Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Eckerd College
    amount: $249,723
    city: Saint Petersburg, FL
    year: 2022

    To create the Eckerd Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (E-STEM) Scholarship Program to recruit and support Black, Latinx, and Indigenous students who aspire to a STEM graduate degree and career

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Laura Wetzel

    To create the Eckerd Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (E-STEM) Scholarship Program to recruit and support Black, Latinx, and Indigenous students who aspire to a STEM graduate degree and career

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  • grantee: University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc.
    amount: $82,651
    city: Athens, GA
    year: 2022

    To compile, codify, and curate a searchable database of digitized causal models

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Richard Watson

    To compile, codify, and curate a searchable database of digitized causal models

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $235,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2022

    To organize opportunities to run experiments and gather rigorous evidence about the effectiveness of different mechanisms for funding science

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Gail Cohen

    To organize opportunities to run experiments and gather rigorous evidence about the effectiveness of different mechanisms for funding science

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  • grantee: Wichita State University Foundation
    amount: $45,907
    city: Wichita, KS
    year: 2022

    To study historical and contemporary decision-support tools to inform the potential role of Large Language Models in scientific tooling

    • Program Technology
    • Initiative Trust in AI
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Ross Gruetzemacher

    To study historical and contemporary decision-support tools to inform the potential role of Large Language Models in scientific tooling

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $50,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2022

    To host a two-day interdisciplinary conference that links academic scholars with practitioners to advance deep decarbonization interventions in connection with the Justice40 Initiative

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Burçin Ünel

    To host a two-day interdisciplinary conference that links academic scholars with practitioners to advance deep decarbonization interventions in connection with the Justice40 Initiative

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  • grantee: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
    amount: $49,979
    city: Newark, NJ
    year: 2022

    To support an interdisciplinary workshop on the statistical implications of using privacy-protected files for social science research

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Ruobin Gong

    To support an interdisciplinary workshop on the statistical implications of using privacy-protected files for social science research

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  • grantee: Philanthropy New York
    amount: $28,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2022

    To support work on behalf of the nonprofit and charitable community

    • Program New York City Program
    • Investigator Anthony Salgado

    To support work on behalf of the nonprofit and charitable community

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $490,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2022

    To examine the relationship between renewable energy infrastructure siting and environmental conservation

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Rebecca Hernandez

    An important under-explored issue within energy systems literature is understanding the challenges that arise when two energy and environment goals conflict with one another. In particular, there is a desire to install more large-scale renewable energy generation resources to decarbonize the electricity sector, yet the siting of these power sources is increasingly occurring on sensitive and vulnerable lands that often serve as critical habitats for endangered species. This grant led by Rebecca Hernandez at the University of California, Davis will explore the challenges that arise when these two energy and environment goals conflict. Grant funds will allow Hernandez to explore this “renewable energy vs. conservation” tradeoff, exploring the West and Southwest regions of the United States to map and model the overlap between current and future conservation needs and renewable energy installation locations. The team will also engage a range of stakeholders to identify community preferences associated with these tradeoffs, with a particular focus on Indigenous nations and tribal communities. Funds will allow Hernandez to produce at least 4 peer-reviewed articles examining the conflict associated with species threatened by climate change and renewable energy development; produce detailed maps of range shift patterns for current and future renewable energy impacts on endangered species; undertake 2 stakeholder workshops; train 1 graduate student and 1 postdoctoral fellow; and produce a publicly accessible Climate-Smart Siting Guide for public distributions.

    To examine the relationship between renewable energy infrastructure siting and environmental conservation

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  • grantee: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    amount: $499,640
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2022

    To investigate how humans and machines collaborate on making decisions

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Nikhil Agarwal

    Recent evidence and trends have been undermining some predictions that robots are about to steal all our jobs. Researchers have evolved from believing that automation must lead to substantial unemployment. Many now argue that automation may actually increase employment. This can happen because Artificial Intellignece (AI) raises firm productivity and also because, in some situations, AI acts as a complement to human expertise. Rather than having nothing to do, it looks like we may instead learn to work alongside our new robotic friends. This grant supports Nikhil Agarwal and Tobias Salz at MIT who are investigating the collaborative nature of interactions between people and AI in knowledge-intensive environments. Their goal is to understand better how human decision-makers combine their own contextual information or intuition with machine generated predictions.   Grant funds will allow Agarwal and Salz to develop theoretical models of human decision-making with and without AI assistance, then test these models by running experiments on how human experts actually make use of AI tools in practice. The team will initially test their models through observing how radiologists interpret patients’ chest X-rays, varying the availability and timing of AI predictions and the presence or absence of contextual data such as the patients’ clinical histories. This will allow the team to explore, to take one example, the weight that radiologists give to AI predictions under different circumstances. The findings of this project, however, will have implications that go far beyond the practice of radiology, including potential further applications concerning the use of AI in financial transactions, corporate operations, and risk assessments.

    To investigate how humans and machines collaborate on making decisions

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  • grantee: The Pennsylvania State University
    amount: $1,193,927
    city: University Park, PA
    year: 2022

    To expand the multidisciplinary RTOGov research network examining the role and governance of regional transmission organizations that manage the electric power grid in the United States

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Seth Blumsack

    Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) and Independent System Operators (ISOs) have a substantial, critical impact on the function of the energy system. Each RTO and ISO is structured and governed differently, yet there is little research on how each of these entities operate. This grant builds on previous Sloan-funded research and provides ongoing support to an interdisciplinary research network, called the RTOGov network, that has is filling this knowledge gap, bringing together scholars from multiple disciplines and institutions. Now led by Seth Blumsack at Pennsylvania State University and Stephanie Lenhart at Boise State University, RTOGov will study how these entities operate and function, how each compares or contrasts with one another, and how differences in organizational structure and governance impact the service they provide to energy systems and customers. This phase will allow scholars in the network to undertake more comparative regional governance studies across institutions as well as examine broader policy issues associated with federal requirements for RTO governance. Building on practitioner collaborations established during the first phase of the project, RTOGov scholars will focus on sharing lessons learned to contribute to the formation of emerging RTO-like entities that are actively being designed in regions like the Southeast, Mountain West, and Alaska. Grant funds will allow RTOGov to produce at least 12-15 papers for academic journals in multiple fields and associated policy briefs or white papers; engage a diverse range of 25-30 additional contributing scholars; support the training of at least 8-10 students; and continue to provide guidance to practitioners. RTOGov also plans to organize and host 6 semi-annual research workshops that will gather participating researchers, contributors, and advisory committee members.

    To expand the multidisciplinary RTOGov research network examining the role and governance of regional transmission organizations that manage the electric power grid in the United States

    More
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