Though this familiar system provides well established norms for the citation of scholarly articles, there are not similarly accepted norms for citing scientific datasets. Funds from this grant will support a project by the National Research Council's Board on Research Data and Information to address how to attribute and cite scientific datasets. The Board will establish a steering committee to examine practices and standards, to hold a symposium and workshop, and to organize a joint series of meetings in cooperation with the CODATA-ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation Practices.

    To develop, analyze, and promote standards for the citation and attribution of data sets by research communities

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  • grantee: Public Library of Science
    amount: $400,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2010

    To develop online hubs as a mechanism for organizing scientific content after it is published

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Peter Jerram

    Founded in 2000, the Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a driving force in the "open access" movement to make the results of scientific research available to everyone. PLoS's vision: a place where anyone from scientists to students to the public could access scientific research online and at no charge. PLoS essentially treats all scientific literature and its associated databases and commentary as a continuous, ever-growing relational database to be explored, mined, and recombined. Under traditional models, scientific papers are sequestered in a specialty, such as Arctic biology, even when the paper might have content equally relevant to marine mammals or molecular ecology. In 2008 and 2009 the Foundation provided grants to PLoS to develop a business plan for creating online "hubs" around scientific and medical subjects and then to create prototypes for subjects of special interest to Sloan, such as DNA barcoding and marine biodiversity. Importantly, PLoS links to all open-access material, not only to material published by PLoS itself. And it will also point to material that is not open-access, even if users may meet frustration in clicking on gated links. The Foundation increasingly sees the concept of PLoS hubs as central to scholarly practice in areas of Foundation interest, including emerging fields such as the microbiology of the indoor environment and Earth's deep carbon. Funds from this grant will support PLoS in the creation of online hubs as a mechanism for organizing scientific content after it is published.

    To develop online hubs as a mechanism for organizing scientific content after it is published

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